01-20-11 08:19 AM
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  1. firsttimeberryuser's Avatar
    Cell phone use SHOULD be banned while driving. I havent read many of your posts but the very first reply to this thread stated the fact that there is the reckless operation law. Granted this will get you for causing an accident while using the phone but why not make it so you cant use the phone while driving and avoid teh accident in the first place. I see too many idiots who cant drive and talk at the same time. These are the same idiots i wish would slam head first into a tree while im around so i can go, "See?". The majority of the population cant drive anyway, why make it possible for them to drive even worse?

    With todays technologies i think that they should implement a way to shut off cell phone activity once you reach a certain speed via gps. You hit 10mph and your cell phone is unable to send or recieve calls/messages. GPS systems can already tellyou how fast you are going, why not use them to keep people safe.

    How many of you have ben on the phone, hands free or not, and driven from point a to point b, and not remembered a bit of the drive there? This is the point they are looking at, not that you are holding a phone to your ear, but the fact that you have to concentrate on the phone call to listen and speak which causes you to not pay attention to the road.
    Last edited by firsttimeberryuser; 01-12-09 at 09:21 AM.
    01-12-09 09:16 AM
  2. mykey2k's Avatar
    Looks like it's time to invest the $17 in the "World's Smallest Bluetooth" headset that was 'featured' in an episode of The Office. Find it at Deal Extreme.

    Be legal before you're an outlaw! Get accostomed to it, before you need to rely on it!


    -m
    01-12-09 09:19 AM
  3. SevereDeceit's Avatar
    What has the world come to, ya know?
    01-12-09 09:25 AM
  4. Tlynnsmith's Avatar
    Cell phone use SHOULD be banned while driving. I havent read many of your posts but the very first reply to this thread stated the fact that there is the reckless operation law. Granted this will get you for causing an accident while using the phone but why not make it so you cant use the phone while driving and avoid teh accident in the first place. I see too many idiots who cant drive and talk at the same time. These are the same idiots i wish would slam head first into a tree while im around so i can go, "See?". The majority of the population cant drive anyway, why make it possible for them to drive even worse?

    With todays technologies i think that they should implement a way to shut off cell phone activity once you reach a certain speed via gps. You hit 10mph and your cell phone is unable to send or recieve calls/messages. GPS systems can already tellyou how fast you are going, why not use them to keep people safe.

    How many of you have ben on the phone, hands free or not, and driven from point a to point b, and not remembered a bit of the drive there? This is the point they are looking at, not that you are holding a phone to your ear, but the fact that you have to concentrate on the phone call to listen and speak which causes you to not pay attention to the road.

    That's the truth. Don't drive all on top of someone, because if they have to stop suddenly, you might end up in their front seat. Use your turn signal, when changing lanes and...making turns. Don't speed up, when you see someone trying to get over from the entrance ramp. "Black ice" is not an urban legend, so slow down and don't be in a hurry to die.

    Those are some of the driving basics, that folks have a hard time observing, without the added distraction of trying to talk/text.

    Also, when traffic is heavy and the weather is bad, my dad will NOT even use a headset. It comes off his ear, and he concentrates on getting to his destination. It's not that serious. He taught me to drive and one of the first things he said at my first lesson was, "Driving is all about watching what's going on around you, and being ready to respond properly within seconds. Steering the car is as easy as it gets".
    01-12-09 09:37 AM
  5. Curve63049's Avatar
    I'm all for the idea. Talking on a cell phone and trying to drive is not good. I almost got hit by cars, twice, by folks too busy talking on the phone to pay attention to the most important activity driving. I've seen near-accidents several times.

    Talkin-on-the-phone-while-driving conversations should be limited to the, "I'm stopping to pick up milk. Bye" variety. Long, involved convos should not be, unless you pull over. Better yet, wait till you're out of the car. Unless it's something very important, a conversation can wait until both parties are off the road.

