1. phoreoneone's Avatar
    Everyone remembers how crazy things got when the US introduced the SOPA/PIPA bill. A lot of companies were furious that this bill was introduced and the negative feedback was so great that the government has temporarily suspended the bill.

    Now the Canadian Government is introducing The Protecting Children from Internet Predators Act. The proposed law gives police departments the ability to obtain personal information about Canadian Internet users without a warrant. That information includes names, addresses, phone numbers, TELEPHONE ACTIVITY and Internet Protocol Addresses, among other things.

    Source
    Move over, SOPA and say your prayers, PIPA. Theres a new bill in the works that, if passed, will pull the plug on how the Internet is used in Canada.

    Lawmakers in the Great White North are debating a bill that will pulverize whats left of online privacy for Canucks.

    The Investigative Powers for the 21st Century Act (Bill C-51) is legislation that isnt new to Canadian Parliament, but after a series of additions and other changes, lawmakers there are expected to begin discussion on it this week. If passed, law enforcement there will be able to monitor all Internet and telephone activity from anyone, anywhere in the country, without having to obtain a warrant.

    According to the Calgary Herald out of the province of Alberta, a Conservative-majority government is likely to pass the bill.

    Opponents of Toews, however, say that the bill will do far more harm than good.

    "I know the criminal justice system is constantly looking for information about criminals, child pornographers etc, but at the same time it seems like an invasion of everyone's personal information," University student Jared Exner tells CTV. Hes used the Internet his whole life and is aware of legislation already in place to thwart such things as child pornography. If Bill C-51 is passed, however, anyone operating on the Web or on a mobile device in Canada will be subject to instantaneous, no-questions-asked surveillance.

    Towes insists that its an issue thats either black or white. Canadians, says the minister, "can either stand with us or with the child pornographers."

    In an earlier form, the bill died in Parliament along with a provision that allowed warrantless access for authorities. A campaign managed to help kill that addendum, but it is back once again. If passed, authorities will be able to view anything, anytime, and some fear that it was install Big Brother over all too broad of a medium.

    "It could include anything from email addresses to IP addresses and cellphone-identified numbers," University of Ottawa law professor Michael Geist tells the Winnipeg Free Press. "The ability to use that kind of information in a highly sensitive way without any real oversight is very real."

    Others fear that if Canadian officials have the power to monitor in real-time without warrants, the all-watching eye will seemingly cease civil liberties.

    "How can we trust them not to use private information to intimidate law abiding Canadians to protest a pipeline, or protest pension cut?" asks Francis Scarpaleggia, a Liberal MP for Lac-Saint-Loius. Like Exner, Scarpaleggia is opposed to the bill. New Democratic Party member and digital critic Charlie Angus also is against it, and warns Parliament that, if passed, it will turn each Canadians cell-phone into an electronic prisoners bracelet.

    "I say to Vic Toews, 'Stop hiding behind the boogey man. Stop using the boogey man to attack the basic rights of Canadian citizens, adds Angus. Is Vic Toews saying that every privacy commissioner in this country who has raised concerns about this government's attempt to erase the basic obligation to get a judicial warrant, is he saying that they're for child pornography?"

    Nearly 100,000 Canadians have so far signed a "stop online spying petition started by openmedia.ca, a net neutrality lobby group.
    If this is passed then RIM will have to allow the government access to its servers (sms, bbm, phone logs, data usage).

    Source
    The bill also compels Internet service providers such as Bell and Rogers to implement the technical tools required for the monitoring and storage of digital communication.
    02-15-12 02:48 AM
  2. Rootbrian's Avatar
    This is what nobody wants. NOBODY. I don't even want that. We will oppose and resist, protest it.
    Eli_B likes this.
    02-15-12 05:12 AM
  3. dentynefire's Avatar
    Well Harper needs to find reasons to build all the mega prisons the conservatives want to build. While I say lock them up and throw away the key, monitoring everyones communication 24-7 isn't the way to do it. If you could trust the government to be 100 percent transparent then I would feel better but since you can't trust them at all forget about it! Remember the Government is all ways right. You might win in court after a decade of fighting in the legal syatem and come out broke and bitter. Is that what we want. Hi I'm from the government and we're here to help. Yes very comforting
    02-15-12 08:08 AM
  4. omniusovermind's Avatar
    I've already thought of a solution (although extreme) to this garbage. Here's the quicky guide:

