05-18-11 12:17 AM
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  1. Dapper37's Avatar
    The PlayBook doesn't need 60,000 Apps to be a huge successes! All this talk about app's is way over done. I will admit, PB is short on app's for now. Lets see how there doing after the summer. The way the App Eco system is going to play out in the future is much more like The best of the top 100. Maybe 1000 it docent matter! The platform that can best deliver the top Apps and help keep them interesting and newish over time will be the over all winner!
    Take FaceBook for instance, Its understood that people spend a tone of time on FB. Some information out there will point out that up to 50% of a percentage of peoples time on the web is on FB. "Thats one App!" I would say the #1 app at this time. It's the iceberg affect, Apps like FB are the ones that you can see and steer a ship around. Whats under the water line matters less and less the deeper you go.
    People love to talk endlessly about 60,000 apps for ISO, that's great, good for them, dose it matter? sure to a small degree. It's a talking point! It get's trotted out every time the media, analyst or an apple fan boy wants to downplay RIM(it work's) Perception is reality I hear the media say when there stroking Apple. hehe... (Bloomberg CNBC you hear me)
    The winning platforms in the future will have the eye on the new emerging App developers that matter. Over time those developers or app's will be brought into the fold of the system that they stand to benefit the most. If they are important enough! Helping to create supper app's and a winning Eco system.
    If 60,000 app's is important and you just have to have them... I ask what else do you do? Do you have any idea how long it would take to download and try out that many apps, just to say Werther you actually like them or not. Too long. Further on that point. Those app's are just a bunch of copies of other app's and it makes it very hard to find the good ones. The number 60,000 app's for the ipad means "nothing" to me! Give me 100 maybe a 1000 good app's in the future and I have zero more time in a lifetime for any more.... Thats putting things in perspective as far as I'm concerned.. Very interested to hear your thought's...
    Last edited by Dapper37; 05-18-11 at 12:32 AM.
    Torontocell likes this.
    05-16-11 05:37 AM
  2. donnation's Avatar
    Ok. And I'm sure we will get nothing but quality apps for the PB. Right now the majority of them are junk.
    Last edited by donnation; 05-16-11 at 05:42 AM.
    trsbbs likes this.
    05-16-11 05:39 AM
  3. drethos's Avatar
    no you maybe right they don't need a plethora of apps. but we need anoff quality apps, we have very few and they are either tat made or a ported game. we need quality developers and not the garbage we saw at launch from the people in it only to get the free playbook. i thought that whole gimmick was a flop.
    trsbbs likes this.
    05-16-11 05:42 AM
  4. ifarlow's Avatar
    It's going to take thousands upon thousands of apps just to get "100 good apps in the future" for two reasons:

    1. There is no way that the next 100 apps will all be hits without some duds, and
    2. What you consider 100 good apps, someone else will consider 100 bad apps.

    There needs to be choice, so the more apps the better. People love to brush off the number of apps in the Apple AppStore with "well, just how many copies of a task app do I need?" The problem with that is some people prefer Appigo's ToDo, while others prefer RTM, while others prefer OmniFocus (and I was one of those). So, if someone was to whittle down the AppStore, which of those task apps should stay, and which should go?

    A greater number of apps, even when there are "repeats," is a good thing. There is no one app that will please everyone, so all of them would need to stay to hit the biggest possible audience. Besides, 60,000 apps should mean something to you... developers are obviously interested in developing for the iOS platforms. I wish the same could be said for the BB/PB platforms. Heck, the NDK that is coming soon for native PB app development won't even have an interface builder, meaning that the environment is all but worthless for developers unless they want to (1) develop games (where the UI has to be developed from scratch anyway), or (2) hand-code the UI. That's a horrible plan by RIM, and has me seriously re-thinking my ownership of the PlayBook. I was hoping that the NDK was going to open the flood gates for higher quality, native non-game apps, but it seems that's not going to be the case. Beyond that, the release version of the NDK isn't expected until fall. Fall! Wow. Way to drag feet, RIM.