    I know, we all are such good drivers that we don't need to concentrate on the road and people in front, back and at the side of us. That's foolishness. I just saw a woman a few days ago, putting on eye makeup while driving. Or, you got the folks who are diggin' in the back seat, looking for whatever, while driving. They've done it numerous times, so they think they're masters. One day it's going to have a different outcome.

    Plus, even if we had laws banning cell phone usage while driving, people would still try to talk and drive and not get caught.
    Not flaming, just trying to understand. I'm a bit confusedn the one hand "you're all for the idea." The "idea" being to make it illegal to talk (hands free or not) on a cell phone while driving.

    On the other hand, you think "talking-on-the-phone-while-driving" should be limited to certain types of conversation and seem to believe that any law would be broken (frequently) anyway.

    I gather you're *against* (most) cell phone use while driving, but don't necessarily support a *law* making it a criminal offense (even just a misdemeanor)?
    01-12-09 09:38 AM
  6. rachel0179's Avatar
    Too many people today have a sense of entitlement. Because we have a cell, are we entitled to use it where ever we want, regarldess of our saftey and other people saftey - yeh I dont think so.

    I dont think they should ban ALL usage, but there are some idiots out there with that sense of entitlement which infuriates me.
    01-12-09 09:42 AM
  7. kbell's Avatar
    If people were more careful & aware then we wouldn't need the law to step in but the fact is they aren't careful. I've seen lots of folks in front of me txting & weaving left & right going 75 on the highway. I also see them just talking away while drifting into other lanes, not moving when they should, obliviously cutting people off, almost hitting things and people in the city, I've seen so many close calls and witnessed the driver was holding their phone.

    While many people use the phone & still drive well, it's the careless, thoughtless people who are putting everyone at risk. If a law stops/deters them I am all for it regardless if it "inconveniences" others.

    If the supposed "good" drivers who talk while driving don't want an all out ban then how about really enforcing the laws we already have? "driving to endanger" and "reckless driving" offenses being applicable to those doing just that while they drive using their handheld device. If they would just enforce the laws already on the books I think we shouldn't need the ban. Police witnessing horrendous driving should be pulling them over & charging them period. I'd think that charge would carry more weight than some ticket. In my state it's a major moving violation.
    01-12-09 09:43 AM
  8. Curve63049's Avatar
    With todays technologies i think that they should implement a way to shut off cell phone activity once you reach a certain speed via gps. You hit 10mph and your cell phone is unable to send or recieve calls/messages. GPS systems can already tellyou how fast you are going, why not use them to keep people safe.
    I think this is impractical: using GPS how do you distinguish between being the *driver* and being a *passenger*?

    Over the summer - when gas prices were $4 per gallon - or family used "Megabus" to travel from St. Louis to Chicago - about a 5 hr trip. (it was cheaper and not much more longer than flying with airport hassles and such). I was glad to have BOTH my data card and my cell phone on that trip.

    How many of you have ben on the phone, hands free or not, and driven from point a to point b, and not remembered a bit of the drive there? This is the point they are looking at, not that you are holding a phone to your ear, but the fact that you have to concentrate on the phone call to listen and speak which causes you to not pay attention to the road.
    But that's true of many things - heck I've left work *thinking* about a problem and done the same thing.
    01-12-09 09:43 AM
  9. Tlynnsmith's Avatar
    Not flaming, just trying to understand. I'm a bit confusedn the one hand "you're all for the idea." The "idea" being to make it illegal to talk (hands free or not) on a cell phone while driving.

    On the other hand, you think "talking-on-the-phone-while-driving" should be limited to certain types of conversation and seem to believe that any law would be broken (frequently) anyway.
    I gather you're *against* (most) cell phone use while driving, but don't necessarily support a *law* making it a criminal offense (even just a misdemeanor)?

    I am all for the idea. IF you HAVE to talk on a cell phone while driving, then keep your convos short and to the point. I don't have to talk on a cell phone while driving, and I don't. Those who would need to reach me for an emergency know how to "page" me with a certain code. If I get that type of call, I'll pull over and take it.

