1. middbrew's Avatar
    Hmm, I thought everone know about eating blackeyed peas giving you luck for year.
    Evidently everyone but me..................
    Well, it's because you aren't everone.
    kbz1960, jafobabe, louzer and 1 others like this.
    01-01-13 03:34 PM
  2. middbrew's Avatar
    You're right. All I have to fear here is MOM

    You know, the more is see that picture the more disturbing I think it is.
    01-01-13 03:37 PM
  3. pantlesspenguin's Avatar
    I'm in my apartment fitness center watching Twilight Zone and pretending to work out.
    01-01-13 03:41 PM
  4. kbz1960's Avatar
    You know, the more is see that picture the more disturbing I think it is.
    I agree lol
    01-01-13 03:42 PM
  5. middbrew's Avatar
    I'm in my apartment fitness center watching Twilight Zone and pretending to work out.
    I like the pretending to work out.
    01-01-13 03:46 PM
  6. middbrew's Avatar
    I really need to tend to my worms.
    kbz1960, jafobabe, louzer and 1 others like this.
    01-01-13 03:49 PM
  7. jafobabe's Avatar
    Blackeyed peas? I musta missed what they have to do with a new year?
    New Year’s Day Tradition – Black-Eyed Peas and Greens

    Eating black-eyed peas on New Year’s has been considered good luck for at least 1,500 years. According to a portion of the Talmud written around 500 A.D., it was Jewish custom at the time to eat black-eyed peas in celebration of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. It’s possible that the tradition arrived in America with Sephardic Jews, who first arrived in Georgia in the 1730s. Common folklore tells that the tradition spread after the Civil War. The Northern Army considered the black-eyed peas to be suitable only for animals, so they didn’t carry away or destroy the crops.

    There are a variety of explanations for the symbolism of black-eyed peas. One is that eating these simple legumes demonstrates humility and a lack of vanity. The humble nature of the black-eyed pea is echoed by the old expression, “Eat poor on New Year's, and eat fat the rest of the year.” Another explanation is that dried beans loosely resemble coins. Yet another is that because dried beans greatly expand in volume, they symbolize expanding wealth.

    Clearly, a lot of people closely associate good luck with monetary gain. That’s where the greens come in (in case I need to spell it out, green is the color of U.S. currency). Any green will do, but the most common choices are collard, turnip, or mustard greens. Golden cornbread is often added to the Southern New Year’s meal, and a well-known phrase is, “Peas for pennies, greens for dollars, and cornbread for gold.” Pork is a staple of just about every Southern meal, so it’s usually cooked with the black-eyed peas. The pork seems to be there for flavor as opposed to symbolism, but some theorize that because pigs root forward when foraging, the pork represents positive motion.
    01-01-13 03:50 PM
  8. kbz1960's Avatar
    New Year’s Day Tradition – Black-Eyed Peas and Greens

    Eating black-eyed peas on New Year’s has been considered good luck for at least 1,500 years. According to a portion of the Talmud written around 500 A.D., it was Jewish custom at the time to eat black-eyed peas in celebration of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. It’s possible that the tradition arrived in America with Sephardic Jews, who first arrived in Georgia in the 1730s. Common folklore tells that the tradition spread after the Civil War. The Northern Army considered the black-eyed peas to be suitable only for animals, so they didn’t carry away or destroy the crops.

    There are a variety of explanations for the symbolism of black-eyed peas. One is that eating these simple legumes demonstrates humility and a lack of vanity. The humble nature of the black-eyed pea is echoed by the old expression, “Eat poor on New Year's, and eat fat the rest of the year.” Another explanation is that dried beans loosely resemble coins. Yet another is that because dried beans greatly expand in volume, they symbolize expanding wealth.

    Clearly, a lot of people closely associate good luck with monetary gain. That’s where the greens come in (in case I need to spell it out, green is the color of U.S. currency). Any green will do, but the most common choices are collard, turnip, or mustard greens. Golden cornbread is often added to the Southern New Year’s meal, and a well-known phrase is, “Peas for pennies, greens for dollars, and cornbread for gold.” Pork is a staple of just about every Southern meal, so it’s usually cooked with the black-eyed peas. The pork seems to be there for flavor as opposed to symbolism, but some theorize that because pigs root forward when foraging, the pork represents positive motion.
    Well damn. I need to get some black eyed peas
    01-01-13 03:54 PM
  9. middbrew's Avatar
    New Year’s Day Tradition – Black-Eyed Peas and Greens

    Eating black-eyed peas on New Year’s has been considered good luck for at least 1,500 years. According to a portion of the Talmud written around 500 A.D., it was Jewish custom at the time to eat black-eyed peas in celebration of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year. It’s possible that the tradition arrived in America with Sephardic Jews, who first arrived in Georgia in the 1730s. Common folklore tells that the tradition spread after the Civil War. The Northern Army considered the black-eyed peas to be suitable only for animals, so they didn’t carry away or destroy the crops.

