03-06-15 02:06 PM
50 12
tools
  1. gariac's Avatar
    Report: Google to launch wireless service this year | Ars Technica

    Also Sprint. Of course the last thing I want is Google sniffing my cellular use.

    Posted via CB10
    lift and barbarianthemadserb like this.
    01-21-15 06:07 PM
  2. raino's Avatar
    Android Central is going to need a lot of wipes.
    01-21-15 06:10 PM
  3. Denise in Los Angeles's Avatar
    Android Central is going to need a lot of wipes.
    OMG! Dying laughing....
    01-21-15 06:16 PM
  4. Ment's Avatar
    Wonder if Google is going to turn the Tmob $30 plan as their base plan paired with Google Voice/Hangouts.
    01-21-15 06:16 PM
  5. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Dunno if I like this development.

    Interesting.
    01-21-15 06:38 PM
  6. raino's Avatar
    I'm sure AT&T, Verizon, Sprint and Apple are going to appreciate the endeavor.
    01-21-15 06:42 PM
  7. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    I might be a bit myopic here, but the armchair CEO in me likes when OS makers stay somewhat out of the telecom business.

    Oh well.
    lift and raino like this.
    01-21-15 06:48 PM
  8. raino's Avatar
    I might be a bit myopic here, but the armchair CEO in me likes when OS makers stay somewhat out of the telecom business.

    Oh well.
    You have to keep in mind this is a carrier that posted losses in five of its last six quarters. Plus, the largest shareholder may be growing impatient for a positive ROI. They need the cash.
    01-21-15 07:04 PM
  9. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    You have to keep in mind this is a carrier that posted losses in five of its last six quarters. Plus, the largest shareholder may be growing impatient for a positive ROI. They need the cash.
    I hear ya, Raino. I am being selfish here. It makes sense from a Tmo point of view, and probably a Google point of view.
    01-21-15 07:59 PM
  10. raino's Avatar
    I hear ya, Raino. I am being selfish here. It makes sense from a Tmo point of view, and probably a Google point of view.
    Setting Verizon aside (given their general...lukewarm relationship with Google,) did Google not consider that AT&T and Sprint would not take too kindly to this, and if they then choose to double their push for iPhones (and maybe WP phones,and, heavens forbid, BlackBerry) out of vindication, there could be collateral damage to Android OEMs? Maybe I'm wrong and you could correct me on this, but I doubt Android users have that much loyalty to the operating system given a) the higher proportion of cheap vs. flagship devices in circulation (i.e. cost is the bigger factor, rather than a liking for Android,) and b) no single OEM--not even Samsung now--is quite setting the sales world on fire. I would love to be a fly in Mountain View, but they'd catch me turn me into a damn Borg.

    And then at TMO, where they've partnered up with Apple for their Test Drive initiative. What if Apple gets pissy/vindictive (totally unheard of, I know) and somehow decides to punish TMO?
    01-21-15 08:17 PM
  11. Ment's Avatar
    Google is going MVNO with BOTH Tmob and Sprint. AT&T and Verizon were probably also approached but probably couldn't agree to Googles low cost structure being a threat to their own plans. I expect the phones offered with the plans will actually be future model Sprint phones that can use Tmob GSM when you choose your carrier preference on signup.
    01-21-15 11:50 PM
  12. raino's Avatar
    5 reasons why a Google MVNO would fail - FierceWireless

    I definitely agree with #5 (Hellooo Motorola,) I agree with #3 and #2. #1 is a salient point (especially with the rumors/news floating around that a phone on this theoretical MVNO would switch between networks depending on coverage) with a bad example, #4 is kinda pushing it.
    01-27-15 05:06 PM
  13. gariac's Avatar
    The thing is Google is already a brand. That is half the battle. Further, it has geeky fanbois that will spread the gospel. (Think back to the days when they had Gmail "invites." ) Advertising? Got that covered. Technical problems? Eh, poach employees from the big boys.

