1. Sucroid's Avatar
    Statistics about Hearing Loss: "Hearing loss is the fastest growing, and one of the most prevalent, chronic conditions facing Canadians today."

    We have brought our app to many places to give people's hearing an informal check. The results are alarming. Many people in their 40s already can't hear beyond 12kHz!

    Are you having hearing deficits in high frequency? Do a quick check with the FREE app Deeee Classic.
    06-20-12 01:43 PM
  2. patpatiar's Avatar
    is** your hearing at risk?


    anyways, great post, I'll check out the App!

    Cheers
    Rishi
    Sucroid likes this.
    06-20-12 01:51 PM
  3. littd's Avatar
    I am in my 40s and can't hear above 12k but I think that's normal - younger people hear higher frequencies. Great app though!
    06-20-12 03:40 PM
  4. FF22's Avatar
    I was just a a wedding. The volume of the music was actually painful to my quite OLD ears. I walked out of the room.

    If I hold the pb up to my right ear I can barely make out the 12000 but my left ear does not hear it!

    I was just at the audiologist on Monday for an annual. The good part of the report is that in the last year my hearing has remained pretty much stable.
    06-20-12 04:01 PM
  5. jafobabe's Avatar
    Whut?? I can't hear you... LOL J/K...

    In fact I had never realized this until my grandson showed me what they all do with their phones... the ringer is at such a high frequency that only that generation can hear it, and not the teachers!

    Same with a dog whistle... I used to be able to hear that, but not anymore.... so I switched to having parrots.... they talk in english..
    hpjrt, glassofpinot and PiotrJot like this.
    06-20-12 09:44 PM
  6. southlander's Avatar
    I agree people listen to headphones and earbuds at way too high a volume.

    However in human speech the consonants are well below 12k. No need to hear that high in order to get along in life.

    Not saying its good; just saying from a practical point of view- we lose the ability to hear highs as we age. Men loser is faster than women by the way.

    Sent from my BlackBerry Bold 9930 using Tapatalk
    06-20-12 09:53 PM
  7. ffejrobins30's Avatar
    I could hear up past 17.5kHz while my wife said she stopped hearing it at approximately 14kHz. I'm a 30 year old auto mechanic while she's a 28 year old accountant.
    06-20-12 10:20 PM
  8. FF22's Avatar
    I agree people listen to headphones and earbuds at way too high a volume.

    However in human speech the consonants are well below 12k. No need to hear that high in order to get along in life.

    Not saying its good; just saying from a practical point of view- we lose the ability to hear highs as we age. Men loser is faster than women by the way.

    Sent from my BlackBerry Bold 9930 using Tapatalk
    But it's the consonants that I sometimes lose. I have to play rhyming games to figure out the word in the context of what I have understood: So I hear the "ead" part but can't always tell if it was "bread" "dead" "dread" "tread" and so I "play back" what I heard with each of those and fit the context. But, at least, I can still read without needing glasses!!!
    06-21-12 01:58 AM
  9. jafobabe's Avatar
    But it's the consonants that I sometimes lose. I have to play rhyming games to figure out the word in the context of what I have understood: So I hear the "ead" part but can't always tell if it was "bread" "dead" "dread" "tread" and so I "play back" what I heard with each of those and fit the context. But, at least, I can still read without needing glasses!!!
    Oh Geezzzz you just HAD to bring that up... LOL
    06-21-12 03:14 AM
  10. Sucroid's Avatar
    But it's the consonants that I sometimes lose. I have to play rhyming games to figure out the word in the context of what I have understood: So I hear the "ead" part but can't always tell if it was "bread" "dead" "dread" "tread" and so I "play back" what I heard with each of those and fit the context. But, at least, I can still read without needing glasses!!!
    Indeed, consonants become a problem when one lose high-frequency sensitivity. The problem starts to surface when you can no longer hear above 10kHz. And the perception of music drastically changes (everything starts to sound dull).

    Young children normally can hear up to 20kHz. 15kHz for adults in their twenties. If you're in your 40s and can't hear above 10kHz, it's time to visit an audiologist.

    EDIT: It's interesting that high-end stereos always brag about high-frequency reproduction when the average person they are marketed to probably can't hear beyond 15kHz. Having said that, the PB speakers are darn good.
    Last edited by Sucroid; 06-21-12 at 05:59 AM.
    06-21-12 05:55 AM
  11. bounce007's Avatar
    I was just a a wedding. The volume of the music was actually painful to my quite OLD ears. I walked out of the room.

    If I hold the pb up to my right ear I can barely make out the 12000 but my left ear does not hear it!

    I was just at the audiologist on Monday for an annual. The good part of the report is that in the last year my hearing has remained pretty much stable.
    F2 most times when you post I picture a young, BlackBerry using, mountain climbing, bicycle riding, sky diving individual who is technologically savvy... But then you mention how OLD you are lol. At these points I picture... well... a grandpa. lol
    06-21-12 08:14 AM
  12. FF22's Avatar
    F2 most times when you post I picture a young, BlackBerry using, mountain climbing, bicycle riding, sky diving individual who is technologically savvy... But then you mention how OLD you are lol. At these points I picture... well... a grandpa. lol
    Huh, what did you say? Come again!

    Sky Diving! I try keeping busy but lately have been slowing down - Spring weather was not very conducive to the mountains.

    Well, let's just say AARP supplements my Medicaid insurance! But to the consternation of Jafobabe I can still read without glasses!

    A friend older than me just returned from biking the Italian alps. 3,000 to 4,000 (1,000 to 1,300 meters) per day. But she is not to be stopped. I probably could have done part of ONE day!
    jafobabe likes this.
    06-21-12 10:45 AM
  13. rimshot 1's Avatar
    "Come again", Surely you jest!!!!
    06-21-12 11:36 PM
  14. rcm1301's Avatar
    Nevermind the hearing, I think I missed some days. My watch say today's date is 6/21, but this app info in AppWorld say is was released July 8, 2012.

    Item Information

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    Version: 1.0.1
    Release: July 08, 2012
    File Size: 90 KB
    Support Email: support@sucroid.com

    06-21-12 11:45 PM
  15. Sucroid's Avatar
    Nevermind the hearing, I think I missed some days. My watch say today's date is 6/21, but this app info in AppWorld say is was released July 8, 2012.

    Item Information

    Share
    Version: 1.0.1
    Release: July 08, 2012
    File Size: 90 KB
    Support Email: support@sucroid.com

    This has been reported to @BlackBerryDev. It looks like AppWorld is in a time zone a month ahead.
    06-22-12 02:16 AM
  16. ssbtech's Avatar
    I could hear up past 17khz (28y.o. male here) with my Shure headphones. Unfortunately the signal to noise ratio on the PlayBook becomes a problem up at that end, masking the actual frequency somewhat. My room isn't silent either, I could still hear my computer fan in the background.
    06-22-12 04:48 AM
  17. Sucroid's Avatar
    I could hear up past 17khz (28y.o. male here) with my Shure headphones. Unfortunately the signal to noise ratio on the PlayBook becomes a problem up at that end, masking the actual frequency somewhat. My room isn't silent either, I could still hear my computer fan in the background.
    S/N is indeed a bit problematic at the higher extreme. After all, the PB is not a piece of audiophile equipment. Perhaps audio through HDMI would be better though we have not tested this.
    06-22-12 06:40 AM
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