05-24-09 05:42 PM
40 12
tools
  1. mab4285's Avatar
    I also belive with cell phones that if you maintain a number say in california and move to another state, if you call 911 you get a 911 center in the area the number comes from.
    It will ring to the local 911 center of wherever you are visiting....or at least it should. Based on my interactions with our local police and what they have told me, even though my number is from CT, it will ring to the local 911 call center where I am located in IL.

    Wireless 911 Services
    05-24-09 01:52 PM
  2. lastraid's Avatar
    Thanks for the info and the article.
    05-24-09 01:56 PM
  3. mab4285's Avatar
    No problem. The one thing I should mention however, is that if you are on a college campus that has a police department of its own (I've spent the last six years at universities that have their own sworn police officers and full police department, thus creating two police departments in the two cities I've lived in), it will ring to the main city police, not the campus police, even if you are on campus. Only campus phones will ring to the campus police department.
    05-24-09 02:03 PM
  4. ok4a56's Avatar
    I also belive with cell phones that if you maintain a number say in california and move to another state, if you call 911 you get a 911 center in the area the number comes from.
    It will ring to the local 911 center of wherever you are visiting....or at least it should. Based on my interactions with our local police and what they have told me, even though my number is from CT, it will ring to the local 911 call center where I am located in IL.

    Wireless 911 Services
    Wireless 911 works of the cell phone tower that the phone hits off of. In my county we have 6,879 cell towers. Each side of the tower is assigned to a local 911 center. Does not matter where your phone is from, or where you live, you will get the 911 center that belongs to the tower says they will take calls from that side of the tower. Now towers can be busy, and your call will move to another tower. I have taken cell phone calls from another state, because all the cell towers are busy between where the caller is and us.

    We have a very large University here, and all their 911 cell phone calls comes to our 911 center, not the center where they are from.

    No VoIP will call the center the phone was set up for, if it is not changed when the person moves.
    05-24-09 02:06 PM
  5. ok4a56's Avatar
    No problem. The one thing I should mention however, is that if you are on a college campus that has a police department of its own (I've spent the last six years at universities that have their own sworn police officers and full police department, thus creating two police departments in the two cities I've lived in), it will ring to the main city police, not the campus police, even if you are on campus. Only campus phones will ring to the campus police department.
    I am in Ohio, and can only talk about how it works here in the Buckeye State.

    Anyway, each county in Ohio can choose up to 5 911 centers to answer 911 calls from cell phones. Depending on how populated each county is, is how many centers will do it. In Central Ohio, we have almost 2 million people in our county, so 5 911 centers take on answering 911 calls. We are the largest of the centers and take about 600,000 911 cell phone calls a year.

    So in Ohio, you can be in a city that does not answer 911 cell calls, and if you call 911 you will go to one of the 911 centers in that county that do answer 911 calls. You will just be transferred over to the correct police department once your call is placed.
    05-24-09 02:14 PM
  6. mab4285's Avatar
    I am in Ohio, and can only talk about how it works here in the Buckeye State.

    Anyway, each county in Ohio can choose up to 5 911 centers to answer 911 calls from cell phones. Depending on how populated each county is, is how many centers will do it. In Central Ohio, we have almost 2 million people in our county, so 5 911 centers take on answering 911 calls. We are the largest of the centers and take about 600,000 911 cell phone calls a year.

    So in Ohio, you can be in a city that does not answer 911 cell calls, and if you call 911 you will go to one of the 911 centers in that county that do answer 911 calls. You will just be transferred over to the correct police department once your call is placed.
    My main point was to say that it will ring to the local 911 centers, and not the call centers of the area where the number originates from.
    05-24-09 02:17 PM
  7. gvillager's Avatar
    I frickin love how all of you are like "I don't want the government being able to track me...blah blah blah"

    People...unless you happen to be robbing banks, dealing drugs in record numbers, or murdering people I really don't think the police give a flying crap about you. Who cares if the police can track you...are you that paranoid that the little nugget of weed in your car is going to get you tracked down by the cops? Sheesh.
    I'll provide you with a possible scenario.

    Lets say a member of law enforcement suspects that his wife is cheating. He checks her cell phone records and sees that you two call each other 1-2 times a week. His wife is simply your co-worker and you have no romantic interest in her what so ever but you call each other to discuss work related issues. He gets it in his jealous/controlling mind that you must be the one shes sleeping with. Now the government gives unlimited access to our private records (cell phone, banking, medical, etc etc) without question to law enforcement because it's obvious that they would only ever use it for legitimate purposes. This law enforcement officer uses this information to locate and kidnap you, takes you to the edge of town in the middle of the night and pushes you off a bridge into the river. Someone finds your body a week later, it's determined that you must have committed suicide. No one ever finds out the truth because your murderer also happens to be the one "investigating" your death.
    Last edited by gvillager; 05-24-09 at 03:28 PM.
    05-24-09 03:26 PM
  8. mab4285's Avatar
    I'll provide you with a possible scenario.

