07-23-13 10:20 PM
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  1. DivideBYZero's Avatar
    To be fair the guy that started this seemed pretty upset


    Posted via CB10
    Nope.

    Posted via CB10
    07-13-13 08:22 PM
  2. johnnyuk's Avatar
    I spotted another that always makes me chuckle, "circumnavigate" instead of "circumvent".

    Oh, you went sailing around the problem did you? I didn't know you had a boat.

    Posted via CB10
    shaleem likes this.
    07-16-13 03:12 AM
  3. Fret Madden's Avatar
    I spotted another that always makes me chuckle, "circumnavigate" instead of "circumvent".

    Oh, you went sailing around the problem did you? I didn't know you had a boat.

    Posted via CB10
    Hope they don't wonder off the beaten path.

    Posted via CB10
    07-16-13 04:38 AM
  4. anon(4275744)'s Avatar
    My personal favourite: "I could care less"...

    Posted via CB10
    Or.... irregardless!!
    Please.... it's regardless!

    From Zed to U via CB10
    07-19-13 04:05 PM
  5. shaleem's Avatar
    Very interesting observations, thank you for commenting. I do find both the similarities and differences between common languages and languages around the world in general an interesting topic, I must get out more! Lol

    It gives me hope when you say that Canadian English has more in common with UK English than US English that all is not lost to the American steam roller as far as our common shared language is concerned .

    One thing that made me glad that BlackBerry is Canadian is it meant that at the launch of the Z10 the US and the rest of the world got to hear the letter Z pronounced correctly as Zed and not Zee, for some perhaps for the first time in their lives!

    I jest of course, pronunciation of English words and even letters is bound to differ over the globe, it's inevitable. Pronouncing letters differently happens even closer to home than most people in England would think. I was holidaying in the South West of Scotland recently, which is only around 150 miles from where I am in the far north of England and was surprised to find local people pronouncing the letter J as J'eye rather than J'ay. It's probably a very local slang and social standing/circle related thing as J in the alphabet is taught in schools in Scotland as J'ay but interesting all the same.

    Ooh I just realised I said "holidaying", would a Canadian use the US "vacationing" instead? I've come across many US Americans who can't get their heads around the idea of there being "holidays" other than at Christmas. We have Easter Holidays, Public Holidays, schools have Summer Holidays, if you take time off work at any time of the year and go away somewhere you can be said to have gone on holiday. You can be said to have done that if you go away somewhere even if you don't have a job to take time off from. Ooh "from"...theres one I missed...

    "Off of" vs "Off" and "From" - There are many people in the UK who in everyday speech do fall in to the trap of saying "off of" where they should either just say "off" or say "from". For example, "The wheel fell off of the wagon" which should just be "The wheel fell off the wagon" or alternatively "The wheel fell from the wagon". That doesn't always follow though as people here also often use "off of" when talking about where a famous person is known from for example "Joe Blogs off of <insert your favourite TV show here>" when only "Joe Blogs from..." should really be used, not "Joe Blogs off..."

    I've come across "off of" often in US media too with the major difference being that in the US I've seen it used in written published and supposedly edited articles as well as heard it in TV broadcasts of news and factual programs. While it is a "figure of speech" in the UK and never used formally it seems to have become everyday written English in US. I've noticed figures of speech creep in to the formal writing styles of many US publications over the years which can alienate the reader as a figure of speech can be a very localised thing, certainly not understood or could easily be misinterpreted by someone not from that region or country. Perhaps it's the inward looking nature of the US relaxing formal writing styles and making the writer forget who the reader might be.

    Posted via CB10
    Ah, yes. I have always said that the British and Americans were two peoples separated by a common language.



    Posted with my Z10 via CB10
    anon(4275744) likes this.
    07-19-13 04:17 PM
  6. john_v's Avatar
    I saw this today and immediately thought of this thread.

    Sent from my Note 2 using Mobile Nations mobile app
    Attached Thumbnails &quot;BlackBerry Z10 is better then X&quot; or &quot;I want to e-punch anyone who uses THEN in place of THAN&quot;-1374366468515.jpg  
    ilikebacon and johnnyuk like this.
    07-20-13 07:27 PM
  7. anon6040766's Avatar
    If the rule is "i" before "e" except after "c" then isn't SCIENCE spelled incorrectly?

    Verizon BlackBerry Q10
    07-20-13 11:18 PM
  8. ilikebacon's Avatar
    If the rule is "i" before "e" except after "c" then isn't SCIENCE spelled incorrectly?

    Verizon BlackBerry Q10
    Not cool to try and make me think that hard this early in the morning.

    Posted via CB10
    07-21-13 04:01 AM
  9. johnnyuk's Avatar
    If the rule is "i" before "e" except after "c" then isn't SCIENCE spelled incorrectly?

    Verizon BlackBerry Q10
    That rule has so many exceptions that a few years ago the Government in the UK advised teachers that it wasn't even worth teaching it! I don't think any teachers listened to them, but I can see the Government's point.

    Posted via CB10
    07-22-13 07:39 PM
  10. john_v's Avatar
    If the rule is "i" before "e" except after "c" then isn't SCIENCE spelled incorrectly?

    Verizon BlackBerry Q10
    I'll just leave this here

    &quot;BlackBerry Z10 is better then X&quot; or &quot;I want to e-punch anyone who uses THEN in place of THAN&quot;-images.jpg
    07-22-13 07:46 PM
  11. amazinglygraceless's Avatar
    One of my biggest grammatical pet peeves is not so much a word but a phrase that is used incorrectly all the time. Begs the question is not the same as asking or raising a question.

    Begging the question is stating a premise and then attempting to prove the premise by restating it with a word(s) that essentially mean the same thing.

    Examples:

    Correct: She is unattractive because she has crooked teeth, a mono-brow and severe acne.
    The original premise is that she is unattractive and that premise is supported by three things that the the person thinks makes her unattractive.

    Begging the question: He is unattractive because he is ugly.
    The question of why he is unattractive is left "begging" an answer because the only support for the original notion is a word that is synonymous.
    07-23-13 09:21 PM
  12. Fret Madden's Avatar
    One of my biggest grammatical pet peeves is not so much a word but a phrase that is used incorrectly all the time. Begs the question is not the same as asking or raising a question.

    Begging the question is stating a premise and then attempting to prove the premise by restating it with a word(s) that essentially mean the same thing.

    Examples:

    Correct: She is unattractive because she has crooked teeth, a mono-brow and severe acne.
    The original premise is that she is unattractive and that premise is supported by three things that the the person thinks makes her unattractive.

    Begging the question: He is unattractive because he is ugly.
    The question of why he is unattractive is left "begging" an answer because the only support for the original notion is a word that is synonymous.
    Now that I didn't know. I had assumed till now that it literally meant there was a question to be asked following a statement or series of statements. This is formulated on observed usage scenarios over the years.

    Posted via CB10
    07-23-13 10:20 PM
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