12-04-13 09:21 PM
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  1. ideadstock's Avatar
    I figured that. I mean it hasn't even been 24 hours yet. I'm stuck with this goddamn iPhone and it's irritating me.
    09-30-09 09:49 AM
  2. McCracken's Avatar
    Well try the steps in the first post. I would do them all. Make sure the battery is out of the phone NOW.
    09-30-09 09:51 AM
  3. ideadstock's Avatar
    Lol, it definitely is.
    09-30-09 09:57 AM
  4. R1cE's Avatar
    Thanks! I hope I will never have to use this
    09-30-09 12:42 PM
  5. sc2565's Avatar
    I was walking and texting in the rain because of an emergency situation. I got home about 2 minutes later and was still sending texts when the keyboard started acting up. I let it sit and dry out but the battery was still in the phone. Now none of the buttons work and I've tried the rice method over the past 2 days to no avail. During this period i would reassemble the phone and see if any of the buttons worked and they never did. This happened on the 28th and still nothing. The phone still rings and still can receive texts its just none of the buttons work. Is it probably a lost cause at this point? My last backup was on the 23rd so I have most of my info but I had one memo I need off of the phone but cant put in my security password to retrieve it. Should I try this method or just chalk it up as a loss and get a new 8900?
    10-03-09 04:05 PM
  6. methodical's Avatar
    I dont understand the need for alcohol unless an oil is involved. Why displace water+contaminants with alcohol rather than just more water? Alcohol and water are miscible, but that doesn't mean that alcohol will somehow make the water evaporate quicker - quite the opposite. when combined, water will evaporate very slowly until the alcohol is gone.

    Additionally, one of the most common contaminants to electronics would be sugar. Sugar is not soluble in alcohol.


    disassembly, thorough washing with distilled water, and a day of drying and your back in business. keyboards dry much faster when they are exposed to open air.

    I only use alcohol when oil-based contamination is possible.

    Not to say it doesn't work. Just seems unnecessary.
    10-04-09 10:08 AM
  7. McCracken's Avatar
    I dont understand the need for alcohol unless an oil is involved. Why displace water+contaminants with alcohol rather than just more water? Alcohol and water are miscible, but that doesn't mean that alcohol will somehow make the water evaporate quicker - quite the opposite. when combined, water will evaporate very slowly until the alcohol is gone.

    Additionally, one of the most common contaminants to electronics would be sugar. Sugar is not soluble in alcohol.


    disassembly, thorough washing with distilled water, and a day of drying and your back in business. keyboards dry much faster when they are exposed to open air.

    I only use alcohol when oil-based contamination is possible.

    Not to say it doesn't work. Just seems unnecessary.
    I would say one of the number one contaminants of phones in minerals from water.

    I recommend alcohol and a vigorous dip/shake in it because it does displace water through force, and then alcohol evaporates very quickly. I recommend this all based on experience in electronics assembly and field service repair with LED signs and their controllers. Not to say that distilled water is bad, but I find that water is much more stubborn.

    Alcohol's evaporation is so quick that it will not delay any water evaporation significantly. Especially when you really should leave your device to dry for several days.
    10-04-09 10:34 AM
  8. McCracken's Avatar
    I was walking and texting in the rain because of an emergency situation. I got home about 2 minutes later and was still sending texts when the keyboard started acting up. I let it sit and dry out but the battery was still in the phone. Now none of the buttons work and I've tried the rice method over the past 2 days to no avail. During this period i would reassemble the phone and see if any of the buttons worked and they never did. This happened on the 28th and still nothing. The phone still rings and still can receive texts its just none of the buttons work. Is it probably a lost cause at this point? My last backup was on the 23rd so I have most of my info but I had one memo I need off of the phone but cant put in my security password to retrieve it. Should I try this method or just chalk it up as a loss and get a new 8900?
    can it hurt you to try at this point?
    10-04-09 10:34 AM
  9. solokamgs's Avatar
    Great Write up.
    10-04-09 08:43 PM
  10. McCracken's Avatar
    Great Write up.
    Thanks. Seems some still think the write up in the FAQ section is appropriate. I disagree.
    10-05-09 06:36 AM
  11. smnc's Avatar
    OUTSTANDING write-up!

    This is the kind of advice I wish I'd had a decade ago when my best friend's first cell phone took that first horifying plunge into THE PUDDLE...
    Of the things you learn in a decade...


    However, I would tend to agree with methodical on the subject of distilled water vs alcohol. I don't trust the "mechanical displacement" method, unless one has a lab vibrator to ensure complete displacement (actually I do, somewhere...?).
    Isopropyl alcohol is more corrossive than water, and won't dissolve many of the contaminants we're worried about.
    Also, Silica gel is much more effective at absorbing water than alcohol, creating a dryer environment.
    I'm not saying alcohol is a bad idea, I'm just saying I prefer distilled (or better yet, de-ionized) water.