    Anyway... the point is that more apps is a good thing, not a bad thing.
    Last edited by ifarlow; 05-16-11 at 05:59 AM.
    howarmat likes this.
    05-16-11 05:50 AM
  5. trsbbs's Avatar
    I agree,, quality not quantity is what is needed. So far only a very few apps have
    caused me to keep them or even download them.

    Most of the games look like old DOS games. Most of the apps have no real use.

    TAT and other goodies will allow for better and more modern apps in the future. I just
    hope its not in the distant future as this is killing the PB right now.

    With the recall of some PBs most meida articles indicate two other items, the PB was released too soon and the lack of quality apps.

    I know RIM has some better apps in the queue, but they haven't got to them or
    have held them up to avoid embarrassing themselves for not having their own app out yet.


    This kind of press is going to hurt RIM and the PB if they do not get something good going and soon!

    http://http://crave.cnet.co.uk/laptops/blackberry-playbook-suffers-limited-recall-over-software-fault-50003758/

    "It doesn't look as though many borked units have actually wound up in the hands of punters -- possibly because no one's buying the thing anyway."

    Wow, this is what I thought when I saw the comment saying the recalled units probably had not been sold yet as
    related to the serial numbers listed. WOW!

    RIM and the good Devs need to be working around the clock to get this great platform up to the level it should be.

    Tim
    Last edited by trsbbs; 05-16-11 at 05:59 AM.
    05-16-11 05:53 AM
  6. Dapper37's Avatar
    Some will come and meny will go, I think most people's time frames are a bit out of touch. Its not a hundred yard dash its more of a marathon. I can hear some people already. I want it all yesterday aswell but thats the truth. RIM is not going to steer this ship off a cliff to please everyone, all at once. They might like to but it's impossible.
    So meny poster's on this site just wanted the PlayBook to launch. They said they would deal with what they had. Now were dealing with it. Those same people are now getting to watch the baby grow! Enjoy!
    Last edited by Dapper37; 05-16-11 at 06:04 AM.
    05-16-11 05:57 AM
  7. trsbbs's Avatar
    "RIM is not going to steer this ship off a cliff "

    I think RIM is capable of doing this on their own. Remember it took them 3 years
    to notice they were getting their **** kicked. They put themselves behind the eight ball and no one else. RIM cannot just play catch up, they need to blow away their rivals and bring new customers into the BB family.

    Don't get me wrong, I love the PB platform and my BB phone, this is why
    I want folks to keep the heat on RIM.

    Tough Love is sometimes needed..

    Tim
    05-16-11 06:18 AM
  8. Dapper37's Avatar
    Buying into the Reinvention of RIM

    by Chris on May 9, 2011


    I have just doubled my position in Research in Motion Ltd. stock after being a shareholder for more than 10 years.

    Last week, I flew to Orlando to attend RIMs BlackBerry World conference along with 6,000 others. I wrote an article here outlining the challenges I saw for RIM and how I planned to use this conference to gain insight into the companys future. In three jam-packed days, I got more answers than I had hoped for.

    In last weeks article, I focused on the need for RIM to become a stronger software company and to reflect this strength in developer tools and compelling applications. In my mind, software execution is more important than marketing, more important than hardware, and poised to be the crucial factor in moving the stock over the next 12 to 24 months.

    RIM started off the conference with the announcement of the new BlackBerry Bold 9900, featuring a super-fast processor, powerful graphics, a touch screen and physical keyboard, along with the new BlackBerry 7 operating system. I was shocked by how light, thin and fast this device feels. Even though this is still a legacy Java operating system, it delivers a great user experience.

    I realize there is short-term risk in buying stock because RIM absolutely has to get the new BlackBerry Bold and other devices out in time for back-to-school shopping late this summer. If they miss this window, the stock will get crushed. Judging from the demo unit I tested, though, I think the chances of a miss are small: It feels close to being market-ready.

