1. Sensesfail99's Avatar
    Okay so monday night I took 2 tylenol with codeine I got from my mom.... I had a severe tooth ache and I had a dentist spot the next day to have a tooth pulled and a root canal.... The dentist prescribed me vicodin, so I'm not worried about it, but lucky me I get pulled up for a **** test this morning.... I have a prescription to explain the vicodin.... But nothing to explain the tylenol with codeine... How long does it take to get out of your system? I'm scared.... I hope I'm worked up over nothing, but I seem to have the worst luck ever! Anyone have any good info?

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    10-08-08 11:35 PM
  2. Baroness110902's Avatar
    fess up, say what you said here....the follow up with the vicodin makes it obvious that you were in pain...

    I used to work HR and I can't imagine what kind of employer wouldn't be reasonable in *this* case...

    good luck.
    10-08-08 11:41 PM
  3. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    Just walk in like House and say "I'm in pain you moron!"

    But yeah, don't try to hide it. That just makes it worse, because then they think you were trying to cover it up, which is the reason why companies test you. It's not illegal to take drugs for medical needs.

    Oh yeah, if they ask, tell the truth. If they don't, don't bring it up... it probably wasn't an issue, why make it one.
    10-09-08 12:08 AM
  4. thatirishguy's Avatar
    Honesty is definately best policy....you have a legit reason and now a legit script for pain meds. Codiene can stay in your system for up to 14 days(depending on your bodys metabolism) There's no reason they shouldn't give you a pass on this!

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    10-09-08 12:31 AM
  5. exelant's Avatar
    They are both opiates. I believe they will test the same in initial testing, so you should be fine. Show them the prescription for vicodin and they won't do any indepth testing to identify a specific substance becuse you're allowed a narcotic. They will check dates so I hope you filled that script before you tested. You lucked out this time. I don't need to tell you now, but don't borrow meds if you are in a random testing program. I run my division's testing program and this happens all the time. Most of my people who make this mistake get 12 weeks of classes they have to pay for.

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    10-09-08 01:18 AM
  6. amazinglygraceless's Avatar
    Honesty is definately best policy....you have a legit reason and now a legit script for pain meds. Codiene can stay in your system for up to 14 days(depending on your bodys metabolism) There's no reason they shouldn't give you a pass on this!
    Aside from the fact that the first med was not actually prescribed to him.
    That could be problematic to say the least. Were I the HR Director, I'd treat
    taking someone else's meds as a test fail. Guess it's a good thing I am in the
    Finance Department
    Last edited by amazinglygraceless; 10-09-08 at 01:23 AM.
    10-09-08 01:21 AM
  7. Pinkbuddy's Avatar
    They are both opiates. I believe they will test the same in initial testing, so you should be fine. Show them the prescription for vicodin and they won't do any indepth testing to identify a specific substance becuse you're allowed a narcotic. They will check dates so I hope you filled that script before you tested. You lucked out this time. I don't need to tell you now, but don't borrow meds if you are in a random testing program. I run my division's testing program and this happens all the time. Most of my people who make this mistake get 12 weeks of classes they have to pay for.

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    You are correct Ex... and the testing that we do (in my experience in the hospital) are not opioid specific. The only time that a specific drug is being tested is when poison is suspected. Cross your fingers and hope that your job doesn't have tests that are that specific. Which I highly doubt.
    10-09-08 02:19 AM
  8. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    Aside from the fact that the first med was not actually prescribed to him.
    That could be problematic to say the least. Were I the HR Director, I'd treat
    taking someone else's meds as a test fail
    . Guess it's a good thing I am in the
    Finance Department
    Are you kidding me? Like you've never done that before in your life. It's freaking Tylenol with a boost for extra pain. It's not like he's ODing on opiates. Geez man, technically speaking taking a left over drug months after your prescription has expired, even if it's written for you, is breaking your HR law as well. I think perhaps one needs to reevalulate what work drug screening should really look for and when something else is found, should really look at the background and current state of the individual before they jump the gun.
    Last edited by JRSCCivic98; 10-09-08 at 10:12 AM.
    10-09-08 10:10 AM
  9. Rose6446's Avatar
    ummmm.........good luck Tony. I dunno what the results will be here! Could go either way prolly. I'm thinking the results will indeed show the drugs. Just be honest if it becomes an issue, I dunno that I would volunteer the info though
    10-09-08 10:58 AM
  10. amazinglygraceless's Avatar
    Are you kidding me? Like you've never done that before in your life. It's freaking Tylenol with a boost for extra pain. It's not like he's ODing on opiates. Geez man, technically speaking taking a left over drug months after your prescription has expired, even if it's written for you, is breaking your HR law as well. I think perhaps one needs to reevalulate what work drug screening should really look for and when something else is found, should really look at the background and current state of the individual before they jump the gun.
    Let's see if I can unbunch your panties.

    First: No, In my entire life I have never taken a medication that was
    not prescribed to me. Plain and simple.

    Two: My stance on this is that if a person is taking meds that are
    not prescribed specifically for them then yes, it is a test failure.

    Three: I don't need to reevaluate a damn thing as I am not the one
    condoning a practice that could be potentially injurious (physically and
    from an employment standpoint) to the person engaging in such an act.

    Four: There was no "gun jumping". The OP asked for an opinion and I gave
    mine. His background and current state are irrelevant as I don't actually
    know him and can't attest to the veracity of either.
    In fact the tester probably doesn't and can't either.
    Last edited by amazinglygraceless; 10-09-08 at 01:04 PM.
    10-09-08 01:02 PM
  11. judi912's Avatar
    Don't they test for certain drugs such as pot, coke and meth?? Sorry, this really doesn't answer your question.

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    10-09-08 01:05 PM
  12. exelant's Avatar
    They do test for specific classes of drugs. If you smoke hash, it will show up as pot. The tests to identify specific drugs in a class are expensive and most employers don't spend that kind of money if there is a reason for a positive test, as the OP has a valid opiate prescription, he'll be fine. Now if he was in law enforcement or a pilot, they'd be doing the in-depth testing. It is a good lesson learned for the OP.

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    10-10-08 07:00 AM
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