04-05-09 09:01 AM
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  1. 12MaNy's Avatar
    yeah me to ,That particular lay out seems to be pretty popular...Some supermodel has it but I cant remember her name.
    Finding an original tatt nowadays is like trying to sink two in one hole at the same time while your playing pool. You just have to come up with different variations of what's already been done. I like the layout she has.


    yea well i like my tattoo..
    Me too
    03-15-09 07:16 PM
  2. thinkamp's Avatar
    I should hope so...after all it,s there for life.

    Cool tat
    haha yea i loveee it!
    gonna get some other stuff done on my side...just dont know what yet.
    03-15-09 07:17 PM
  3. thinkamp's Avatar




    Me too
    thanks jasonnnn!
    03-15-09 07:18 PM
  4. editionfws's Avatar
    Yours isn't loading for me thinkamp but I'll try again soon.

    But I'll take before pics, and pics every 3 to 4 weeks and a pic when it's done too. I would use wreckingbalm I just can't afford it right now.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    03-15-09 10:30 PM
  5. editionfws's Avatar
    It loaded now, I like it a lot. !

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    03-15-09 10:32 PM
  6. greeneyedmonster's Avatar
    I have only 9 so far. I have a bust of scooby on my upper right chest for me love of old school cartoons. I have the St. Cassedy greatful dead dancing bear on my right upper arm for my love of music. Below that is my female jester that is crying to remind me that only fools and girls cry. Then on my lower right arm is the start of my 1/4 sleeves with kenji symbols for hate and fire that contradict the ones on my left arm that are symbols for love and rain. Then above them on my left arm is my oldest sons intials. Then at the upper most portion of my right arm is a tribal symbol I drew to remind me of my friendships I had in school that would carry throughout life no matter which direction we shall go and It has held to be true. After many years over seas and 10 years out of school. We still are friends. The scrolls are unfinished work that I will only let the artist the started them finish, but that artist is 36 hours away from where I live now. So when I get them finished it will be worth the time.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    03-15-09 10:44 PM
  7. chuckz28's Avatar
    Sweet patriotic tat there Dostovel. I have a tat on my back that says "Made in the USA" written in the font on the Dollar bill. Looking to get one on Arm that says "We the People" written like the constitution. Only other tat I have is my initials on my other arm in a way I designed myself. Sorry no pics.
    03-16-09 02:34 AM
  8. 12MaNy's Avatar
    I have an "M" tattooed on each arse cheek so that when I do cartwheels, it says "WOW"......"MOM"......."WOW"........"MOM"......... ...
    03-16-09 02:58 AM
  9. roeod4's Avatar
    Wow!

    I missed a lot of really good ink this weekend. Great tats everybody!
    03-16-09 10:44 AM
  10. SevereDeceit's Avatar
    Like the tat Trixie...
    03-16-09 10:46 AM
  11. 12MaNy's Avatar
    Wow!

    I missed a lot of really good ink this weekend. Great tats everybody!

    Thanks! Want me to do a couple of naked cartwheels so you can get the full affect?
    03-16-09 11:40 AM
  12. roeod4's Avatar
    Thanks! Want me to do a couple of naked cartwheels so you can get the full affect?
    That is quite alright.
    03-16-09 12:48 PM
  13. garbagefairy1967's Avatar
    Thanks SD! Truly one of my favs....
    03-16-09 03:38 PM
  14. Blahzee's Avatar
    do any of your tattoos have significant meaning or did u just get them to have a tattoo, just for the **** of it?
    03-16-09 04:24 PM
  15. SevereDeceit's Avatar
    do any of your tattoos have significant meaning or did u just get them to have a tattoo, just for the **** of it?
    Obviously they have a meaning to them or they wouldn't have gotten them, no wonder you live in off-topic, you wouldn't last a minute on the forums here...
    03-16-09 04:43 PM
  16. roeod4's Avatar
    do any of your tattoos have significant meaning or did u just get them to have a tattoo, just for the **** of it?
    All tattoos have meaning. It doesn't matter if it is obvious to people viewing it or not. It may not even be obvious to the person who has it, but it still has meaning in most cases.