    The real story here is about three companies that RIM has acquired over the last year: QNX Systems, Torch Mobile and The Astonishing Tribe (TAT). They bring to the table a new operating system, a fantastic web browser and, in a first for RIM, slick user-interface design skills.

    Weve already seen the QNX operating system and Torch browser implemented in the recently launched BlackBerry PlayBook. The Swedish TAT team is now poised to solve one of RIMs most visible problems a lack of what RIM co-chief executive officer Jim Balsillie refers to as consumer delight. Too many of RIMs applications lack the good looks and suave effects of Apples iOS and Googles Android operating systems.

    Let me tell you about the fall of 2008, when RIM held its first BlackBerry Developer Conference, which I attended. Apple had just released the iPhone 3G, and it was a weird time for RIM: Inside the conference presentations, the topic was BlackBerry, but in the hallway, everyone was talking about getting busy with iPhone development. There was concern over RIMs future, and I would say that this concern continued during RIM developer conferences in 2009 and 2010.

    Last week in Orlando I detected the return of BlackBerry enthusiasm among developers. QNX, Torch and TAT are the primary reason for this, helped by a partnership with Adobe. This technically savvy audience is buying into the reinvention of RIM.

    Why is this not reflected in the stock price? The Street is too distracted by the near-term shortcomings of the new products, such as the PlayBook, and RIMs recent profit warning, driven by a slip in BlackBerry 7 launch timing.

    There is no denying that the PlayBook is unpolished. It is riddled with relatively minor bugs, and the BlackBerry Bridge app, which lets you get e-mail on the PlayBook, is far from a perfect experience out of the gate.

    But the bones are solid. The way developers responded in Orlando is akin to watching an architect look at a beautiful piece of undeveloped coastline. And the new developer tools that are either available now, or will be within the next few months, are akin to the building materials that the architect uses to craft the house of your dreams.

    Ask anyone where else RIM has fallen down and youll inevitably hear about poor marketing. I agree that the company has done a poor job communicating its capabilities and road map to investors and the media. But there is hope even on the marketing front.

    In Orlando, RIM had attendees saying things like, This was the best conference Ive ever attended. How did they achieve this? They put on a good show, but they put on an even better party. They rented out half of Universal Studios and provided great food, music and an open bar. They also gave every single guest a free BlackBerry PlayBook. This set of decisions was probably the best marketing move RIM has ever made.

    Apart from convincing developers that their new QNX-based BlackBerry platform will deliver the goods, theyve just invested in 6,000 ambassadors who are walking around telling their customers how much they love their PlayBook.

    Thats an uptrend I want to be in front of.

    Its not all bad new's guy. Relax.
    05-16-11 06:24 AM
  9. trsbbs's Avatar
    "Buying into the Reinvention of RIM"

    Good read and I "might" buy some back myself, sold it off 9 months ago, But,,they need to prove they can execute better then they have of late.
    They also need to present themselves better in the press and in media ads.

    They can do it, they have the tools and talant as long as they stop
    shooting themselves in the foot.

    Tim
    05-16-11 06:31 AM
  10. Dapper37's Avatar
    "RIM is not going to steer this ship off a cliff "

    I think RIM is capable of doing this on their own. Remember it took them 3 years
    to notice they were getting their **** kicked. They put themselves behind the eight ball and no one else. RIM cannot just play catch up, they need to blow away their rivals and bring new customers into the BB family.

    Don't get me wrong, I love the PB platform and my BB phone, this is why
    I want folks to keep the heat on RIM.

    Tough Love is sometimes needed..