    Multiple bands in phones? Not an issue with antenna tuners. (Hopefully Paratek, but there is competition.) This is something Google could accomplish. Even if the volume isn't high, if Google pays the NRE, who cares.

    I'm not ruling it out. We'll except for the 3.5GHz band. Lots of nearby radar to desense the radio. Radar is really nasty stuff to filter.

    Posted via CB10
    01-27-15 07:34 PM
  14. f0xG3's Avatar
    I'm not really surprised at this concept though.

    When I went to Korea, LG there not only made phones and consumer electronics, they also run a network called LG U+ that uses CDMA / LTE.

    Passport | SQW100-1/10.3.1.2072 | Globe PH
    01-27-15 07:41 PM
  15. Ment's Avatar
    5 reasons why a Google MVNO would fail - FierceWireless

    I definitely agree with #5 (Hellooo Motorola,) I agree with #3 and #2. #1 is a salient point (especially with the rumors/news floating around that a phone on this theoretical MVNO would switch between networks depending on coverage) with a bad example, #4 is kinda pushing it.
    I stopped taking the guy seriously at this ' Even if Google did manage to cram all of the radios for both carriers into a single phone, that phone would likely be bulky and overheat often as a result' lol He then updated the article to reflect the fact the Nexus 6 already has those bands.

    The product differentiator for Google will be using Google services: All Access/Youtube/Hangouts/Voice without a data penalty. Get a 1GB plan/price and effectively use 2GB and so on.
    01-27-15 07:47 PM
  16. raino's Avatar
    The thing is Google is already a brand. That is half the battle. Further, it has geeky fanbois that will spread the gospel. (Think back to the days when they had Gmail "invites." )
    Their brand doesn't necessarily encompass delivering on hardware though. They've sold Chromecasts pretty well, I suppose, but Nexus devices haven't exactly been sales records-shattering. They couldn't do much with Motorola (sold off to Lenovo,) and Nest was as big it was before Google bought them. And is it too soon to bring up Google Glass?

    Multiple bands in phones? Not an issue with antenna tuners. (Hopefully Paratek, but there is competition.) This is something Google could accomplish. Even if the volume isn't high, if Google pays the NRE, who cares.
    I stopped taking the guy seriously at this ' Even if Google did manage to cram all of the radios for both carriers into a single phone, that phone would likely be bulky and overheat often as a result' lol He then updated the article to reflect the fact the Nexus 6 already has those bands.
    Yeah, that was an ill-researched claim on his end. In addition to the two recent Nexus phones, the Verizon iPhone has the necessary CDMA bands, 5-15 LTE bands, a bunch of UMTS bands, and its thickness is what it is--i.e a non-issue. Point is, it can be done.

    I'm thinking if there's constant switching between Sprint and TMO networks, that would kill the battery real fast. Overheating might be a problem too, if the phone's searching for CDMA, GSM and LTE signal. I guess the way they'd go about it would be like how roaming agreements work, except in this case, it wouldn't be roaming because they'd be switching people from one paid-for spectrum to another.

    The product differentiator for Google will be using Google services: All Access/Youtube/Hangouts/Voice without a data penalty. Get a 1GB plan/price and effectively use 2GB and so on.
    So they'd be pro-net neutrality, until it suits their purpose? That would be the final nail in "Do No Evil," I suppose.
    01-27-15 08:45 PM
  17. gariac's Avatar
    Their brand doesn't necessarily encompass delivering on hardware though. They've sold Chromecasts pretty well, I suppose, but Nexus devices haven't exactly been sales records-shattering. They couldn't do much with Motorola (sold off to Lenovo,) and Nest was as big it was before Google bought them. And is it too soon to bring up Google Glass?





    Yeah, that was an ill-researched claim on his end. In addition to the two recent Nexus phones, the Verizon iPhone has the necessary CDMA bands, 5-15 LTE bands, a bunch of UMTS bands, and its thickness is what it is--i.e a non-issue. Point is, it can be done.

