1. collapsed's Avatar
    Can't the apps written in C++ from Android be unpacked then compiled(after a bit of tweaking perhaps) to work on the playbook?
    05-09-12 02:44 PM
  2. zethaaron's Avatar
    Most of them aren't written in C++.
    05-09-12 03:05 PM
  3. Khameleon05's Avatar
    That's exactly what you can already do with every single app and is how sideloaded android apps get made, no?
    05-09-12 03:12 PM
  4. coolaide's Avatar
    Some can. Thats what i was doing trying to get netflix to work before we figured out the drm problem
    05-09-12 03:23 PM
  5. samab's Avatar
    First of all, you can't recompile without the original c++ source code. Merely downloading an Android app from the Google Play store doesn't give you the original source code.

    But most importantly, all the big native games on the Playbook are ported from the iOS source code, not from the Android source code. For example, Galaxy of Fire 2 is available as an iOS and Andriod game --- guess which source code they used to port to the Playbook? It was the iOS source code.

    http://www.fishlabs.net/en/blog/ente...-the-playbook/

    It really gives you an idea that it is easier to port native apps to QNX from iOS than from Android.
    Last edited by samab; 05-09-12 at 03:41 PM.
    05-09-12 03:31 PM
  6. coolaide's Avatar
    Guest i should have said it like this, you can tear down the apk package and make edit to the files and repackage it, then repack again to .bar
    Last edited by coolaide; 05-09-12 at 10:52 PM.
    05-09-12 07:51 PM
  7. GreyGhostRos's Avatar
    Can't the apps written in C++ from Android be unpacked then compiled(after a bit of tweaking perhaps) to work on the playbook?
    You can recompile if you have the original sourcecode with necessary API changes obviously.. Package as proper .bar and run natively..

    That's exactly what you can already do with every single app and is how sideloaded android apps get made, no?
    No.. As far as I understand presently the .apk is repackaged to a .bar so that it can be installed and run in the Android app launcher. The application binary itself is unmodified and runs in a sort of modified Dalvik VM..
    05-09-12 09:27 PM
  8. samab's Avatar
    You can recompile if you have the original sourcecode with necessary API changes obviously.. Package as proper .bar and run natively.
    And of course, all the real life examples have shown that when developers having both the source code for the iOS version and the Android version of said app --- the developers are going to use the iOS version of the source code to port to QNX.

    Porting native Android apps to the Playbook is a non-starter --- because it is much easier to port native iOS apps to the Playbook. Since nobody can make a living just by coding for the Android platform --- all these developers will have iOS versions of their apps to port to the Playbook.
    05-09-12 11:09 PM
  9. SCrid2000's Avatar
    No.. As far as I understand presently the .apk is repackaged to a .bar so that it can be installed and run in the Android app launcher. The application binary itself is unmodified and runs in a sort of modified Dalvik VM..
    Exactly right. The apk is not modified. It is placed in a .zip with essentially a launcher to open it in the Android player.
    It's a tiny bit more complicated,ex than that, but that's the basic idea.
    05-09-12 11:15 PM
  10. samab's Avatar
    It is basically taking a zip file and turning it into a rar file --- nothing was changed except the Playbook app has a different size icon than the original Android app icon.
    05-10-12 12:53 AM
  11. xsacha's Avatar
    I guess you guys are talking about re-compiling the native libraries (the lib/*.so files) for QNX. This is indeed what is required to get any Android apps with native code working on Playbook.
    Of course this means you need the source code for that library, which is most cases you won't have.
    05-10-12 01:23 AM
  12. peter_betos's Avatar
    Guest i should have said it like this, you can tear down the apk package and make edit to the files and repackage it, then repack again to .bar
    You don't want to go the hard steps I got through just to get a non-understandable Java source code. Aside from the .so's, here were the greousome steps I've been through just to get there:

    - Actions as responses to every press on the app UI (which the UI is defined on the xml files) usually resides on a dex file
    - which you then need to decompile to get the series of smali files
    - which then you need to check if some of the codes are utilizing the phone's framework, which then you need to decompile it again this time with framework dependencies
    - which afterwards you need to recompile the smali files as jar
    - which you can then extract and get the class files
    - which afterwards you need to decompile each class file you find and transform it as java file
    - which now you have to understand the logic of each java file (as they are non-understandable due to obfuscation)
    - and finally translate each code to fit into objects the blackberry dev kit tools can understand, especially the imports, which then you would write new codes that would fit your kit

    If that's not hard to you, then by all means, go ahead, and good luck
    Last edited by peter_betos; 05-10-12 at 11:22 AM.
    05-10-12 11:03 AM
  13. collapsed's Avatar
    Then seeing how it's relatively easy to port an iOS app to the Playbook why aren't more developers with iOS apps do that seeing how it's free to submit apps to the appworld and you can even get some money out of it..Last time I check you had to pay to submit an app to the android market(before it changed to gplay)
    05-10-12 11:08 AM
  14. peter_betos's Avatar
    Those are the ones that don't depend on iOS framework, and have their own UI. That's why their code is sometimes directly recompile-able on the native kit. Others that uses the iOS dialog boxes, for example, are too lazy to come up with their own UI, that's why they depend on framework, which Cascades serves purpose of.
    05-10-12 11:16 AM
  15. samab's Avatar
    Then seeing how it's relatively easy to port an iOS app to the Playbook why aren't more developers with iOS apps do that seeing how it's free to submit apps to the appworld and you can even get some money out of it..Last time I check you had to pay to submit an app to the android market(before it changed to gplay)
    I was talking about native games --- which doesn't use native UI toolkits (Cascades) to display buttons and dialog boxes.

    The reason why there aren't much native apps on the Playbook is because regular apps need buttons and dialog boxes --- and Cascades is not ready yet.

    Also game developers know that they have to write cross-platform source code from day one --- to maximize profits by having the same Doom game run on a PC, run on a console or run on a gameboy... --- so their original source code is much easier to port to begin with.
    Last edited by samab; 05-10-12 at 11:44 AM.
    05-10-12 11:29 AM
  16. collapsed's Avatar
    So porting one of those games like Where's my Water, Galaxy on fire(which has been ported but nto yet release i think) shouldn't take the devs too long...I guess some of them just don't want to release their apps for bb10/bb tablet os
    05-11-12 05:42 AM
  17. samab's Avatar
    Porting in "one" day is just PR talk --- it means that they got it running at a very minimum level. Maybe the sound doesn't work, maybe they got 2 frames a second because they have it running without hardware acceleration, then once they got hardware acceleration turn on they still have to optimize various sizes of the graphics so that it matches specific GPU memory size.

    It takes a lot longer to launch Lara Croft on the Playbook than merely just demo'ing it in keynote speech. But the important issue related to this thread is --- they took the iOS source code of Lara Croft to port to the Playbook, they didn't use the Android version of the source code.

    Also there's always people asking where's temple run? --- it's from a 3 people company (husband + wife + graphics artist). They don't have the manpower, they are busy trying to optimize on a million different android devices and they may not even have known about the various porting toolkits that RIM/QNX has come up with.
    05-11-12 10:21 AM
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