11-24-10 08:21 PM
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  1. jorGeorge's Avatar
    They died.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    LOL, good answer.
    11-19-10 11:16 AM
  2. kch50428's Avatar
    It's possible the office is constructed to be like a faraday cage so as to block RF. They should make that known so people have the choice to patronize this doctor or not. And as far as I know, making an office a faraday cage isn't illegal, where jammers are.
    11-19-10 12:44 PM
  3. CharlesH's Avatar
    Yep, seeing what that GSM buzz does to my radios, I can only imagine the interference it could create.
    GSM phones can cause interference due to the rapid on/off pulsing of the handset's transmitter. This is because GSM is a Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) protocol, where the phone transmits only during its assigned time slice. The transmitter of a CDMA phone, such as from VZW or Sprint, is on continuously while you are in a call. The signal from a CDMA phone is essentially like very low-level background noise and is pretty much undetectable (much less interference-causing) unless you have the particular equipment to extract the information.

    The above comment applies to "traditional" 2G GSM; if you are using 3G GSM, then you are actually using a CDMA protocol, albeit a different variant than is used by a "CDMA" phone.

    Even state government officials are not exempt from the prohibition against cell phone jammers. I saw an article recently where state prison officials in some state were trying to get a waiver from the FCC so they could install jammers in the prisons to prevent inmates from conducting their criminal enterprises from behind bars. As it stands now, the officials would be breaking federal law by installing jammers in the prisons.
    Last edited by CharlesH; 11-23-10 at 06:26 PM.
    11-23-10 06:11 PM
  4. bigsteveatt's Avatar
    Just about every doctor in every hospital uses a cell phone on a regular basis. The signal does not interfere with any equipment. Generally, they don't allow cell phone use for two reasons. One, not everyone is capable of using a cell phone in a courteous manner and will disturb others who are trying to rest or are just going through an altogether crappy time. Two, and the main reason most doctor's offices don't allow it, it can construe a major HIPPAA violation. There are signs at my doctor's office that state they are unable to speak to you while you're on a cell phone.

    And no, I'm not just pulling this out of my you-know-where. Prior to my current profession, I worked for a security company as an account specialist and helped put together security plans and policies manuals for numerous hospitals and medical centers.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-23-10 09:39 PM
  5. bigsteveatt's Avatar
    It's possible the office is constructed to be like a faraday cage so as to block RF. They should make that known so people have the choice to patronize this doctor or not. And as far as I know, making an office a faraday cage isn't illegal, where jammers are.
    Really? So are they supposed to put this disclaimer in their YellowPages ad? "Dr. Adams has been a family practitioner for over 20 years. Before deciding if our practice is right for you, please keep in mind that cell phone service is not available in our office.". On my list of things to look for when choosing a doctor, whether or not I can use my cell phone in the lobby is, well, not even on the list.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-23-10 09:44 PM
  6. CharlesH's Avatar
    Two, and the main reason most doctor's offices don't allow it, it can construe a major HIPPAA violation. There are signs at my doctor's office that state they are unable to speak to you while you're on a cell phone.
    Analog calls could be trivially eavesdropped on, but digital calls are a lot more work. Analog systems have been shut down for years now. I am not sure how hard it is to eavesdrop on GSM calls, but I know that eavesdropping on CDMA calls is essentially impossible unless you have very expensive equipment available only to certain government organizations. And they can get just get taps at the switch so they don't even have to bother with cracking the signal over the air. The CDMA providers don't have explicitly encrypt CDMA calls; it's inherent in the protocol that you cannot extract the signal from the background noise unless you know certain call-specific parameters. It's a heck of a lot easier for a snoop to put a tap on a landline than it is to pick up the call on the air. So if they are concerned about privacy violations, they should disallow use of landlines!
    Last edited by CharlesH; 11-24-10 at 06:23 PM.
    11-24-10 06:16 PM
  7. bigsteveatt's Avatar
    Analog calls could be trivially eavesdropped on, but digital calls are a lot more work. Analog systems have been shut down for years now. I am not sure how hard it is to eavesdrop on GSM calls, but I know that eavesdropping on CDMA calls is essentially impossible unless you have very expensive equipment available only to certain government organizations. And they can get just get taps at the switch so they don't even have to bother with cracking the signal over the air. The CDMA providers don't have explicitly encrypt CDMA calls; it's inherent in the protocol that you cannot extract the signal from the background noise unless you know certain call-specific parameters. It's a heck of a lot easier for a snoop to put a tap on a landline than it is to pick up the call on the air. So if they are concerned about privacy violations, they should disallow use of landlines!
    You have the wrong context. I don't mean to say that someone can drop in on your signal. Rather, there's no way for them to verify that the person on the other end of the line should be hearing any protected health information. Yes, I know its stupid. Virtually anyone within ear shot could get the same information. However, there have been complaints filed and lawsuits threatened, which makes insurance companies nervous. One such hospital I've worked with actually had a restriction in their liability policy that barred employees from discussing protected information with anyone on a cell phone, other than an actual healthcare provider.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-24-10 06:31 PM
  8. otacon#AC's Avatar
    It's illegal to purchase let alone use one in this country. If I was to report someone I'd jut contact the local FBI branch and let them take it from there.
    11-24-10 08:21 PM
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