    But I realize that most folks think they can totally concentrate on the road, and drive, and text, and put on makeup, etc. I also stated that most folks will break the law, if there were such a law, because it would be hard to enforce.
    01-12-09 09:44 AM
  10. Curve63049's Avatar
    Too many people today have a sense of entitlement. Because we have a cell, are we entitled to use it where ever we want, regarldess of our saftey and other people saftey - yeh I dont think so.
    The flip-side to that, though, are the people who think there should be a criminal law for every violation of a "good practice."

    Should you use your seatbelt? Yes. Should you be fined and subjected to being stopped by a police officer for not
    wearing your belt? I'm not convinced (though most states have such laws).
    01-12-09 09:49 AM
  11. Spinny's Avatar
    I think there's a disconnect between "criminal" and "civil" here. If you get nailed in NY for cell phone use while driving, it's a CIVIL offense, not a criminal one. You don't go to jail or get dragged before a judge unless you dispute the ticket. Just like speeding (short of reckless endangerment) you just incur a fine.
    01-12-09 09:51 AM
  12. rachel0179's Avatar
    The flip-side to that, though, are the people who think there should be a criminal law for every violation of a "good practice."

    Should you use your seatbelt? Yes. Should you be fined and subjected to being stopped by a police officer for not
    wearing your belt? I'm not convinced (though most states have such laws).


    I dont think you can compare the two however. You not wearing your seatbelt doesnt , or has little impact to me, however, you yammering on a cell phone in a deep conversation, or texting BFF letting her know what color purse you have, well, the chances are, yes, it might impact me, because I could be the one crossing the street, I could be the one who has the right of way, I could be the one you are travelling next too on a freeway and you veer over.
    01-12-09 09:53 AM
  13. Curve63049's Avatar
    I am all for the idea. IF you HAVE to talk on a cell phone while driving, then keep your convos short and to the point. I don't have to talk on a cell phone while driving, and I don't. Those who would need to reach me for an emergency know how to "page" me with a certain code. If I get that type of call, I'll pull over and take it.
    But, you can't really *make* that a law. What - legally speaking - would be a "short" conversation? Or one that is "to the point"? Even if you defined a short conversation as "no longer than x minutes" - it becomes impractical for police to enforce - how does an officer know when my conversation began/ended? And how does he distinguish between a cell phone call and my in-car singing (I'm a true American Idol star . . . in the confines of my car :-) )
    Last edited by Curve63049; 01-12-09 at 09:56 AM.
    01-12-09 09:53 AM
  14. Curve63049's Avatar
    I dont think you can compare the two however. You not wearing your seatbelt doesnt , or has little impact to me, however, you yammering on a cell phone in a deep conversation, or texting BFF letting her know what color purse you have, well, the chances are, yes, it might impact me, because I could be the one crossing the street, I could be the one who has the right of way, I could be the one you are travelling next too on a freeway and you veer over.
    Ok, let's outlaw radios and mp3 players in the automobile - if you want to change the channel . . . or the volume . . . do it before you engage "D" (or "R") on your gear shift.
    01-12-09 09:55 AM
  15. SevereDeceit's Avatar
    There will never be a right answer to this...
    01-12-09 09:58 AM
  16. rachel0179's Avatar
    LOL you're reaching now.

    We have different opinions and thats fine.
    01-12-09 09:58 AM
  17. AStranger's Avatar
    I think there's a disconnect between "criminal" and "civil" here. If you get nailed in NY for cell phone use while driving, it's a CIVIL offense, not a criminal one. You don't go to jail or get dragged before a judge unless you dispute the ticket. Just like speeding (short of reckless endangerment) you just incur a fine.
    I pretty much agree with this approach.

    The problem with cell phones and driving isn't hands free or not, it is the fact that you can get distracted from driving just like putting on make up or other things.