    1. buy a really cheap netbook, pay cash.
    2. only use it at public wifi hotspots that don't have any type of cameras nearby. alternate them, don't create a pattern.
    3. from one of those, create email accounts that don't require any traceable info, and use them to sign up to whatever public forums you require for step 4 below.
    4. From those safe locations, leak as much dirty crap you can get your hands on to youtube, wikileaks, etc etc. Heck, while you're at it, make stuff up! Accusations don't need to be true in order to cause damage. Your intended target, Big Brother, uses that tactic already. what's good for the goose... But use that sparingly. Overdoing propoganda will jade public opinion against you rather than support you.
    5. Go have a couple pints and preplan what your next step will be when they legislate a shut down public wifi.
    6. Buy a Guy Fox mask and some cool throwing knives and a cape. Develop a cool sophisticated British accent.
    Last edited by omniusovermind; 02-15-12 at 08:40 AM.
    02-15-12 08:37 AM
  5. phoreoneone's Avatar
    I've already thought of a solution (although extreme) to this garbage. Here's the quicky guide:

    1. buy a really cheap netbook, pay cash.
    2. only use it at public wifi hotspots that don't have any type of cameras nearby. alternate them, don't create a pattern.
    3. from one of those, create email accounts that don't require any traceable info, and use them to sign up to whatever public forums you require for step 4 below.
    4. From those safe locations, leak as much dirty crap you can get your hands on to youtube, wikileaks, etc etc. Heck, while you're at it, make stuff up! Accusations don't need to be true in order to cause damage. Your intended target, Big Brother, uses that tactic already. what's good for the goose... But use that sparingly. Overdoing propoganda will jade public opinion against you rather than support you.
    5. Go have a couple pints and preplan what your next step will be when they legislate a shut down public wifi.
    6. Buy a Guy Fox mask and some cool throwing knives and a cape. Develop a cool sophisticated British accent.


    lolz if you are then i will get started right away!
    Last edited by phoreoneone; 02-15-12 at 12:24 PM.
    02-15-12 12:16 PM
  6. Rootbrian's Avatar
    I sport two guy fawkes masks. It wouldn't be that hard to start an accent and walk around the city for a day doing normal things. I'm used to protesting against that cult, so this'll be fun. Occupy would be awesome to get into this. I could see them making a point with a HUGE protest.
    02-15-12 04:43 PM
  7. hootyhoo's Avatar
    Let me see your papers comrade.

    Papers please, papers.
    02-15-12 06:33 PM
  8. blue81to's Avatar
    Yeah, if there's civil unrest they're going to use stuff like that to suppress decent. Its like that movie 1984. I've never seen it but my brother told me about it.

    I guess the biggest thing is allowing people from the executive branches(police & stuff) to monitor people with out warrants from the judicial branch(judges & stuff). That's a big difference because bias of the executive branch isn't being checked by the objectivity of judicial branch.

    With the introduction off E911, authorities can now listen to your microphone even when the phone is off. But they need a warrant first.
    YouTube - Fox news FBI can listen on cell phone

    Syria blocks text messages of terrorist. Everyone who criticize the government is a terrorist.
    Syria Disrupts Text Messaging of Protesters With Made-in-Dublin Equipment- Bloomberg
    02-16-12 03:24 AM
  9. Rootbrian's Avatar
    Calling the people terrorists is like calling an unbaptised baby a mass-murderer (that isn't possible, but that's for another non-religious thread on another site). This has to stop. Stupid government. I am against the government so they can assume I'm a terrorist who uses FREEDOM OF SPEECH in everything I say.
    02-16-12 03:30 AM
  10. blue81to's Avatar
    In my opinion, technology isn't the issue. The issue is maintaining checks and balances. A lot of the new laws addressing terrorism, immigration, copy right infringement, etc, are limiting the role of the judicial branch. Its about objectivity. Its not a judges job to prosecute, their job is to follow the law. These new laws are putting wolfs in charge of the hen house.

    Cell phones are being used to track our every move
    Big Brother malls trigger privacy row after installing equipment to spy on shoppers via their mobiles | Mail Online
    02-16-12 01:57 PM
  11. SCrid2000's Avatar
    All SOPA does at this point is require ad and payment companies to not send money to infringing sites. I personally support SOPA in its current form.

    I don't know what this Canadian law says (and don't care ) but if it actually is what the OP says it is (which I very much doubt, based on how much misinformation was spread about SOPA), then it's a bad idea.

    Here's a more positive article: Supreme Court Rules Warrant Needed for GPS Tracking | Mother Jones
    02-16-12 04:02 PM
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