1. monotok's Avatar
    Don't get me wrong, they are really useful however they are used as a monopoliser to get you into their ecosystem and keep you there.
    I wish they had one app store for all devices! Or at least have all apps in all stores!

    I hate the fact that when I buy something in one store, if I change devices I have to buy the same thing again! Even if I never use that app again, not exactly like I can sell it on like PC software!

    It is so annoying, it stops people choosing the devices they really want, yes I like my playbook but it is not massively useful to me atm.
    However if all devices (Android, IOS, WebOS, BB) shared the same app stores then it would be number one tablet!
    Like atm for me having two HD cameras is pointless as I and my family use Skype (Yes I know it has been mentioned) and I wouldn't use them for anything and also the GPS is a waste for me as I would like some offline Ordnance Survey maps too as I have the storage space for them.

    Just really bugs me as it seems to be weather a device dies or not, manufactures can't really distinguish themselves with different OS's either.

    Rant Over
    02-23-12 05:19 PM
  2. Jean-luc_Picard's Avatar
    This type of problem is everywhere. Buy an app on Windows and you won't necessarily be able to run it on Mac. Buy a case for your 9900 and it won't fit your iPhone. Buy a book from Kindle and you can't read it on another eBook reader. It's an unfortunate part of corporate politics, but since it increases profit it's going to continue long into the future, so get used to it...
    02-23-12 06:09 PM
  3. BuzzStarField's Avatar
    Don't get me wrong, they are really useful however they are used as a monopoliser to get you into their ecosystem and keep you there.
    I wish they had one app store for all devices! Or at least have all apps in all stores!

    Rant Over
    I am a developer, so let me say a few words about your rant. The first thing that I would like to point out is that RIM doesn't own my app - I do. The second thing that you need to know is that if I write an app that runs on, say a PlayBook, it will not run on, say, an Android device. This is because they are two entirely different apps. Even though, they may have exactly the same name and do more or less the same things, they are written using two distinct sets of development tools.

    Given that it is a lot of work to re-write an app using several different programming languages, I think that it is reasonable to charge the user separately for each offering. Further, because a separate version is required for each platform, it is utterly impossible to meet your expectation that there should be one app store for all devices. The only way this would be possible, would be if all the device manufacturers could agree on one particular ecosystem. - meaning one operating system and a single hardware architecture and configuration. Now that would be a monopoly for you. Could you live with this situation?
    ffejrobins30, kbz1960 and Barljo like this.
    02-23-12 06:46 PM
  4. r0v3rT3N's Avatar
    @BuzzStarField
    Thanks for that.
    US DEVELOPERS OWN OUR OWN APPLICATIONS!
    We made it it's our property.
    The only way this does not apply is if your application is open source, but that's a whole different story!
    02-23-12 06:53 PM
  5. Snoman002's Avatar
    If you hate App stores then try living in the Windows Mobile days. It was like trying to find a specific app with that app either hidden inside one of a hundred forums, or on an individual website.

    Fricking Aweful
    02-23-12 07:08 PM
  6. monotok's Avatar
    I am a developer, so let me say a few words about your rant. The first thing that I would like to point out is that RIM doesn't own my app - I do. The second thing that you need to know is that if I write an app that runs on, say a PlayBook, it will not run on, say, an Android device. This is because they are two entirely different apps. Even though, they may have exactly the same name and do more or less the same things, they are written using two distinct sets of development tools.

    Given that it is a lot of work to re-write an app using several different programming languages, I think that it is reasonable to charge the user separately for each offering. Further, because a separate version is required for each platform, it is utterly impossible to meet your expectation that there should be one app store for all devices. The only way this would be possible, would be if all the device manufacturers could agree on one particular ecosystem. - meaning one operating system and a single hardware architecture and configuration. Now that would be a monopoly for you. Could you live with this situation?
    I understand that, What I am talking about it is hoping for a future where apps can be written in a universal language, like HTML5 and Javascript, correct me if I am wrong but I think most devices support that and it seems more and more apps will be written in HTML5 in the future.

    I know that each device has it's native language and development IDE's for high performance apps and games, obviously these can't be made in HTML5 and might/not be in all stores because they would require re coding.

    I know that the universal app store I had will not ever happen even though it would be nice, even though Linux can do it with their different distros (although they are all written in C) but maybe where most apps are written in a universal language such as HTML then it would be easier to have them in all stores and that would be great for both developer and consumer.