    There are a variety of explanations for the symbolism of black-eyed peas. One is that eating these simple legumes demonstrates humility and a lack of vanity. The humble nature of the black-eyed pea is echoed by the old expression, “Eat poor on New Year's, and eat fat the rest of the year.” Another explanation is that dried beans loosely resemble coins. Yet another is that because dried beans greatly expand in volume, they symbolize expanding wealth.

    Clearly, a lot of people closely associate good luck with monetary gain. That’s where the greens come in (in case I need to spell it out, green is the color of U.S. currency). Any green will do, but the most common choices are collard, turnip, or mustard greens. Golden cornbread is often added to the Southern New Year’s meal, and a well-known phrase is, “Peas for pennies, greens for dollars, and cornbread for gold.” Pork is a staple of just about every Southern meal, so it’s usually cooked with the black-eyed peas. The pork seems to be there for flavor as opposed to symbolism, but some theorize that because pigs root forward when foraging, the pork represents positive motion.
    Very interesting. Thanks for sharing.
    01-01-13 03:57 PM
  10. middbrew's Avatar
    01-01-13 03:58 PM
  11. middbrew's Avatar
    01-01-13 03:58 PM
  12. pantlesspenguin's Avatar
    We should design our own fraternity paddle.
    01-01-13 03:58 PM
  13. middbrew's Avatar
    01-01-13 03:59 PM
  14. middbrew's Avatar
    We should design our own fraternity paddle.
    I like your thinking there.
    01-01-13 03:59 PM
  15. middbrew's Avatar
    01-01-13 04:00 PM
  16. jafobabe's Avatar
    But just have to have this on New Year's Day fersure!!

    The CB 1M post Challenge!-lucky-charms-cereal-box.jpg
    01-01-13 04:02 PM
  17. BergerKing's Avatar
    Not sure where you are, but tonight it will get down to around 30F but will be dry... no rain.

    My daughter is driving truck and is in Joplan, MO and she is freezing! They will be going to Harriman, Tenn. to a new terminal.
    Pffft, 30 degrees, that's nuttin'. I can still be in shorts and a T sat 30.
    01-01-13 04:04 PM
  18. louzer's Avatar
    I'm heating up some Lazagna (Stouffer's) and going to have garlic toast with it..... In about 10 minutes or so.
    I love Stouffer's lasagna.
    01-01-13 04:06 PM
  19. louzer's Avatar
    Wonder how many more unfavorable likenesses I will have to endure on my voyage?? http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/s...milies-030.gif
    Depends on inspiration.
    01-01-13 04:07 PM
  20. BergerKing's Avatar
    Not sure where you are, but tonight it will get down to around 30F but will be dry... no rain.

    My daughter is driving truck and is in Joplan, MO and she is freezing! They will be going to Harriman, Tenn. to a new terminal.
    Passed by Joplin about 3 hours ago, rolling down 69 in Oklahoma. I'll cut thru my native Big D, then on down to New Braunfels.
    01-01-13 04:07 PM
  21. louzer's Avatar
    Bon voyageeeeeee!!!! ERMAHGERD!!!!!!
    I'm much happier about this avatar since it's been sized not to crop out 1/3 of the image.
    01-01-13 04:08 PM
  22. louzer's Avatar
    BEEN one HE11 of a ride so far
    It's not over yet!
    01-01-13 04:09 PM
  23. louzer's Avatar
    Need I say more????
    Of course. We've got a ways to go!
    01-01-13 04:09 PM
  24. louzer's Avatar
    POOF.... Everybody gone!!!!
    Poof ... They're back!!!!
    01-01-13 04:13 PM
  25. louzer's Avatar
    Now "THEY" told me I hadda wait 8 seconds before I could post......

    10 char
    Patience is a virtue, but the 30 second timer is a PITA!
    01-01-13 04:14 PM
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