    Tattoo Designs & Symbols - tattoo meanings & explanations. Tattoos for girls, tattoo design ideas for men
    Tattoo Meanings inspire Tattoo Ideas and Tattoo Designs

    This one on my leg comes from my love of poker and card playing in general. I actually won the money to pay for the five and half hours of work by playing poker. It was the single largest pot that I have ever won and I marked the occasion with the tattoo.


    This smaller sparrow or swallow that I have represents home. Sailors used to get them because seeing birds meant that they were close to land which usually meant that they were close to home.


    This kind of tribal design that I have on my back is something that my wife and both got. The design is of an Ankh which is the Egyptian hieroglyphic for eternal life. It has a heart looped at the top which makes it represent eternal love.
    03-16-09 05:02 PM
  17. Blahzee's Avatar
    i just dont understand why people get like stars or butterflies, flowers, fairys, skulls,unicorns and other dumb things. do they do it just to have a picture on them or they like them for some strange reason. i think if u want a tattoo it should have a personal meaning to it. thats just me a lot of people are corny.

    i post on here most of the time because i dont have a use for the other topics yet. my phone seems to be working fine so far. come to think of it im getting a little bored with my bb so maybe i'll see what the other topics have.
    : *
    03-16-09 05:04 PM
  18. Blahzee's Avatar
    All tattoos have meaning. It doesn't matter if it is obvious to people viewing it or not. It may not even be obvious to the person who has it, but it still has meaning in most cases.

    Tattoo Designs & Symbols - tattoo meanings & explanations. Tattoos for girls, tattoo design ideas for men
    Tattoo Meanings inspire Tattoo Ideas and Tattoo Designs

    This one on my leg comes from my love of poker and card playing in general. I actually won the money to pay for the five and half hours of work by playing poker. It was the single largest pot that I have ever won and I marked the occasion with the tattoo.


    This smaller sparrow or swallow that I have represents home. Sailors used to get them because seeing birds meant that they were close to land which usually meant that they were close to home.


    This kind of tribal design that I have on my back is something that my wife and both got. The design is of an Ankh which is the Egyptian hieroglyphic for eternal life. It has a heart looped at the top which makes it represent eternal love.

    yea your tats are cool. the bird is a lil feminine though, no offense.
    03-16-09 05:07 PM
  19. roeod4's Avatar
    i just dont understand why people get like stars or butterflies, flowers, fairys, skulls,unicorns and other dumb things. do they do it just to have a picture on them or they like them for some strange reason. i think if u want a tattoo it should have a personal meaning to it. thats just me a lot of people are corny.

    i post on here most of the time because i dont have a use for the other topics yet. my phone seems to be working fine so far. come to think of it im getting a little bored with my bb so maybe i'll see what the other topics have.
    : *
    Not that I believe for one minute that you will read this, but others may find it informative and interesting.


    Stars - Stars are often encountered as symbols, and many cases the meaning of a particular star symbol may depend upon the number points it has, and sometimes the orientation of these points as well. As a light shining in the darkness, the star is often considered a symbol of truth, of the spirit and of hope. The symbol of the star embodies the concept of the divine spark within each of us. Their nocturnal nature leads stars to represent the struggle against the forces of darkness and the unknown.

    Nautical Stars - The nautical star is a very old modern tattoo, going back at least a century or more. Back in the days of yore, before modern navigation, sailors would navigate in part by the stars in the night skies, in particular the North Star in the Northern Hemisphere, and various other constellations of stars in the night sky. In the Southern Hemisphere, sailors had to use different stars and the Southern Cross became quite well-known. Sailors would then tattoo nautical stars on them because they relied on the stars to take them home, and being superstitious, they hoped their star tattoos would get them home safely as well.
    Compass stars are also popular for this reason. The nautical stars were originally used by sailors to help guide their way as they sailed through the night. They relied upon the stars to protect them and bring them home safely.
    A lot of soldiers get nautical stars for the same reason... protection. It is a symbol of protection and guidance. It was a very popular tattoo among sailors.
    So a case could be made that the nautical star tattoo, or a tattoo of any star for that matter, would be a symbol of guidance. Now as time has passed the nautical stars represent the direction of one's life, for those of us who are not sailors but still need guidance.
    Some say that if the nautical star is pointed upwards they have a higher outlook on life and so on.
    The meaning of the Nautical star is to create your own path, but use the stars as a guide when you are lost or scared.