    Lets say a member of law enforcement suspects that his wife is cheating. He checks her cell phone records and sees that you two call each other 1-2 times a week. His wife is simply your co-worker and you have no romantic interest in her what so ever but you call each other to discuss work related issues. He gets it in his jealous/controlling mind that you must be the one shes sleeping with. Now the government gives unlimited access to our private records (cell phone, banking, medical, etc etc) without question to law enforcement because it's obvious that they would only ever use it for legitimate purposes. This law enforcement officer uses this information to locate and kidnap you, takes you to the edge of town in the middle of the night and pushes you off a bridge into the river. Someone finds your body a week later, it's determined that you must have committed suicide. No one ever finds out the truth because your murderer also happens to be the one "investigating" your death.
    Unless you're Drew Peterson, this seems like you work as a writer for CSI, Law and Order or Numbers....

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    05-24-09 03:36 PM
  9. gvillager's Avatar
    Unless you're Drew Peterson, this seems like you work as a writer for CSI, Law and Order or Numbers....

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Assuming that Drew Peterson actually did it. And if he did do it, how many other Drew Petersons are out there that we don't know about?
    05-24-09 03:41 PM
  10. gotblackberry's Avatar
    A lot. Most murders go unsolved.
    05-24-09 04:07 PM
  11. TwinsX2Dad's Avatar
    I also belive with cell phones that if you maintain a number say in california and move to another state, if you call 911 you get a 911 center in the area the number comes from.
    Um, no - it is even pretty accurate when you cross state lines or move from one jurisdiction to another.

    I was recently in that economic hellhole, otherwise known as the beautiful state of Michigan. Saw an accident on the freeway, called 911 & I got Lansing.

    I call from Scottsdale & get Scottsdale. Phoenix gets me Phoenix. San Diego gets me San Diego.

    Where the system falls off is in multi-jurisdictions, if you're on a freeway, they may need to get you to the state patrol - but they do it.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    05-24-09 04:16 PM
  12. amosrock's Avatar
    I'll provide you with a possible scenario.

    Lets say a member of law enforcement suspects that his wife is cheating. He checks her cell phone records and sees that you two call each other 1-2 times a week. His wife is simply your co-worker and you have no romantic interest in her what so ever but you call each other to discuss work related issues. He gets it in his jealous/controlling mind that you must be the one shes sleeping with. Now the government gives unlimited access to our private records (cell phone, banking, medical, etc etc) without question to law enforcement because it's obvious that they would only ever use it for legitimate purposes. This law enforcement officer uses this information to locate and kidnap you, takes you to the edge of town in the middle of the night and pushes you off a bridge into the river. Someone finds your body a week later, it's determined that you must have committed suicide. No one ever finds out the truth because your murderer also happens to be the one "investigating" your death.
    Please tell me you're not serious?
    05-24-09 04:21 PM
  13. rachaelrant's Avatar
    I frickin love how all of you are like "I don't want the government being able to track me...blah blah blah"

    People...unless you happen to be robbing banks, dealing drugs in record numbers, or murdering people I really don't think the police give a flying crap about you. Who cares if the police can track you...are you that paranoid that the little nugget of weed in your car is going to get you tracked down by the cops? Sheesh.

    And yes...I love e911...If i'm in trouble and don't know where I am or can't speak well enough to tell 911 where I am...I want them to be able to find me. And I find it hard to believe that you'd rather be left for dead with no one able to find you than have e911 on your phone.
    This is the kind of thinking that scares me and has me seeing the erosion of freedom in America as we know it.

    I am a law-abiding citizen. I am not robbing banks, dealing drugs in record numbers, or murdering people.

    I am not in the LEAST paranoid that a little nugget of weed in my car is going to get me tracked down by the cops.

    I totally agree with you that the police don't "give a flying crap" about me.

    None of those are the point.

    There are "bad guys" on both sides and always room for abuse, even by the "good guys."

    It has nothing to do with if I'm not doing anything wrong, I have nothing to worry about.

    Someone knowing where I am at all times, where I've been, what I'm doing just because they CAN, even if they don't "give a flying crap" scares me. There is much more to fear there, much more possibility for abuse of that situation than one would ever have to fear of me robbing banks, dealing drugs in record numbers, or murdering people.

    It is, in my opinion, totally un-American.

    Now I agree, there are times when would possibly want to be able to be "tracked." My boyfriend was terrified to go hiking after he had a heart attack. But several years later, when he felt up to it, felt better about starting again, feeling he could call for help or be found if something happened.

    It is a comforting feeling when I'm out at night alone driving.

    But in general, the idea that if I am not doing anything wrong, I should have nothing to fear is abhorrent to me. Totally backwards and un-American and when I hear someone say that, it makes me cringe.
    05-24-09 04:42 PM
  14. gvillager's Avatar
    Please tell me you're not serious?
    Very serious. Do you honestly think that every single law enforcement officer is good and honorable and none of them have ever abused their power? You've got alot to learn about this world. Cops have a lot of power but lets not forget that they are still human. Sometimes those with power are corrupt.

    A friend of mine worked a few months as a corrections officer in a federal prison. He soon realized that he couldn't trust his fellow co-workers (other corrections officers) any more then the prisoners. It was common practice for his co-workers to set up prisoners that they didn't like. They would file bogus reports stating that they found drugs or weapons in a prisoners cell so they could punish them. Or they put a non-violent weaker prisoner in the same cell as someone who had a reputation for raping other prisoners. He soon learned that this was encouraged by the prison officials. When your in that situation you don't know who you can trust. He decided it was best for him to get out and he quit.
    05-24-09 05:27 PM
  15. Branta's Avatar
    So far off topic the thread is beyond recovery. Let it go, and move onto something more productive
    05-24-09 05:42 PM
40 12
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD