01-13-11 11:16 PM
47 12
tools
  1. bablovestwloha's Avatar
    Thanks for the tip!

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-04-09 01:11 AM
  2. naiverida's Avatar
    appreciate the tips
    11-12-09 05:18 PM
  3. Newpunk's Avatar
    Spot on, I always follow these precautions before working on any electronics.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-17-09 05:13 PM
  4. kjjb0204's Avatar
    I never work on any electronics without my ESD wriststrap attached. Bought a small computer tool set kit for about $20 at CompUsa (RIP) and I use tools from that kit every week for something or another. Has torx drivers and everything.
    11-17-09 05:48 PM
  5. Vaman20147's Avatar
    good thread
    11-19-09 12:00 AM
  6. infinus's Avatar
    (I am hoping a mod will sticky this in the tips and tricks forum)

    Many of us want to disassemble our beloved BlackBerries for one reason or another, replace a keyboard, a bezel, etc. but I have seen a lot of people complain their device just dies permanently after they are done working on it.

    So here are some tips to keep the device safe from the silent killer, electrostatic discharge, or static shocks if you like.

    Most of the time you cannot even feel the static passing between your body and an object, but it is happening all the time. Most shocks commonly sit around the 5000V - 7000V range. Sound like a lot? Nope, you can actually generate over 15, 000V on your person depending on your clothing and surroundings.

    These shocks have the potential to instantly kill a BlackBerry or any other exposed piece of electronics in your home. And as I say, you may never know it happened.

    Some useful tips to avoid this disaster:

    Clothing. Never ever wear anything that easily builds a static charge. Fleece, wool and polyester are some of the biggest offenders here.

    Never work on your device on carpet! Carpet is bad, lots of static can be generated there. The best surfaces are wood and tile, the absolute best is in fact concrete as it wicks away static charge.

    before starting, get all your tools together on the table, let's assume you're in the kitchen. Start by grounding yourself, touch a surface like the kitchen sink or exposed metal on the stove. These are grounded and will remove your static charge. Also touch any metal tools you will be using to the same surface to ground them too.

    Once you have the housing open, limit your contact with the components on the main board. As a precaution only handle them by the edges.

    By far the best thing to use is a static strap to ground you throughout the process, your local electronics supply store can sell you one pretty cheap. For home use I recommend he wrist strap that plugs into the grounding prong of a wall outlet.

    Try to keep any plastic tools that are not rated ESD safe away from the main board. Some plastic tools can very easily gain a charge and pose a threat.

    That's about it I think. Good luck and keep that 'Berry safe!

    sorry to notify you bro,
    but you are seriously crackberry.
    god bless you.

    12-16-09 02:47 AM
  7. jasonriot's Avatar
    I have formica counter tops. How bout if I lay a large flank of wood over them for a work surface.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    12-16-09 10:07 PM
  8. jasonriot's Avatar
    What kind of clothing is best to lower or eliminate esd problems.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    12-16-09 11:15 PM
  9. Branta's Avatar
    What kind of clothing is best to lower or eliminate esd problems.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Avoid man-made fiber like acrylic. Wool and silk are also good static generators. Cotton is a good choice, but the important point is to ensure a safe ground for the operator and work surface.

    Note that "safe" does not mean zero Ohms, it means a moderately high impedance in your path to ground so any current through you is limited if you are unlucky enough to contact mains power. A few MOhms to ground is usually considered acceptable minimum, small enough for static discharge but too high for AC mains to kill.
    12-29-09 07:23 PM
  10. jasonriot's Avatar
    Thank You.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    12-29-09 08:02 PM
  11. ryan.medrano's Avatar
    Well I don't think I would be taking apart my crackberry anytime soon, but if I did, I agree on the safety precautions on practicing this with the electric staticness. Good post.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    01-22-10 10:27 PM
  12. Radius's Avatar
    I have formica counter tops. How bout if I lay a large flank of wood over them for a work surface.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Wood is an insulator, not the best. For ESD you really need something that takes the charge away. In fact working on a grounded metal surface might be the best overall if you don't have a mat or anything else.

    You want to avoid isolating the device and hitting it with a charge.
    02-01-10 09:52 PM
  13. bluz's Avatar
    nicely done.I never knew of it.
    02-02-10 12:46 AM
  14. Branta's Avatar
    Wood is an insulator, not the best. For ESD you really need something that takes the charge away. In fact working on a grounded metal surface might be the best overall if you don't have a mat or anything else.
    I disagree. A simple metallic surface is not the best choice because it brings the risk of sudden discharge through the circuit board if the worker has built up a charge, and will allow short circuits if there's remaining charge in capacitors or a battery (usually a memory backup). Slow controlled leakage is best - conductive enough to prevent sudden electrostatic discharge but unable to pass large currents in a short circuit with lower voltages.
    02-07-10 04:44 PM
  15. jshuford's Avatar
    Thank you...lesson learned here!
    02-18-10 09:11 AM
  16. lexus_arc's Avatar
    this is the shocking truth! nice post, man!
    03-10-10 04:47 PM
  17. ronBurgandy's Avatar
    I've taken apart way too many 'berries and didn't know I should have any precaution!!, good to know, thanks!
    03-17-10 06:31 PM
  18. EnergyPlus's Avatar
    LOL!!! Sounds like it was a tough job, Pete, but dang, somebody had to do it! I have a great visual in my head, of this young kid going up to all the women saying "Excuse me, Ma'm, but are you wearing nylon undies, by any chance?" LOL!

    I live in Las Vegas. The dry climate here makes ES a daily occurrence year-round. It's almost second nature and often, we don't even think about it (unless we happen to get one of the real zingers). A few months ago, I had a friend from out of state here visiting and when she got up out of the chair to go to the kitchen, she casually put her hand on the wall as she passed under the arch...ZINGGGGG! That happens to me five times a day, I didn't even think to warn her. ESD are great, I never touch the inside of anything electronic without one. Even the outside can be a problem. I shorted the clock on my coffee pot one day (metal casing on the entire outside of the coffee maker) simply by touching it before grounding myself.

    As an aside, as a very young graduate engineer I was in charge of a prototype production line that was making very early FET transistors that were particularly prone to mortality by static. I was told by my suprvisor to check wether the ladies working on the line were wearing nylon underwear. The factory ladies made total mincemeat of Pete6, then age 21 and not very experienced.

    Static is very bad indeed for electronics.
    03-17-10 07:02 PM
  19. jbtarheel23's Avatar
    Thanks for this, really helpful stuff!
    04-01-10 03:16 PM
  20. skimdread's Avatar
    had no idea about all this thanks alot
    04-04-10 10:57 AM
  21. funnykindel's Avatar
    nice post....
    12-05-10 10:54 AM
  22. apalm8's Avatar
    Wow I never even considered this but it is great to know since I often like to change my housing/bezel etc. Thanks!
    01-13-11 11:16 PM
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