    Butterflies - One of the most popular tattoo design choices for women, the Butterfly reveals the feminine influence in tattoo culture. Generally speaking, butterflies are an overwhelmingly female tattoo design. Because of the butterfly’s short life span, many ancient peoples saw it as emblematic of the impermanent. Its physical beauty and its fluttering from flower to flower seeking nectar have made it synonymous with the more unstable and superficial aspects of the human soul.
    In Greek mythology, Psyche was represented in art with butterfly wings. It’s all about the airborne soul – and the caterpillar emerging from its cocoon, transformed from an earth-bound to an aerial entity, is the classic metaphor. To the Greeks, a human soul emerged each time a butterfly emerged from its cocoon. Diverse cultures looked upon the Butterfly as a symbol of transformation, regeneration and flight. Souls were carried by the Butterfly from earth to heaven, or in some cases were believed to be the souls themselves returning to earth.
    Butterfly goddesses have emerged in places as far apart as Minoan Crete and Toltec Mexico. Some of these deities were believed to be the personification of certain butterflies, and were regarded as symbols of beauty, love, flowers, and the spirits of the dead. They were also looked upon as the patrons of women who died in childbirth and warriors who fell in battle. At the other end of the spectrum, one of the Butterfly deities in ancient Mexico was the goddess of war and human sacrifice.
    So, the Butterfly is not entirely the exclusive domain of the feminine. The Roman Emperor, Augustus, took it as his personal symbol, and the warrior priests of the Mexican Popolucas peoples sported the Butterfly as a motif on their breastplates. Their Butterfly was also the symbol of fire.
    In Japan, the Butterfly, ready to fly after its long spell in the cocoon and spreading its brand new wings, is a popular symbol for young girls. It represents emerging beauty and grace, with the added notice to regard change as joyful, not traumatic. Likewise, the Native American honours the Butterfly as an emblem of guidance in change. In China, it is still a popular symbol of marital bliss and conjugal harmony.
    Delightful, magical and transformational, the Butterfly reminds its admirers of the mystery of nature and the richness of human imagination.

