07-14-12 09:40 AM
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  1. Bigruss8's Avatar
    Read the initial post by the OP.

    For reference from Merriam Webster.

    disparage
    1: to lower in rank or reputation : degrade
    2: to depreciate by indirect means (as invidious comparison) : speak slightingly about

    IMO good selling is focusing on a given prouct's strong points as a reason to buy it and not on what you think are another products negative ones, especially when you don't have your facts straight. But that's just my view of things.
    Well then we can agree to disagree because in my opinion good selling is the opposite of what you wrote. I like BB, but if it were my job, I'd be compelled to point out it's short comings which are numerous when compared to the current iOS and Android devices, so I guess I would be accused of "disparaging" BBs. I'd do the same with the iphone and Android and WinPhones and of course I would have my personal recommendation which is also part of a good salesmanship. It's the clerk's opinion and just that and he/she is told by Best Buy to give it.

    Question: If we were talking about any other product that you don't have a strong affinity for and you asked a clerk for his opinion and he refused to give it or refused to point the negatives of a product and you found out later it was known to him/her what would your opinion be then?
    07-07-12 08:26 AM
  2. jonno_atamaniuk's Avatar
    Well then we can agree to disagree because in my opinion good selling is the opposite of what you wrote. I like BB, but if it were my job, I'd be compelled to point out it's short comings which are numerous when compared to the current iOS and Android devices, so I guess I would be accused of "disparaging" BBs. I'd do the same with the iphone and Android and WinPhones and of course I would have my personal recommendation which is also part of a good salesmanship. It's the clerk's opinion and just that and he/she is told by Best Buy to give it.

    Question: If we were talking about any other product that you don't have a strong affinity for and you asked a clerk for his opinion and he refused to give it or refused to point the negatives of a product and you found out later it was known to him/her what would your opinion be then?
    You'd be right if the sales clerk's opinion was asked, or if the OP had gone into the store and said "I noticed you have the BlackBerry Bold 9900 on sale, I'd like some more information about this phone. What can you tell me?" From my understanding, that was not the case. Instead the OP went into the store and said "I'd like to buy this phone," and instead of being answered with "Great! Let's get the process started!" or "I'm really sorry, we're out of stock of that from the amazing sale on that phone, but may I offer other suggestions that you could be just as happy with?", they were instead answered with "Why would you want that? These other products are superior in every way! Here, let me go on to explain."

    Now you are correct in that Best Buy may encourage their reps to give their personal recommendation, such as whichever phone they personally use, however that becomes a moot point whenever a client specifically requests a device. The sales rep could have also said "If I might ask, what are you wanting the BlackBerry to do to benefit you?", and that would have allowed the representative to either very politely suggest other devices that could better serve the OP, or simply nod, acknowledge that the OP as a customer knows what they want, and get them their phone.

    You say you'd be compelled to point out a platform's shortcomings, and do so with every platform, and that much is fine, however there is a way of doing it that would not degrade the product in the eyes of the client. Taking the OP's example of e-mail, for example, the rep simply said that e-mail was inferior on the BlackBerry in comparison to anything else (which, from personal experience, it's not, it's actually quite superior from my experiences). An experienced and knowledgeable sales representative would have explained the differences in e-mail handling on the two different devices. For example, "Now while BlackBerry is a great messaging platform, you may notice from time to time you get a message stating that an e-mail has been truncated due to it's size. It does this to help keep your data plan under control, avoiding sending oversized messages directly to your phone, but it can be an annoyance. How often do you receive incredibly large e-mails?" This is part of uncovering the needs of the client, and if the OP was being asked these sort of questions, it'd be a much more polite and considerate way for the sales clerk to start to suggest other devices without disparaging the BlackBerry Brand. Just the same I wouldn't talk to someone who came into my store asking for an Android phone and say "Well, you don't want an Android phone because there is a severe lack of security in their devices. You leave yourself open to malicious software even straight from the Google Play store. You really want an iPhone or BlackBerry." As true as that is, there are better ways to put it, but it would be better for me to simply find out the experience level of the client and as necessary let them know to be careful what they download from the Google Play store and to always read the list of authorization requests before hitting the download button.

    To answer your question, if a sales rep IS ASKED for their opinion, more information, or for a comparison of the products, and they do not provide any of the negative points (or do so in a very condescending manner), then they are a bad sales person. This will become known as more and more returns get filed under their employee number, and either their manager (at either store or regional level) will correct them and get them into shape or they will be let go. It's as simple as that. If, however, their opinion is not asked, and they've asked questions to make sure they are getting you the device that you want, then is there any point to your question? From the story of the OP, it sounds like they did not ask for the opinion of the sales representative, and the sales representative did not ask to make sure the benefits of the Blackberry would fit the needs of the OP, but instead merely interjected to say that something else would automatically be better suited to them when that may not necessarily be the case.

