1. pjfry's Avatar
    Facebook users are inadvertently providing access to their names and in some cases even their friend's names to advertising and Internet tracking companies, through some popular applications, the Wall Street Journal said.

    According to the Journal's investigation, the issue affects tens of millions of Facebook app users, including people who set their profiles to Facebook's strictest privacy settings, the paper said.

    The practice violates Facebook's rules and raises questions about its ability to keep identifiable information about its users' activities secure, the paper said.
    On Sunday, a Facebook spokesman told the Journal that it is taking steps to "dramatically limit" the exposure of users' personal information.
    "A Facebook user ID may be inadvertently shared by a user's Internet browser or by an application," the spokesman told the paper.
    Knowledge of an ID "does not permit access to anyone's private information on Facebook," he said, adding that the company would introduce new technology to contain the problem identified by the Journal.
    10-18-10 04:41 AM
  2. kellyjdrummer's Avatar
    Facebook users are inadvertently providing access to their names and in some cases even their friend's names to advertising and Internet tracking companies, through some popular applications, the Wall Street Journal said.

    According to the Journal's investigation, the issue affects tens of millions of Facebook app users, including people who set their profiles to Facebook's strictest privacy settings, the paper said.

    The practice violates Facebook's rules and raises questions about its ability to keep identifiable information about its users' activities secure, the paper said.
    On Sunday, a Facebook spokesman told the Journal that it is taking steps to "dramatically limit" the exposure of users' personal information.
    "A Facebook user ID may be inadvertently shared by a user's Internet browser or by an application," the spokesman told the paper.
    Knowledge of an ID "does not permit access to anyone's private information on Facebook," he said, adding that the company would introduce new technology to contain the problem identified by the Journal.
    I don't think so. They may be inadvertently not reading the provisions provided on the account creation page. I have a Facebook account and will post no private information publicly, but will if contacted by someone I actually know, as in family members, and people in my local physical area through E-Mail addresses, not through Facebook, and normally just call them on the phone. I don't "friend" people I do not know. Many do and there-in lies the problem.

    I will admit that breaches can not be foreseen, but I know they can be anticipated and measures can be taken by the provider and the user to prepare for or prevent such incursions.

    This whole privacy issue with Facebook and users has been pushed into Facebook's lap too many times. If you post to the world on the internet, the world will see it. Simple. "Farmville," "Mafia Wars," sending virtual gifts, etc., are open doors to this issue. You do not need to be a computer geek to figure this stuff out.

    Using the "strictest measures" rather than not posting sensitive information is the basis of the problem. Hiding something can not be substituted for not providing the information in the first place.

    I display my E-Mail address and my web page address on my Facebook page. I DO NOT hide anything else. I choose NOT to post any sensitive information and hide it. It just isn't there regardless of how deep you pry.

    Too bad for those who have been compromised, although it takes two to tango. You can not squarely place the blame on a network where you know you may be compromised by not using some restraint. I have seen reports in the news where people post to their page that they are "Going to Memphis for the week end to party hardy. Will be back for work on Monday," and come home to an empty house. The most recent I can remember was on CNN and happened to a woman in Indiana. The burglars were even caught on a camera in the house (with a blinking led showing, wow). The culprits were actually friends in her local neighborhood and were on her "friend" list of here Facebook page. She knew them and one of the idiots had been in grammar school with her.

    Very simply, if you don't want to show it, don't post it.
    Last edited by kellyjdrummer; 10-18-10 at 08:32 AM.
    10-18-10 08:18 AM
  3. Rootbrian's Avatar
    All my information is otherwise fake after the first week once I sign up on a website. Any info required, unless it's a purchase or e-mail account, is changed for fake or the neighbor's info is used, to prevent would-by thieves or data miners from getting to it. Not even an e-mail address is shown.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    10-22-10 10:51 AM
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