    Tim
    Ok yes they were late to respond. "They responded" they will continue to respond. Nobody has lost more money in RIM stock then Jim and Mike and thats one **** of a motivator.
    I understand business, There's a tone of things that would put all our harts to rest that RIM just cannot disclose right now. It take's time..
    Your right they do need to hear the heat. Here's to tough love!
    05-16-11 06:32 AM
  11. eds817's Avatar
    Maybe some of us want 60,000 apps on our PlayBook. Maybe we want to spend hours scrolling to find the one we needed an hour ago.
    05-16-11 06:38 AM
  12. Dapper37's Avatar
    Maybe some of us want 60,000 apps on our PlayBook. Maybe we want to spend hours scrolling to find the one we needed an hour ago.
    Fair enough, In the end I hope you get them. You never bought you PlayBook thinking they were going to be there. No point in crying then! Not yet by any mean's. This point goes out to the masses, you know..
    Last edited by Dapper37; 05-16-11 at 06:48 AM.
    05-16-11 06:45 AM
  13. donnation's Avatar
    Dapper37,

    Great write up. I too have held stock in RIM for many years, and while I have sold off a good portion of it I've flirted with acquiring more because I'm hopeful for RIM's future. My main concern with RIM is timing. Forget the playbook, as that is not where RIM's heavy interest lays. Yes than can put a dent in the tablet market, bu the majority of their time needs to be spent in the mobile phone market. I've watched RIM for years squander time and opportunity to develop a mobile platform that can compete with the likes of Apple and Google.

    All I hear constantly are excuses and to "wait" while they acquire companies to do this or that. There comes a time when they have to put their money where their mouth is. Here we are in May and RIM still doesnt have a phone that is up to 2011 specs. They only announce 1 phone at the conference, which does look nice, but has no firm release date? This is typical RIM. I don't understand why they are constantly late to the market and can't get phones out on time. I don't expect them to churn out a new phone every month like the Android platform does, but at least once a year they should come out with something fresh and not just churn out another Bold or Curve model of phone. Can't they see that those models are played out?

    I wish them the best but if their next batch of phones fails to catch on I think they are going to see a major defection of blackberry loyalists.
    Last edited by donnation; 05-16-11 at 06:49 AM.
    05-16-11 06:46 AM
  14. Dapper37's Avatar
    Here are what some app dev are say as of May 11. At the Scotia Capital event in Toronto



    BlackBerry 7 is just BlackBerry 6 that actually works.

    - From an enterprise developer who was answering a question about whether or not developers would spend time on developing for BB7 given the soon-to-be existence of QNX on phones. His point is simple. BB7 is not really new. Its just a better, more stable BB6. Of course developers will use it. Another developer pointed out what I mentioned in my BlackBerry World posts. You cant stop developing for in-market devices and wait for upcoming devices. Thats like not eating because next years food will taste better.


    RIM knocked it out of the park last week

    - From a developer who was speaking about the BlackBerry World conference last week in Orlando. This lines up exactly with the message I was writing about. Developers have noticed the improvements RIM is making and they are impressed. This is good news.


    Microsofts biggest asset is not Nokia, its XBOX

    - From a developer who points out that mobile gaming is becoming much bigger than console gaming. Its not bigger yet, but it probably will be within a few years. The cost of developing for consoles is huge. The cost of developing for mobile platforms is NOT huge. XBOX games can be ported to Windows Phone fairly easily, he suggests. The interesting side note is that this is a very BAD trend for Nintendo. A possible short?


    Weve been to every major OEM conference in the last few years and were really encouraged

    - From a developer who was also speaking about QNX, and RIMs progress after attending BlackBerry World. I hope this puts to rest all the BS comments about Oh, those guys paid to go to BBWorld. Theyre biased. They are RIM fans. Bull crap. There you have it straight from their mouth. They attend ALL of the OEM conferences. They have to. Its their livelihood. Get it?

    Kudos to Gus at Scotia Capital for putting on an awesome conference especially considering the short planning cycle he had. If he does it again next year it will probably be even better.

    The tide is turning!!!!
    05-16-11 06:58 AM
  15. bostonnerd's Avatar
    Here are what some app dev are say as of May 11. At the Scotia Capital event in Toronto

    BlackBerry 7 is just BlackBerry 6 that actually works.

    - From an enterprise developer who was answering a question about whether or not developers would spend time on developing for BB7 given the soon-to-be existence of QNX on phones. His point is simple. BB7 is not really new. Its just a better, more stable BB6. Of course developers will use it. Another developer pointed out what I mentioned in my BlackBerry World posts. You cant stop developing for in-market devices and wait for upcoming devices. Thats like not eating because next years food will taste better.
    And none of those cool new APIs will be available to the massive installed base of OS 5 and 6 devices. Nor will OS 7 be available to any n-1 device period. So.....what reason does a developer have to leverage OS7 again?

    If OS 7 is really "OS 6 that works", why was the versioning changed from 6.1?
    05-16-11 07:11 AM
  16. Dapper37's Avatar
    Dapper37,

    Great write up. I too have held stock in RIM for many years, and while I have sold off a good portion of it I've flirted with acquiring more because I'm hopeful for RIM's future. My main concern with RIM is timing. Forget the playbook, as that is not where RIM's heavy interest lays. Yes than can put a dent in the tablet market, bu the majority of their time needs to be spent in the mobile phone market. I've watched RIM for years squander time and opportunity to develop a mobile platform that can compete with the likes of Apple and Google.

    All I hear constantly are excuses and to "wait" while they acquire companies to do this or that. There comes a time when they have to put their money where their mouth is. Here we are in May and RIM still doesnt have a phone that is up to 2011 specs. They only announce 1 phone at the conference, which does look nice, but has no firm release date? This is typical RIM. I don't understand why they are constantly late to the market and can't get phones out on time. I don't expect them to churn out a new phone every month like the Android platform does, but at least once a year they should come out with something fresh and not just churn out another Bold or Curve model of phone. Can't they see that those models are played out?

    I wish them the best but if their next batch of phones fails to catch on I think they are going to see a major defection of blackberry loyalists.
    Thanks! and your right. the last years have been very painfull to watch with anticipation of thing's to come. That were just around the corner. Once the corner was turned someone else was there already. All true
    RIM is not a company like Apple or Google and can not! opperate like those two. If you if you look back at the opperation of the corportion over the last few years you wont find meny missteps. Product releases are another story, although they do sell a lot of units and we all love there stuff, others will bring up thing's like the Storm 1 for sure. Any other trouble I dont remember.
    This is it! the next twelve months are make or break. It's not that Im giving them yet another chance. It's that the first chance at change has just taken that long. Change your perspective a bit and look at what they've done right over that time and you should understand what I'm taking about.
    "DONT LOSE YOUR CORE!" They never did!
    05-16-11 07:13 AM
  17. dennie82's Avatar
    Yes, I need more apps.
    05-16-11 07:16 AM
  18. Dapper37's Avatar
    If OS 7 is really "OS 6 that works", why was the versioning changed from 6.1?[/QUOTE]

    So meny of the haters point's just dont matter. Again and again, who care's buddy!
    05-16-11 07:20 AM
  19. bostonnerd's Avatar
    If OS 7 is really "OS 6 that works", why was the versioning changed from 6.1?
    So meny of the haters point's just dont matter. Again and again, who care's buddy![/QUOTE]

    Hardly a hater. I've been a Fortune 500 user of the BB since the first BES was deployed to Enterprise users. I've also been involved in OS development for a number of decades, and have been in Technology since Nixon was president. So yes, I do have some knowledge and insight into this area.