    If a person in an accident was on the phone or otherwise distracted then that should be a factor in deciding who is at fault for the accident.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    01-12-09 10:01 AM
  18. firsttimeberryuser's Avatar
    I think this is impractical: using GPS how do you distinguish between being the *driver* and being a *passenger*?
    Well that would just have to be a sacrifice you were willing to support in order to keep our highways safer. Got a long trip coming up? bring a PSP and a pillow.
    01-12-09 10:01 AM
  19. Curve63049's Avatar
    I'll also add this . . . I'd certainly like to know more about the methodology of these studies. For this reason:

    We certainly HAD automobile accidents before cell phones were invented. People followed too closely, failed to maintain their lanes, etc. We cannot attribute the *cause* of such accidents to cell phone use (because cell phones didn't exist).

    By the same token, just because a person was on a cell phone when they rear-ended you doesn't mean that the accident would not have occurred if they had not been on the phone.

    That is, attributing *causation* to use of a cell phone while driving is - IMO - pretty tricky.
    01-12-09 10:02 AM
  20. Tlynnsmith's Avatar
    But, you can't really *make* that a law. What - legally speaking - would be a "short" conversation? Or one that is "to the point"? Even if you defined a short conversation as "no longer than x minutes" - it becomes impractical for police to enforce - how does an officer know when my conversation began/ended? And how does he distinguish between a cell phone call and my in-car singing (I'm a true American Idol star . . . in the confines of my car :-) )

    I think you just like to debate issues, just for the heck of it, which is fine. I bit the bait, but it's the last time. Either ban all cell phone usage, or don't.

    I thought it was very clear that I was addressing folks, who feel they need to talk on the phone, when I said, "If you have to talk on the phone...". I was not saying that an intelligent law can be built around what is considered a short vs long convo. I may not be the sharpest pencil in the box, but I'm not the dullest, either.
    Last edited by Tlynnsmith; 01-12-09 at 10:05 AM.
    01-12-09 10:03 AM
  21. Spinny's Avatar
    I believe, in the end, this initiative will go the way of the one I mentioned they tried in my county: abandoned as not enforceable. With the myriad bluetooth devices available now, it's going to be trivially easy to wear one that can't bee seen from a patrol car. Mine isn't the smallest, but my hair completely hides it, just to name one example. Institutes are all about thought experiments and what they endorse as a good idea from a theoretical standpoint, but it takes legislators to enact laws and I can't imagine any among that crowd who'd see this as other than a waste of time they could be spending drafting pork.
    01-12-09 10:05 AM
  22. Curve63049's Avatar
    I think there's a disconnect between "criminal" and "civil" here. If you get nailed in NY for cell phone use while driving, it's a CIVIL offense, not a criminal one. You don't go to jail or get dragged before a judge unless you dispute the ticket. Just like speeding (short of reckless endangerment) you just incur a fine.
    Spinny: I'm not a NY law expert (just MO and Ill.), but if a ticket that's issued by a police officer, than it is - most definitely - a *criminal* offense. It may not be a felony offense (involving jail time), but just because it involves a monetary "sentence" (a fine) doesn't make it civil.
    01-12-09 10:06 AM
  23. Pete6's Avatar
    I think that a law to ban all cell phone usage would be unenforceable if it included hands free devices since it would be practically impossible to prove since the defendant could claim to have just been talking or singn and not on the phone at all.

    I personally support the bannng of holding a phone and talking as this is visible. Even so, it is the officer's word against the defendant's.

    There have been some tests done in the UK that "prove" that takling on the phone reduces concentration. They "proved" this by measuring reaction time. It was on TV so it must be true - right? Causing death by driving whilst on the phon eis now an imprisonable offense over there.

    Personally I have nearly wrecked my car several times whilst fiddling with my phone but not while talking. Generally I use a Jawbone bluetooth device.
    01-12-09 10:08 AM
  24. Pete6's Avatar
    Ok, that's the second dumbest statement by you!!

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    We thought so too and banned him.
    01-12-09 10:09 AM
  25. Spinny's Avatar
    WikiAnswers - What is the difference between civil and criminal law

    ETA: the indication is that I'm incorrect, by the way. Just being clear.
    Last edited by Spinny; 01-12-09 at 10:12 AM. Reason: amplification of meaning
    01-12-09 10:10 AM
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