    This type of problem is everywhere. Buy an app on Windows and you won't necessarily be able to run it on Mac.
    Well with apps like Adobe Master Suite, I could deactivate my license on the Mac and move it to Windows when I changed OS's. Although Apps on the Playbook cost nothing compared to that haha
    02-23-12 07:25 PM
  7. BuzzStarField's Avatar
    @BuzzStarField
    Thanks for that.
    US DEVELOPERS OWN OUR OWN APPLICATIONS!
    We made it it's our property.
    The only way this does not apply is if your application is open source, but that's a whole different story!
    The idea that RIM owns my app sometimes amuses me, sometimes not so much. I found the OP's rant merely amusing. On the other hand, I find it particularly galling when a consumer rationalizes piracy and other high crimes by reasoning that the nasty behavior somehow punishes the big bad corporate monopoly.

    It would be good if everyone who is tempted to avoid my minimal asking price would think twice before sideloading my app. After all, I don't think we charge too much for our offerings considering how much work goes into them.
    02-23-12 07:31 PM
  8. monotok's Avatar
    When I wrote my little rant I was in a mood at that time so I was not thinking everything through at the time

    yep some of what I said would never work but it would be nice if it was lol
    02-23-12 07:34 PM
  9. BuzzStarField's Avatar
    When I wrote my little rant I was in a mood at that time so I was not thinking everything through at the time

    yep some of what I said would never work but it would be nice if it was lol
    Apology accepted.
    02-23-12 07:37 PM
  10. jtokarchuk's Avatar
    The idea that RIM owns my app sometimes amuses me, sometimes not so much. I found the OP's rant merely amusing. On the other hand, I find it particularly galling when a consumer rationalizes piracy and other high crimes by reasoning that the nasty behavior somehow punishes the big bad corporate monopoly.

    It would be good if everyone who is tempted to avoid my minimal asking price would think twice before sideloading my app. After all, I don't think we charge too much for our offerings considering how much work goes into them.
    Further to that point: it is that same nasty behavior that in turn punishes us developers, as the less people are willing to pay for applications, the less developers will be motivated to spend the time.
    02-23-12 07:45 PM
  11. kbz1960's Avatar
    Can I ask.......well I am. Does it tick you off when a free app that is similar comes out?
    02-23-12 08:12 PM
  12. BuzzStarField's Avatar
    Further to that point: it is that same nasty behavior that in turn punishes us developers, as the less people are willing to pay for applications, the less developers will be motivated to spend the time.
    I like the way that RIM runs a tight ship with respect to Apply World. I don't mind that they get 30% of the proceeds. They give me a place to market my product and protect me from the nastier aspects of Internet commerce. So it's worth the price I have to pay. There are some problems that need to be fixed, no doubt about it, but generally speaking RIM runs a secure market. I believe a well-managed app store, is good for developer and consumer alike. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.
    jtokarchuk likes this.
    02-23-12 08:20 PM
  13. monotok's Avatar
    Can I ask.......well I am. Does it tick you off when a free app that is similar comes out?
    No, I was more talking about really expensive apps when I said its annoying paying for the same app on both platforms and I had navigon which is 50 on wp7 lol
    02-23-12 08:38 PM
  14. BuzzStarField's Avatar
    Can I ask.......well I am. Does it tick you off when a free app that is similar comes out?
    This is a highly competitive market and for better or for worse, I experience human emotions. As a professional , I do get annoyed when someone under-values their work even when I am not in direct competition with the free app. My first instinct is that the practice drives overall prices down to artificially low levels and makes it tough to make a living. On the other hand, I have confidence that I can add enough value to justify setting a non-zero price to my own offering and sell a few copies. So if I take a deep breath and count to ten, I can recover my composure and rationalize that I'm in this racket just for the fun of it - if I happen to make a little money it's a bonus. It's a lie, of course, but it helps get me through the day.
    kbz1960 likes this.
    02-23-12 09:11 PM
  15. kill_9's Avatar
    The idea that RIM owns my app sometimes amuses me, sometimes not so much. I found the OP's rant merely amusing. On the other hand, I find it particularly galling when a consumer rationalizes piracy and other high crimes by reasoning that the nasty behavior somehow punishes the big bad corporate monopoly.

    It would be good if everyone who is tempted to avoid my minimal asking price would think twice before sideloading my app. After all, I don't think we charge too much for our offerings considering how much work goes into them.
    While I have never used your application, I make every effort to support developers of non-free applications when the quality warrants me purchasing the application. To date there are approximately 50% free application and 50% paid applications on the BlackBerry PlayBooks for which I am responsible; these figures do not include the applications provided with the tablet operating system and user environment bundle.
    02-23-12 10:23 PM
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