    I'm thinking if there's constant switching between Sprint and TMO networks, that would kill the battery real fast. Overheating might be a problem too, if the phone's searching for CDMA, GSM and LTE signal. I guess the way they'd go about it would be like how roaming agreements work, except in this case, it wouldn't be roaming because they'd be switching people from one paid-for spectrum to another.



    So they'd be pro-net neutrality, until it suits their purpose? That would be the final nail in "Do No Evil," I suppose.
    I think the phone stays in the preferred mode (LTE) most of the time, if only to get the data on the neighboring towers for free. Working multiple networks simultaneously is tricky. Just look at the issues of Verizon phones working voice and data. Tuning an antenna for multi band use is one thing, but adding filters and such for simultaneous use is another.

    I'm with "Ment" on tying up Google services, especially bandwith hogging services.

    Google bought Moto to learn the biz and to get the "moonshot" team. I don't think they wanted to be in the phone biz forever.

    I've lost track of the details, but an example of doing something just to learn the business is the construction of the Rio casino. It was built by a construction company rather than a traditional gambling (er gaming) outfit. The construction firm wanted to learn the business from the inside in order to be the premier construction firm. They eventually sold the casino because that wasn't their core business. I can see Google thinking like that. I don't think they even want to be in the ISP business, but they need to kick the behinds of the traditional ISPs.



    Posted via CB10
    01-27-15 09:15 PM
  18. Ment's Avatar
    So they'd be pro-net neutrality, until it suits their purpose? That would be the final nail in "Do No Evil," I suppose.
    They could go another way like a reward system, either with data or Gplay credits. Make it so 3rd parties could participate even though Google would be 99% of it since they aren't looking to profit directly off the MVNO.

    Does roaming drain battery alot? If not the carrier switching between each other and wifi should be doable without greatly impacting the battery life of the device.
    raino likes this.
    01-28-15 11:05 AM
  19. gariac's Avatar
    They could go another way like a reward system, either with data or Gplay credits. Make it so 3rd parties could participate even though Google would be 99% of it since they aren't looking to profit directly off the MVNO.

    Does roaming drain battery alot? If not the carrier switching between each other and wifi should be doable without greatly impacting the battery life of the device.
    I've never been in a situation where the roaming cell and the T-mobile cell overlap. Generally you lose T-mobile, have nothing, the phone goes into scan mode, and sometime later you it find the roaming partner. This assumes you are on the move.

    The key here is one service is lost before the hunt begins. That is different from being on Tmob and looking for another carrier. On my Z10, if I do a scan, I lose data service from Tmob.

    Wifi is different since the phone is built to do wifi and cellular at the same time.

    Now when you go in engineering mode, the phone has a signal strength indication on the neighboring cell, and that is done without losing the serving cell. Maybe the phone has two receivers?

    Posted via CB10
    01-28-15 02:16 PM
  20. raino's Avatar
    They could go another way like a reward system, either with data or Gplay credits. Make it so 3rd parties could participate even though Google would be 99% of it since they aren't looking to profit directly off the MVNO.
    Interesting. I'd like to see how they would pull something off without violating net neutrality, or upping the mining of customers' data/information for monetization.

    Speaking of monetizing customer information, can Google "listen in" on phone calls without violating wiretap/consent laws? I know they offer some kind of a VM transcription service for GV calls, but I'm not sure if those are used for advertising.

    Does roaming drain battery alot? If not the carrier switching between each other and wifi should be doable without greatly impacting the battery life of the device.
    The phone's constantly pinging to figure out which tower to "connect" to. In the presence of LTE but absence of voLTE, this means your phone connects to a) LTE for data, and b) CDMA or UMTS for voice and texts. And if it scans every network on every frequency that the SIM card recognizes that would be a lot. Which makes me wonder if customers of MVNOs who don't have access to LTE networks see better battery life...

    https://gigaom.com/2012/02/17/why-lt...ttery-that-is/
    01-28-15 09:22 PM
  21. Ment's Avatar
    Interesting. I'd like to see how they would pull something off without violating net neutrality, or upping the mining of customers' data/information for monetization.