    Lastly, rice WILL work (especially glutinous or "sticky rice", just not nearly as well as silica gel. Rice will absorb the ambient water vapour in an enclosed environment like a ziploc bag. Since this will lower the relative humidity, water will evaporate more quickly, thus drying out the electronics faster.
    That said, you'd be have to be completely NUTS to rice instead of silica gel, given a choice. Silica gel is FAR superior, however in Canada we have very few gun stores, and a crafts store may not always be available, so rice may be your only choice.


    I think we can all agree that the most important step is to keep the battery out until the device is 100% dry.
    10-05-09 07:38 AM
  12. gardengirl's Avatar
    My one month old Blackberry Flip decided to go for a swim (backflip!) in the sink. It was only in the water for a few seconds.

    In short:
    1) Pull battery immediately.
    2) Blow Dry for 1-2 hours on cool setting, rotating phone often.
    3) Use space heater at a temp under 100F for 5 hours at a time, rotating often.
    4) DO NOT TURN YOUR PHONE BACK ON FOR AT LEAST 36 HOURS!

    I knew to pull the battery immediately, which I did, and left the back cover off. I then used a towel to dry up all of the excess water. I set my blow dryer to cool on the highest power setting, and blow dried it for about an hour and a half, constantly turning it and forcing the air into all of the parts. I had an old space heater, which I turned to the lowest heat setting on the highest fan setting. I set a thermometer beside my phone, which I had propped up on a bowl on the counter. The heater provided heat at a temp between 30 and 35 degrees celsius (85-95 farenheit), and I used it on and off for the next 36 hours for a few hours at a time, rotating the phone every couple of hours. In total, I used the space heater for about 20 hours.

    36 hours after my phone had gotten wet, I turned it back on. It all worked - including the track ball, microphone, speakers, and camera. There have been no ill effects at all since it went for its swim. My phone has the protector film on them (bestskins ever??), and I did not remove the film.

    After blowdrying the phone for 1 1/2 hours, I decided to visit this website to figure out what to do, and this method was disapproved of, but since I had already done it, it was already too late! I did not use rice, I did not use silica, I did not pour rubbing alcohol on my phone. I just used a lot of warm air over a long time period. I ensured the heat was even and not too hot, and gave it mulitple cool down times. I did not turn on the phone on at all during the 36 hours after it got wet. I left the battery back off for another 24 hours.

    I had dropped my old Motorola Razr in water about six months ago, and although it recovered, I messed it up by trying to turn it on several times before it was fully dry. I had wanted to leave my blackberry off for another 24 hours just in case, but I was leaving town and needed my phone, so gave it a try.

    Hope this helps!
    10-29-09 09:58 PM
  13. barbwyr's Avatar
    My one month old Blackberry Flip decided to go for a swim (backflip!) in the sink. It was only in the water for a few seconds.

    In short:
    1) Pull battery immediately.
    2) Blow Dry for 1-2 hours on cool setting, rotating phone often.
    3) Use space heater at a temp under 100F for 5 hours at a time, rotating often.
    4) DO NOT TURN YOUR PHONE BACK ON FOR AT LEAST 36 HOURS!

    I knew to pull the battery immediately, which I did, and left the back cover off. I then used a towel to dry up all of the excess water. I set my blow dryer to cool on the highest power setting, and blow dried it for about an hour and a half, constantly turning it and forcing the air into all of the parts. I had an old space heater, which I turned to the lowest heat setting on the highest fan setting. I set a thermometer beside my phone, which I had propped up on a bowl on the counter. The heater provided heat at a temp between 30 and 35 degrees celsius (85-95 farenheit), and I used it on and off for the next 36 hours for a few hours at a time, rotating the phone every couple of hours. In total, I used the space heater for about 20 hours.

    36 hours after my phone had gotten wet, I turned it back on. It all worked - including the track ball, microphone, speakers, and camera. There have been no ill effects at all since it went for its swim. My phone has the protector film on them (bestskins ever??), and I did not remove the film.

    After blowdrying the phone for 1 1/2 hours, I decided to visit this website to figure out what to do, and this method was disapproved of, but since I had already done it, it was already too late! I did not use rice, I did not use silica, I did not pour rubbing alcohol on my phone. I just used a lot of warm air over a long time period. I ensured the heat was even and not too hot, and gave it mulitple cool down times. I did not turn on the phone on at all during the 36 hours after it got wet. I left the battery back off for another 24 hours.

    I had dropped my old Motorola Razr in water about six months ago, and although it recovered, I messed it up by trying to turn it on several times before it was fully dry. I had wanted to leave my blackberry off for another 24 hours just in case, but I was leaving town and needed my phone, so gave it a try.