    Announcing a point release (6.1) and stating that it won't be supported on the thousands of existing 6.0 BB devices in a Fortune 500 company is analogous to Microsoft announcing that the next Windows 7 Service Pack will no longer be supported on all your existing desktops and laptops currently running Windows 7. Changing the nomenclature to BB OS 7 doesn't change that fact.
    Last edited by Bostonnerd; 05-16-11 at 07:44 AM.
    05-16-11 07:32 AM
  20. donnation's Avatar
    Thanks! and your right. the last years have been very painfull to watch with anticipation of thing's to come. That were just around the corner. Once the corner was turned someone else was there already. All true
    RIM is not a company like Apple or Google and can not! opperate like those two. If you if you look back at the opperation of the corportion over the last few years you wont find meny missteps. Product releases are another story, although they do sell a lot of units and we all love there stuff, others will bring up thing's like the Storm 1 for sure. Any other trouble I dont remember.
    This is it! the next twelve months are make or break. It's not that Im giving them yet another chance. It's that the first chance at change has just taken that long. Change your perspective a bit and look at what they've done right over that time and you should understand what I'm taking about.
    "DONT LOSE YOUR CORE!" They never did!
    Agreed and good insight. Thanks for the informative information and I'll continue to hang in there and hope for the best.
    05-16-11 08:04 AM
  21. Dapper37's Avatar
    So meny of the haters point's just dont matter. Again and again, who care's buddy!
    Hardly a hater. I've been a Fortune 500 user of the BB since the first BES was deployed to Enterprise users. I've also been involved in OS development for a number of decades, and have been in Technology since Nixon was president. So yes, I do have some knowledge and insight into this area.

    Announcing a point release (6.1) and stating that it won't be supported on the thousands of existing 6.0 BB devices in a Fortune 500 company is analogous to Microsoft announcing that the next Windows 7 Service Pack will no longer be supported on all your existing desktops and laptops currently running Windows 7. Changing the nomenclature to BB OS 7 doesn't change that fact.[/QUOTE]

    Clearly your a bigger deal and far more tech savvy than I. I think you would rather us all believe that BB suport for pervious devices is all but ready to stop and thats just what the quotes from Dev's in toronto were say was not going to happen. You perhaps have information I do not.
    All I have tried to do with my post is be realistic about the situation regarding App development. Draging me into a fight about old OS and the future support of it is not where I was going. Perhaps your own thread is needed.
    I will say that you fit the bill as it is with certain poster's on this site that tend to over exaggerate the truth. What I got from the dev's quote was that the two will not be hard to work with and the differances for them are nil, further that they intend to support both . Is the world going to stop for the poor fortune 500 with the change in OS? Most people are wanting new and better hardware. Others will never be happy. You go ahead and condemn.
    RIM has to make certain calls in it's business. Given all they deal with I dont imagine it's always easy. I'm sure you have the answer's though... So go ahead and post them!
    Last edited by Dapper37; 05-16-11 at 08:18 AM.
    05-16-11 08:15 AM
  22. hellnback76's Avatar
    All very interesting points. I guess I am somewhere in the middle 60K is unnecessary, however the apps that are on their now are irrelevant and not very useful or enjoyable. Can someone make some recommendations of their favorite apps in App World in any category. I like geek peek, doodle blast, but I am looking for that one really cool professional app. Thanks.
    05-16-11 08:19 AM
  23. naudurivsm's Avatar
    My expectations - I think RIM should work on making PB a truly professional grade tablet and business friendly with more business applications/ apps that people can actually use it as laptop replacements in performing some critical day to day functions ( not saying complete laptop replacement) that is handy and portable. rather than creating 1000s of apps (Ipad type) and making PB more of a media player or an entertainment slate. I am sure this is not the intent of RIM.

    I personally would like this more business friendly with a nice mixture of other important social networking/ communication / games etc for Off business hours usage.

    my thoughts are getting apps or applications like with Java support
    Ability to connect to MS Sharepoint / BMC Remedy/ eRoom/ and many such other applications.
    VNC is great tool and is already there.
    Support for WebEx or other such tools for true video conferencing / file sharing sharing ( not just video chat applications for entertainment)
    05-16-11 09:07 AM
  24. Dapper37's Avatar
    It seems that any thread on CB turns out to be a brawl of oppinions of wether RIM will survive or if they did this or that right. I only wanted to state what I thought about app development. Having said that here is an artical that will fill in some of the gap's with regard to where thier going. With regards to App dev as well as other stuff. RIM far from out of the fight!
    Its a good read!

    By Kevin Fitchard

    Taking a few licks from Apple and Android has forced RIM to open up, which ultimately could be the key to its revival



    It's amazing what you can do when you rule the smartphone heap. You can dictate terms to operators, lock popular services and applications down to your proprietary OS, and rule over your developer program with an iron fist. That sums up Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL), iTunes, the App Store and the iPhone’s exclusive distribution deals, but I could just as easily be talking about Research in Motion (NASDAQ:RIMM) four years ago.




    Before the advent of the iPhone and Android, the BlackBerry was the only game in town when it came to enterprise email. Operators lined up to offer the iconic black messaging nuggets and the smartphones that followed, lured by the lucrative data plans the BlackBerry brought. RIM, however, maintained tight control of the customer relationship, sending every email through its data centers and controlling directly or indirectly the licensing of BlackBerry Enterprise Server (BES) which all of its business synchronization services sprang from.


    Like Apple, RIM kept its core services close to its vest. Except with a brief flirtation with BlackBerry Connect--which went nowhere--RIM’s core push e-mail and enterprise services have remained locked to its devices. Just as Apple states in its commercials: “If you don’t have an iPhone, you don’t have an iPod in your phone,” RIM previously could have claimed “if you don’t have a BlackBerry than you don’t have truly enterprise-class e-mail in your phone.”


    RIM never took Apple’s micromanaging approach to app development and distribution (at least not until the launch of the PlayBook), but then again its developer resources were always limited, offering up Java as a development platform, while the core applications of BlackBerry remained in house. Apart from the suite of powerful enterprise apps it and its partners developed, BlackBerry apps were nothing to get excited about regardless of whether they came from BlackBerry App World or some other source.


    Now everything that made BlackBerry BlackBerry is changing.


    Among the stream of new products and announcements at BlackBerry World this week, RIM executives revealed they would open up BES, extending BlackBerry’s core device management, provisioning and push synchronization technology to iPhones, iPads, and Android phones and tablets. That tidbit got a bit lost among the swirl of BlackBerry OS 7 and new device news at BlackBerry World, but its impact could be huge. RIM is moving away from being solely a device company to one that focuses on stand-alone services. Think of how many enterprises that already have huge investments sunk in BES, yet have to figure out a way to bring non-BlackBerry phones and tablets into the fold. Today they must support another enterprise platform right alongside BES. RIM has realized it can’t force its customers to remain all BlackBerry device shops, but it can keep them all BlackBerry Enterprise server shops.


    But RIM’s opening up in other ways, too. The PlayBook won’t just be another isolated BlackBerry product. Instead RIM is either now or plans to support reams of different development platforms, programs and options (CP: RIM: PlayBook strategy may seem schizophrenic, but there’s a bigger plan at work). It may not be able to build a native developer community as big as Google’s (NASDAQ:GOOG), but it can poach applications from the Android community by supporting a runtime. Apple may not work with Adobe, but the PlayBook will feature Adobe’s AIR front and center. RIM may come third or fourth in the pecking order when it comes to choose a developer program, but with porting solutions like the Unity Game Engine and the IdeaWorks Labs’ AirPlay, developers can develop for Android, Apple and RIM simultaneously.


    In some ways, RIM is following a similar strategy to Google. Google wants Android to succeed because it provides a friendly home for Google mobile services, but it’s certainly not limiting G-mail, Google Talk, search, Maps and the like to Android phones only. It’s signing up distribution deals and loading those apps into stores. Google is a services company that became an OS—and less successfully, a device—vendor to ensure it could never be locked out of the mobile market. RIM now appears to be taking the opposite approach. It’s a device company becoming a services company to ensure that its BlackBerry devices never lose their elevated position in the enterprise market.


    RIM’s Tablet OS—and eventually smartphone OS—strategy represent the same thinking. Give developers so many options, they can’t help but provide apps for the BlackBerry platform. The more apps, the more useful the devices become and the more appeal they have, which should eventually drive native development efforts, which in turn will produce more and better apps, and so on. The only counterproductive thing to that strategy is RIM’s decision to lock down app distribution to BlackBerry App World—at least for the PlayBook. RIM probably wants to exert some control, but like Apple it probably wants to make some money off of apps, too. That might work if you’re sitting pretty at the top of the smartphone development heap like Apple, but RIM probably needs to be opening up new distribution channels, not shutting them down.