    Speaking of monetizing customer information, can Google "listen in" on phone calls without violating wiretap/consent laws? I know they offer some kind of a VM transcription service for GV calls, but I'm not sure if those are used for advertising.
    They can listen in on the mic for the purposes of Google Now but once it leaves the phone they'd be subject to the restrictions as other companies.

    The phone's constantly pinging to figure out which tower to "connect" to. In the presence of LTE but absence of voLTE, this means your phone connects to a) LTE for data, and b) CDMA or UMTS for voice and texts. And if it scans every network on every frequency that the SIM card recognizes that would be a lot. Which makes me wonder if customers of MVNOs who don't have access to LTE networks see better battery life...

    https://gigaom.com/2012/02/17/why-lt...ttery-that-is/
    When you are in a fringe area now does the phone constantly ping to the roaming carrier? Perhaps Google has a learning function that plots towers in the area you frequent and puts in a roadmap so it doesn't have to constantly ping. Example your work is Tmobile but home is Sprint.
    01-29-15 03:58 PM
  22. raino's Avatar
    When you are in a fringe area now does the phone constantly ping to the roaming carrier? Perhaps Google has a learning function that plots towers in the area you frequent and puts in a roadmap so it doesn't have to constantly ping. Example your work is Tmobile but home is Sprint.
    It wouldn't ping the roaming carrier unless you have network selection mode set to automatic and your "home" carrier's signal is too weak, practically non-existent. But then, IDK if under manual your phone will still kill the battery by scanning for tower's it's supposed to connect to...

    The problem IMO would be exacerbated by "home" network for the SIM card (which is how I think this is controlled) being two networks. So even in times of good coverage, the phone would be checking in with Sprint and TMO towers.
    01-29-15 08:26 PM
  23. lift's Avatar
    Of course the last thing I want is Google sniffing my cellular use.
    LOL, same here.
    02-16-15 09:42 PM
  24. barbarianthemadserb's Avatar
    Wow, thanks for the thread OP. This is a very interesting and informative discussion. Thank you all responders for your thought provoking and insightful responses. This is the way all threads should read!
    02-17-15 04:04 AM
  25. Kurdis Blough's Avatar
    As a consumer I'm all for it. Google fiber is coming to my city. Unlimited data at insane speeds for the same price I'm paying Comcast. I can't wait.

    I never understood why individuals would go against their own interest to support corporations. Did you guys boost each other up to buy tanking BlackBerry shares?

    Don't see how bundling services like YouTube and other Google products and excluding them from the users data cap violates net neutrality. As long as the google traffic is not given preference over other services, I don't see where there's a conflict. Google sells you data and excludes their own services from your data cap. Correct me if I'm wrong but doesn't violate net neutrality.

    Not sure why so many folks around here have this unconditional love for BlackBerry or how it even relates to hatred for evil Google.

    I crack up when I read half of the crap on this forum. It's hilarious.
    Can they listen to your phone calls? Are you for real?


    !
    02-17-15 07:46 AM
50 12

Similar Threads

  1. Back to BBOS & BBM! New Friends?
    By RitzD in forum Discover BBM Friends
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 01-24-15, 07:56 PM
  2. Things you'll like to send back to Canada (for the Int'l user)
    By Acvdm in forum Rehab & Off-Topic Lounge
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 01-22-15, 02:20 PM
  3. Google drive for BlackBerry 10
    By Originalloverman in forum General BlackBerry Discussion
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 01-22-15, 10:04 AM
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-21-15, 03:40 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-21-15, 02:25 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD