1. CASH's Avatar
    I'm honestly not surprised at all; I think about this everytime I see a text messaging, video game playing, iPod god-knows-whating etc obsessed kid. To be quite frank, I used to be one of them way back when (I'm 20). Very nice article.

    By staying relentlessly busy sending thousands of text messages a day, playing endless hours of video games, and checking Facebook every three minutes, kids are addressing two core needs. They're eliciting brief, tiny bits of gratification and reassurance, and avoiding loneliness and fear. "Video games don't make the hole," a student named Sean McMullen poignantly tells Richtel. "They fill it."

    The most obvious cost is that when they're preoccupied with technology for entertainment or escape, kids aren't engaged in learning or any sort of complex thinking.

    In one recent study, 47 percent of heavy users of technology were found to have poor grades, versus 23 percent of light users. The kids Richtel describes struggle at school nearly in direct proportion to the amount of time they spend online.

    47% Of Kids Who Are Heavy Technology Users Get Poor Grades
    11-24-10 08:07 PM
  2. SCrid2000's Avatar
    I suppose this article isn't saying technology influences the bad grades, but in case anyone assumes it is let me propose my hypothetical reason for the correlation:
    Those kids sending thousands of text messages are also the kids with active social lives. Social lives take precedence over school, and often lead to poorer grades. Further, highly intelligent kids are often more socially isolated, and thus unlikely to have anyone to sms/bbm.
    Lastly, kids who have all kinds of electronic goodies are more likely to have either permissive parents, or two working parents. This means less structure and supervision, meaning less work put into school, necessarily leading to poorer grades.
    11-25-10 03:41 PM
  3. mark_rivers19's Avatar
    i'm only asking that "they" construct readable and understandable sentences, with less OMG OMG OMG!
    11-25-10 03:47 PM
  4. Andiio's Avatar
    To me, this article implies that Technology is merely the vehicle by which 'kids' can express certain social needs, which before the boom in social networks, one can only presume they would of done by other methods anyway?

    On this basis, this article seems to be unfounded to me, but that's just my opinion.
    11-25-10 04:59 PM
  5. SCrid2000's Avatar
    My thoughts exactly.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-25-10 05:00 PM
  6. tennislvr8's Avatar
    Another theory is this. Technology does nothing to enhance thinking skills. Heaby tech users are not used to thinking and problem solving on their own. I am certain they are good literal thinkers but not inferential thinkers.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-25-10 05:01 PM
  7. SCrid2000's Avatar
    11-25-10 05:08 PM
  8. CASH's Avatar
    I suppose this article isn't saying technology influences the bad grades, but in case anyone assumes it is let me propose my hypothetical reason for the correlation:
    Those kids sending thousands of text messages are also the kids with active social lives. Social lives take precedence over school, and often lead to poorer grades. Further, highly intelligent kids are often more socially isolated, and thus unlikely to have anyone to sms/bbm.
    Lastly, kids who have all kinds of electronic goodies are more likely to have either permissive parents, or two working parents. This means less structure and supervision, meaning less work put into school, necessarily leading to poorer grades.
    Agreed.

    10 char
    11-25-10 06:25 PM
  9. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    While I don't put that much faith in polls, it would be interesting to see a breakdown. Just how many dumb phone users, are dumbphone users, and which smartphone was tops in class.
    11-25-10 10:10 PM
  10. middbrew's Avatar
    I think it is an important topic with the number of technology driven avenues available to people these days. I think a cross-sectional study comparing youth "free time" vs "study time" over the last 50 years with parental supervision as a covariate would show that it isn't technology making the difference. It would be my guess that those who had poorer grades 50 years ago would still get poorer grades today. They would just find a different avenue to occupy their time.
    11-26-10 09:44 AM
  11. middbrew's Avatar
    Here's an interesting take on the subject.

    Do Video Games Make Kids Smarter? - ABC News
    11-26-10 09:53 AM
  12. BoldtotheMax's Avatar
    From my own real world experience....