    If the benefits of the device fit the needs of the client as is, the negative may not matter quite so much as you seem to think it will. I know many iPhone users who love their iPhone despite the crippling battery life. I know many Android users who are well aware the security risks and just remain informed enough to not get caught up in the security problems. I know many Blackberry users who love their BlackBerry phones regardless the shortcomings and will continue to buy BlackBerry because it works for them and fits their needs better than an iOS device or Android device does. That's just how the world is.
    07-07-12 01:28 PM
  3. jgrobertson's Avatar
    You'd be right if the sales clerk's opinion was asked,
    or if the OP had gone into the store and said "I noticed you have the BlackBerry Bold 9900 on sale, I'd like some more information about this phone. What can you tell me?" From my understanding, that was not the case. Instead the OP went into the store and said "I'd like to buy this phone," and instead of being answered with "Great! Let's get the process started!" or "I'm really sorry, we're out of stock of that from the amazing sale on that phone, but may I offer other suggestions that you could be just as happy with?", they were instead answered with "Why would you want that? These other products are superior in every way! Here, let me go on to explain."

    Now you are correct in that Best Buy may encourage their reps to give their personal recommendation, such as whichever phone they personally use, however that becomes a moot point whenever a client specifically requests a device. The sales rep could have also said "If I might ask, what are you wanting the BlackBerry to do to beneufit you?", and that would have allowed the representative to either very politely suggest other devices that could better serve the OP, or simply nod, acknowledge that the OP as a customer knows what they want, and get them their phone.

    You say you'd be compelled to point out a platform's shortcomings, and do so with every platform, and that much is fine, however there is a way of doing it that would not degrade the product in the eyes of the client. Taking the OP's example of e-mail, for example, the rep simply said that e-mail was inferior on the BlackBerry in comparison to anything else (which, from personal experience, it's not, it's actually quite superior from my experiences). An experienced and knowledgeable sales representative would have explained the differences in e-mail handling on the two different devices. For example, "Now while BlackBerry is a great messaging platform, you may notice from time to time you get a message stating that an e-mail has been truncated due to it's size. It does this to help keep your data plan under control, avoiding sending oversized messages directly to your phone, but it can be an annoyance. How often do you receive incredibly large e-mails?" This is part of uncovering the needs of the client, and if the OP was being asked these sort of questions, it'd be a much more polite and considerate way for the sales clerk to start to suggest other devices without disparaging the BlackBerry Brand. Just the same I wouldn't talk to someone who came into my store asking for an Android phone and say "Well, you don't want an Android phone because there is a severe lack of security in their devices. You leave yourself open to malicious software even straight from the Google Play store. You really want an iPhone or BlackBerry." As true as that is, there are better ways to put it, but it would be better for me to simply find out the experience level of the client and as necessary let them know to be careful what they download from the Google Play store and to always read the list of authorization requests before hitting the download button.

    To answer your question, if a sales rep IS ASKED for their opinion, more information, or for a comparison of the products, and they do not provide any of the negative points (or do so in a very condescending manner), then they are a bad sales person. This will become known as more and more returns get filed under their employee number, and either their manager (at either store or regional level) will correct them and get them into shape or they will be let go. It's as simple as that. If, however, their opinion is not asked, and they've asked questions to make sure they are getting you the device that you want, then is there any point to your question? From the story of the OP, it sounds like they did not ask for the opinion of the sales representative, and the sales representative did not ask to make sure the benefits of the Blackberry would fit the needs of the OP, but instead merely interjected to say that something else would automatically be better suited to them when that may not necessarily be the case.

    If the benefits of the device fit the needs of the client as is, the negative may not matter quite so much as you seem to think it will. I know many iPhone users who love their iPhone despite the crippling battery life. I know many Android users who are well aware the security risks and just remain informed enough to not get caught up in the security problems. I know many Blackberry users who love their BlackBerry phones regardless the shortcomings and will continue to buy BlackBerry because it works for them and fits their needs better than an iOS device or Android device does. That's just how the world is.
    It am the OP. I walked up to the display and said NOTHING. The sales person saw me looking at the 9900 and then said we don't recommend BlackBerry. He was aggressively not sell BB. He did not recommend another brand either - I did not give him a chance.
    07-14-12 09:40 AM
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