    Flowers - Flowers as tattoo designs and symbols can be far more than just pretty pictures on pretty girls. Flowers are the embodiment of nature and concise symbols of the cycle of birth, life, procreation, death and rebirth. Specific flowers have come to represent a myriad of different beliefs in different cultures. In the East, the lotus flower has tremendous spiritual significance, as does the rose in the West. Similarly, the tremendous spectrum of colors present in flowers can have symbolic importance; white for purity, red for passion, or to represent the blood of Christ are but a few examples.
    The shape of the flower, it's receptive cup-like form and it's passive role in fertilization, has been long been seen as a symbol of the feminine.
    The symbolism of flowers remains largely hidden from us today. We encounter it daily, however, in art, literature, folklore, and mythology, the mystery and magnificence waiting to be found. It is also found in the old remedies of apothecaries and herbalists, for flowers not only brought joy, happiness and messages of love, but were used to heal the sick and encourage the dying during their last journey through this life.
    Flowers have inspired us for as long as we could see, smell and touch them. As girls’ names, they became synonymous with sweetness, beauty and healing, and with even more abstract qualities such as nobility, serenity, and innocence. Not only were flowers a source of delight and cheer in themselves, but they lent themselves to the imagination and fancy of the human mind. Their color, shape, scent and unique characteristics have given rise to myriad myths and characters whose names were synonymous with the flowers themselves.
    Next to the ubiquitous rose, the iris is the most highly symbolized flower. As the Greek goddess of the rainbow, Iris transported women’s souls to the underworld, becoming the flower associated with death. Armed with a valid passport to the dark side, Iris became a messenger of the gods and stood for ‘good news’ or a ‘message’. Its three petals came to symbolize faith, valor, and wisdom.
    With Christianity, the triple petals of the Iris came to symbolize the Holy Trinity. The colors of the Iris – blue and white -- became associated with the Virgin Mary. The Archangel Gabriel is depicted holding the flower in his hand when he appeared to her, establishing it as a symbol of purity. In Medieval England, noblewomen often took the Iris as a symbol of virtue and had its image incorporated into a personal seal. In the fifth century, the French monarchy adopted the Iris into the heraldic coat of arms -- the fleur de lys -- which remains synonymous with all things French.
    The Violet, Hyacinth, and Narcissus are all flowers with names derived from Greek mythology. The Violet, for instance, took its name from the little nymph Io, much loved by Zeus. To avoid his wife’s jealousy, Zeus changed Io into a heifer and put her in a field of sweet violets -- all she could eat! The modest Violet became a great favorite through the ages with its sweet perfume and heart-shaped leaves. During Medieval times it was seen as a symbol of faithful love, humility and chastity. In Victorian London, flower girls in the streets did a brisk business selling bunches of violets to the young ladies of the day. In ancient Rome, however, the violet was a funeral flower and symbol of peace. Even today, the color purple is a symbol for mourning.
    The Anemone and Poppy are two more flowers associated with death and sleep. The latter, of course, has come to symbolize fallen soldiers of the two World Wars. The Anemone is featured in the myth of Aphrodite mourning the death of Adonis -- the flower sprung from her tears. Fairies sleep in the closed petals of the Anemone, waking as the petals open in the morning, while the Opium Poppy became the symbol of sleep and oblivion. But the Anemone has a whole different meaning in the folklore of the middle ages, when it was a symbol of protection against evil.
    The natural simplicity of the Daisy,, Snowdrop and Bluebell has inspired lovers, artists, and poets to sing their praises, but all carry a warning. The Daisy may be a symbol of innocence, but it warns that a suitor may be untrue. The Bluebell, while connoting constancy and everlasting love, is known to be an unlucky flower to pick. Likewise the Snowdrop, which symbolizes hope and the return to life after the long winter, is highly poisonous and unlucky to bring into the house.
    Flowers were once the lover’s sweetest weapon at a time when propriety forbade passionate declarations of love. A bouquet contained coded intentions, and the Victorians became especially skilled in the secret language of flowers. The Carnation, Honeysuckle, and Primrose each had something unique to say whenever they appeared in a bouquet. The white Carnation, believed to be an aphrodisiac, symbolized betrothal, love, and fertility, and became a popular wedding flower. The yellow Carnation was reserved for rejection, and red for an aching heart. Honeysuckle meant undying love, and its perfume provoked dreams of passion. An offering of the tiny primrose was a symbol of first love, and was the sacred flower of Freya, the Norse goddess of love.
    The popular Pansy was also called “Heartsease” for its ability to cure love sickness. Carry this flower to ensure your sweetheart’s love.

    Fairy / Fairies - The Fairy as a tattoo design can be as simple as a take-off on the often overpowering presence of corporate America in pop-culture, think Tinkerbell and Disney creatures, or it harkens back to a rich history of story, myth and folklore. Fairies in literature are often the personification of human wishes and desire in the form of little people with magical powers. As a tattoo design they can be symbols of youthful innocence and a desire to retain a child-like imagination, wonder and awe.
    The very word fairy, derived from the Latin "fata", or fate underlies the use of fairies in literature and myth to explain the workings of destiny, with it's often unpredictable nature of gifts and disappointments. The use of supernatural beings, who often meddle in human affairs in fairy tales, has created a genre of story-telling that is rich in symbolism and that lays bare the psychological and social challenges as we pass through the stages of childhood to adulthood. The presence of magic makes fairies a favorite of children and as a tattoo design they are a potent symbol of our youth.