    I grew up an only child in a nice suburb. My parents didn't have a lot of money, but wanted me to go to a good public school. I did, but I struggled with many aspects of my life, from bad grades, not comprehending, because all I cared about and focusing on was when is this class over so I can go to football...or baseball, weightlifting....or home to see my friends and even dare I say, what is on TV.

    Fast forward 16 years later at the ripe age of 34.

    I am now a parent of two kids and two stepdaughters, ages 14 and 13...my kids are 3 and 1. Well my SD's go to a good school system now, but always wasn't the case as they went to public schools in a really bad area as my wife was a single struggling mother just scraping to get by....

    They always have gotten good grades, can comprehend a lot better than I ever could. My point is; They both have cell phones, but are just dummy phones. They do text out the wahzoo though, to the point it is mind bogging. They go over their friends' house when they can and to the movies all while doing their chores before hand.

    IMO it is not technology, it is more so bad parenting for poorer grades as they either don't help them in time of help or just don't care for whatever the reason is.

    Have to make time for your kids...Me and my wife both work, but have altering schedules and we don't see each other much, but we do see our kids a lot and make sure to give them the help they need.

    And if I can't help, then I google the answer, lol!

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-28-10 06:35 AM
  13. pixel8rberry's Avatar
    It's true that kids are more technologically savvy than ever. But bad parenting is the one to blame for a child's shortcomings. My kids have a ton of tech-gadgets, but the access to these "gadgets" is directly tied to their academic achievements. As long a they stay on a gifted level at school, they get whatever gadget/game (age appropriate, of course) they want. Their friends circle is by approval only. I might be a helicopter parent, but my child's future depends on it. But don't worry, the way media pushes crap down our throats, glorifying whores and talentless attention-seekers, the society won't have a shortage of burger flippers any time soon...

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-28-10 02:52 PM
  14. CASH's Avatar
    It's true that kids are more technologically savvy than ever. But bad parenting is the one to blame for a child's shortcomings. My kids have a ton of tech-gadgets, but the access to these "gadgets" is directly tied to their academic achievements. As long a they stay on a gifted level at school, they get whatever gadget/game (age appropriate, of course) they want. Their friends circle is by approval only. I might be a helicopter parent, but my child's future depends on it. But don't worry, the way media pushes crap down our throats, glorifying whores and talentless attention-seekers, the society won't have a shortage of burger flippers any time soon...

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    I agree pixel ate her berry (I know, I know).
    Last edited by CASH; 11-28-10 at 03:33 PM.
    11-28-10 03:12 PM
  15. SCrid2000's Avatar
    It's true that kids are more technologically savvy than ever. But bad parenting is the one to blame for a child's shortcomings. My kids have a ton of tech-gadgets, but the access to these "gadgets" is directly tied to their academic achievements. As long a they stay on a gifted level at school, they get whatever gadget/game (age appropriate, of course) they want. Their friends circle is by approval only. I might be a helicopter parent, but my child's future depends on it. But don't worry, the way media pushes crap down our throats, glorifying whores and talentless attention-seekers, the society won't have a shortage of burger flippers any time soon...

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Ah contrair, the sense of entitlement will prevent them from flipping burgers. There'll be no shortage of welfare dependees.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    11-28-10 03:18 PM
  16. pixel8rberry's Avatar
    ^ that

    and the one above. grrrrrr... LOL
    11-28-10 03:45 PM
  17. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    I see a lot of sharing in our future. Or is it taking
    11-28-10 05:36 PM
  18. SCrid2000's Avatar
    I see a lot of sharing in our future. Or is it taking
    What you call it depends on what end you're on
    11-28-10 11:31 PM
  19. Ike Bee's Avatar
    This story does have some validity to it especially when you consider some of these kids are bad spellers because of texting/SMS. If limits are placed on the tech kids get, then the grades will improve. The video game side of the story to me, has less weight to it. More books, less cell phones, equals better grades.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    12-01-10 05:17 PM
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