    Hope this helps!
    Yeah..blow dryer and heat not the best ideas...you got lucky. With simple water it's not absolutely necesary to use an alcohol dunk, but if you live in an area that has a high mineral content in it's water, you will run the risk of shorting problems down the road as those mineral deposits grow and contact electrical contacts. If it's dirty water or soda or something that will leave a residue behind the alcohol dunk is a good idea.
    10-29-09 10:17 PM
  14. tmp3150's Avatar
    I see nobody decided to do the "alcohol dip" route. lol I really can't blame you for not going that route.
    10-30-09 01:36 AM
  15. barbwyr's Avatar
    I see nobody decided to do the "alcohol dip" route. lol I really can't blame you for not going that route.
    Was going to then my sister dropped her BB and needed my back up phone for a while why she tries to get hers replaced. If her warranty is denied I will have a working BB with dead LCD to do the test. Not that it matters....I have done this very thing with other electronics devices in the past on a regular basis with NO ill affects.
    10-30-09 02:05 AM
  16. barbwyr's Avatar
    So the other day my local gun dealer Turner Outdoorsman sent me my weekly internet coupon and wouldn't ya know it...it was a $6.95 desiccant pack called Safe-N-Dry. It's about the size of a sport sock filled with Silica Gel and includes and indicator chip on the front so you know when to recharge the pack. It's in a tear resistant TyVeck bag and has no dust issues. Under it's normal use it covers a safe or closet up to 35 cu/ft. It's the perfect size to place in a gallon ziplock bag or 9x13 sealable container with the phone. I also found 97% IPA at the local WalMart and am all set for any potential winter incidents.
    11-08-09 03:51 AM
  17. tmp3150's Avatar
    Great choice you made buying the desiccant pack. It is a better way to go then dipping your phone into 100% rubbing alcohol.




    So the other day my local gun dealer Turner Outdoorsman sent me my weekly internet coupon and wouldn't ya know it...it was a $6.95 desiccant pack called Safe-N-Dry. It's about the size of a sport sock filled with Silica Gel and includes and indicator chip on the front so you know when to recharge the pack. It's in a tear resistant TyVeck bag and has no dust issues. Under it's normal use it covers a safe or closet up to 35 cu/ft. It's the perfect size to place in a gallon ziplock bag or 9x13 sealable container with the phone. I also found 97% IPA at the local WalMart and am all set for any potential winter incidents.
    11-08-09 04:16 AM
  18. barbwyr's Avatar
    Great choice you made buying the desiccant pack. It is a better way to go then dipping your phone into 100% rubbing alcohol.
    Actually thre silica gels are for after I have done the alcohol bath or for a small plain water spill. If my phone goes for a swim in anything other than bottled water it will get an alcohol bath as even the tap water here leaves minerals behind after it drys, especially this time of year because they are gearing up for the influx of rainwater into our drinking water.

    And when it comes to liquids like muddy water, soda, or yuck...toilet water, I want all the nasties out.
    11-08-09 04:38 AM
  19. iLovemy_bb's Avatar
    Wow thanks...if this ever happens...I'll try it out.
    11-09-09 02:24 PM
  20. pkcable's Avatar
    Moved to Tip, How To & FAQ section!
    12-15-09 12:55 PM
  21. tsinelass's Avatar
    Thanks for this info. But it hope it doesn't happen to my BB. LOL
    04-03-10 07:52 AM
  22. RJanney's Avatar
    Great post & I'm glad to see it stickied. My BBStorm1 took a two second dip in plain water, and from previous phone disasters, I knew what to do. I didn't use the alcohol, rice, or desiccant, so I suppose luck was with me.

    Why I'm posting is to see what suggestions you may have to deal with the screen: as it was drying, extant moisture continued to seep into the laminate. The phone is perfectly functional, and the screen is clear - just a little three dimensional looking, with a few lighter spots looking at it straight on & faint micro streaks visible when held at an angle. Would the desiccant be of any help with this cosmetic issue, or is it too late? I'm upgrading to the Storm2 & would like to sell this one.

    TIA & thanks for a good fix to a common problem.
    04-05-10 11:11 PM
  23. lbwlovestw9's Avatar
    I used rice when I dropped my blackberry in.a puddel of water and it works fine now, I have some rice grains in my phone, it sounds like popcorn popping inside my phone when it vibrates sometimes. Lol. But other than that it worked in less than a day!
    I would not use rice but instead wood dried pulp along and maybe with your alcohol idea.
    There is another chemical known as tuner cleaner it used to be used for TV tuners the old kind ya turn that would probably work better it evaporates very very rapid.
    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    04-18-10 08:44 PM
  24. andyschumann's Avatar
    this is a nice tut... but the way i fix a wet device is to soak it in lacquer thinner.. much more effective than alcohol and dont take 5 days...
    04-21-10 12:55 AM
  25. vinmontRD's Avatar
    Actually, the alcohol advice is quite valid. You can all do a quick web search and find numerous respectable source advising the same thing - or an even more extreme alcohol bath to help dry out wet electronics.

    Alcohol disperses very quickly through water, and is far more volatile (and evaporative) than water - this helps the water evaporate faster than it would otherwise. There's little in the cell phone that would be damaged by a brief alcohol bath if you didn't leave it soaking. Lacquer thinner would be a major concern I'd think, as I can easily imagine it attacking printed circuit coating layers.

    Instead of speculating - just spend 15 mins on some web searches and you'll get a much better sense of this from perfectly respectable sources.
    05-01-10 04:34 PM
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