    Skulls - Skulls are represented in a number of tattoo design genres, and a classic tattoo design that has been popular for generations of tattoo enthusiasts. Nautical Tattoos with the Jolly Roger, or famed pirate's flag of Skull and Crossed Bones, Old School Tattoos, New School Tattoos, Bio-Mechanical and every School of Tattoos in between.
    Skull symbolism is instinctive in human nature. The human mind is primed to recognize faces, and so eager to find them that it can see faces in a few dots and lines or punctuation marks; the face that looks back from a human skull cannot avoid recognition as having been once human. Moreover, a human skull, with its eyes much larger than in life, displays a degree of neoteny (think of kittens, puppies and babies, no, seriously), which humans often find visually appealing. Yet, a skull is obviously dead. As such, human skulls have a visual appeal beyond the other bones of the human skeleton, and can fascinate even as they repel.
    One look at a skull and we can see death staring at us from those big empty sockets. It’s not surprising then that the skull is known all over the world as a symbol of death. In many cultures, it is held up as a reminder of our own mortality or, in the universal Latin, a memento mori - a memento of mortality.
    In the play Hamlet, playwright William Shakespeare uses a skull to great effect. When Hamlet discovers Yorick's skull, the King's former Court Jester, in the graveyard in the first scene of Act V, he speaks directly to the skull as he fixates on death’s inevitability and the disintegration of the body. The physical object of the skull is used to symbolize the themes of mortality and death presented in the play. In the end, none of us can escape death and even Kings are eaten by worms.
    In Christian art and culture, the skull has been seen as a symbol of eternity, repentance, and human vanity and, therefore, a reminder to keep to the straight and narrow. It appears in medieval religious paintings as Adam’s skull placed at the foot of the Cross and symbolizing the Redemption. An ancient symbol of the skull with a serpent crawling through the sockets was the symbol of knowledge and immortality. The serpent in the skull is also a favourite emblem denoting ‘knowledge surviving death’. Many great Renaissance masterpieces prominently feature skulls, and most portraits of Saints, Cardinals, Popes and Royalty contained a skull as a reminder of the importance of living a virtuous life.
    Historically, the skull was a popular symbol of triumph over the enemy, and a warning to the people defeated in battle. Collections of skulls might be stacked by the victors in public places, as an obvious declaration of victory and grim reminder of the losses of the vanquished. It was also worn as a trophy and even drunk out of by conquering kings. Centuries ago, heads were stuck on pikes at Traitors’ Gate in London, and left to rot -- a dire warning to all who walked by. The skull, or Totenkopf was the Nazi SS insignia in WW2, a symbol to be feared, but when tattooed on the arm of a biker outlaw, it is a death-defying symbol believed to cheat death. In New Guinea, skulls were placed in the rafters of the medicine house as a reminder of death always present in life. Ancient Pompeii came up with the image of the skull crowned with the spirit level, the carpenter’s favorite tool, suggesting Death as the great leveler.
    The skull could also get fancy. There are plenty of scenes of talking skulls in folk history, all carrying a message or reminder of death and bad behavior. In Mexico you can see grinning skulls dressed up in feathers and hats, such as found in Mexican art. On the Day of the Dead, you might even be eating a skull made of sugar and chocolate. But skulls on gravestones are not as popular today as they were in Victorian times. Death was big business for sculptors and masons, and the skull in various combinations with crosses, roses, and wings were not only a reminder of mortality but also of the flight of the soul, resurrection and eternity.
    In Buddhism and Hinduism, skulls can be seen in their religious art. The Buddhist Lord of the Dead, Yama, has five skulls around his head, signifying the conquest of anger, greed, pride, envy and ignorance. Kali, the Hindu Goddess of Death wears a necklace of skulls.
    Today, the skull is as popular as it ever was. In movies, games, literature, comics, and of course, tattoos, the skull continues to gather different symbolic implications as the creative imagination of the artist lets loose. Some designs are humorous, some macabre and threatening, but always Death is part of the picture.