    Years from now Apple may be forced to make a similar choice. It’s hard to imagine the iPhone’s momentum faltering, but it’s happened to Apple’s computing products before. As long as it’s the smartphone king, it can continue dictating terms just as RIM did in the past. But if Android continues to grow at its current pace and if Microsoft’s (NASDAQ:MSFT) Windows Phone 7 or even the new BlackBerry were to challenge Apple further, Apple might decouple its services from its devices, just as it did with iTunes for the PC.


    Meanwhile RIM plans to use its ace in the hole, enterprise email, to claw its way back into the market through services, hoping that BlackBerry devices can keep up. Even if devices don’t fully recover, enterprise services is not a bad business to be in, especially one as lucrative as BES.


    Interestingly enough, the big surprise at BlackBerry World was the surprise appearance of Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer to announce that Bing would become the default search engine on future BlackBerrys. Microsoft and RIM are heading on the same trajectory. They’re competitors in the enterprise space, but they’re both underdogs in mobile now, and they’re willing to use one another to reverse their fortunes. RIM sells a lot more BlackBerrys than Microsoft does Windows devices, so Microsoft is the immediate beneficiary. How does Microsoft pay RIM back? Maybe by supporting BES services on WP7 phones, right alongside Microsoft’s competitive Activesync.
    Last edited by Dapper37; 05-16-11 at 09:44 AM.
    05-16-11 09:42 AM
  25. Morten's Avatar
    The PlayBook doesn't need 60,000 Apps to be a huge successes! ...
    That is correct. BUT - we do need Good apps - and RIM market the device as a "professional grade" device, something we don't see reflected in any of the apps given us so far. Even RIM's own official apps are more like test apps in early alpha stage.

    I am also very disappointed with the OS itself. BlackBerry devices are known for their customizability - something we dont see at all on the PlayBook, not even alarm tunes can be choosen (except from the default 3)
    WiFi -we need option to choose to use the b/g or n, cause now it jumps between them and makes trouble.

    Inconsistency in all apps delivered with the OS. Not good.
    In my work I need to take pictures - send pictures to clients - receive pictures from them for review etc... So - I have currently around 2500 pictures on the PlayBook. Browsing the folders from the Picture app looks ok - at first - till you realize it is not possible to view portrait pictures.
    Then - mailing the pictures... starting the e-mail app - attach file,.. and there - all 2500 files in one level - with NO filename or anything... Yes I can search for picture... Lets see - start back the picture app - browse and find the picture - let's find the filename... NOT POSSIBLE ... NO info at all...
    So - its completely useless....

    After talking to RIM support to get some info - they all advice me to browse the files from my laptop - and then e-mail them.. WHAT? If i need a laptop - WHY would I need the PlayBook?

    I have been reading about people saying the PlayBook makes them so much more productive than ever and how they get work done... I wonder...

    The next thing; Opening up some notes from the Bridged Notes application, copying some text, opening Word-To-Go on the PlayBook to Paste the text,.. but - instead of text - only rubbish appear... A typical codepage/ASCII issue that of course should have been solved in the OS.

    Selection Text is a nightmare. Trying to get the marker in front of the first letter on a line takes time... Why not make some easy selection?


    The way things are right now - the PlayBook is just some overpriced Media player - with a web browser.

    Am sorry to say - I really like the form-factor, the display, speed etc... but - without a proper integrated OS, Apps with a minimum of features following of course the PB's UI (swipe menus etc..) - its just like a Ferrari without gasoline. Nice hardware, but - can't do much about it.

    One thing RIM could have done at this moment, is to let US know what is going on, which fixes are we waiting for, what features are to come etc.. that way we could choose to ditch the PB, or wait on fixes...
    05-16-11 10:23 AM
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