    Unicorns - The Unicorn was a popular tattoo in the late sixties and through the seventies, no doubt in part to its symbolic representation of a utopian world of peace, magic and spiritual mysticism, where all things are possible. Other popular 'magical' tattoos of that period were dragons, winged horses such as Pegasus and a wide assortment of Wizards, Sorcerers and other Magicians, conjuring up the wide popularity of Tolkien's Lord of the Rings Trilogy. The unicorn is a popular creature of our fantasy that symbolizes beauty, mystery, nobility, strength, and a fierce temperament tamable only by pure and chaste maidens.
    Beasts of myths and legends usually arise out of human fear, but not the Unicorn. This horsy, one-horned creature (sometimes seen sporting the Billy goat beard) has always been a benign being, if a little fierce, sometimes. The Unicorn came to be associated with sweet maidens, chaste behaviour, and the Virgin Mary. The story goes that upon seeing the Virgin Mary, the Unicorn laid its head in her lap. But the Unicorn had previously appeared in the Bible as a wild and untamable beast.
    In Medieval lore, only a virgin maiden could tame the Unicorn. As a noble and somewhat mysterious figure, the Unicorn became an emblem of marital fidelity. Not surprisingly, the horn of this beautiful creature was believed to be an aphrodisiac, but capturing one proved difficult, since the Virgin Mary was usually sitting beside him. Not surprising, then, that the Unicorn had a nose for telling who was a real virgin, and who not. Only a true maiden could mount the Unicorn.
    Tales of hunting the Unicorn appear in tapestries, even today. One of the most famous -- from the Gothic era -- hangs at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Once again, it tells the story of a virgin maiden who entraps him with her charms and brings him to dwell happily with her in the castle grounds.
    In heraldry from the 15th century, the Unicorn is depicted with the lion’s tail and the goat’s cloven hooves. This symbolizes the ability to break free from bondage. The additional image of a broken chain implies that, once free, the creature cannot be captured again. In Scotland, you’ll see two Unicorns on the royal coat of arms. And the British coat of arms features the Unicorn appearing with the Lion.
    Other than the rhinoceros, there is no reliable record of any one-horned creature, living or extinct. Legends probably grew from encounters between early man and the rhino. Early sailors to the icy far reaches of the North Atlantic occasionally tried to pass off the tusk of the narwhale as a unicorn horn.



    You will have to clarify what you mean by "other dumb things", because it appears that you find just about everything dumb.
    03-16-09 05:20 PM
  20. roeod4's Avatar
    yea your tats are cool. the bird is a lil feminine though, no offense.
    lol No offense taken. I am comfortable enough in my manhood and hetero status that something being feminine is not a concern to me. Look at my avatar, you cannot imagine the number of guys that have sent me PMs telling me how "purty" I am. I am sure that many people on here think I am female because of that and none of them have stopped to think that it might be my wife.
    03-16-09 05:30 PM
  21. Heavy Fluid's Avatar
    I got that skull because getting a tattooed covered severely limits you as to what you can get. It does mean something to me. I sat down and had a vision with the artist that drew it, and together, we came up with the idea.
    03-16-09 05:30 PM
  22. Heavy Fluid's Avatar
    Roe - very nice. Major ownage right there. MAJOR!!!!
    03-16-09 05:32 PM
  23. Blahzee's Avatar
    i hate uncreative tattoos.
    03-16-09 05:39 PM
  24. Username0223's Avatar
    i just dont understand why people get like stars or butterflies, flowers, fairys, skulls,unicorns and other dumb things. do they do it just to have a picture on them or they like them for some strange reason. i think if u want a tattoo it should have a personal meaning to it. thats just me a lot of people are corny.

    i post on here most of the time because i dont have a use for the other topics yet. my phone seems to be working fine so far. come to think of it im getting a little bored with my bb so maybe i'll see what the other topics have.
    : *
    ~dont YOU have a skull tat'd to your face....????
    03-16-09 05:45 PM
  25. Blahzee's Avatar
    HAHhaa thats funny u believed that was me, but i saw that somewhere a while ago. idk why anyone would get that, i guess it looks cool but why?
    03-16-09 05:49 PM
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