05-25-11 07:24 PM
26 12
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  1. IvanAMANation's Avatar
    ...can it be that big companies, like Skype and Netflix are holding out on purpose to raise the value of there apps?

    Before anyone bashes me, this is just something that I was thinking. Its not that serious.

    1st scenerio:

    I was wonder since these big name app companies have had great success with iOS, and Android maybe they do not want to burn bridges with Apple and Google? Or is that Apple and Google are paying them in some way shape or form, e.g Stocks maybe?

    It just boggles my mind that these companies wouldnt develop for the PB. Why not? Is it that hard? Is it that expensive to develop an app???

    2nd:

    Can it be they know RIM was/is relying on QNX for there comeback, and in order to compete in the tablet wars againts google and Apple with apps they're going to need those big named apps like Skype and Netflix, and if they just hold out long enough, RIM would pay top dollar for it??? Could they think that RIM is that desperate?

    WHAT EVER THE REASON IS, it seems like an organized attempt to sabotage RIM's PB, and new OS.

    I just cant figure out the big question that dangles in my head that says "WHY NOT PUT YOUR APP OUT ASAP FOR THIS NEW COOL DEVICE?!"
    Last edited by IvanAMANation; 05-25-11 at 12:11 AM.
    jasg999 likes this.
    05-25-11 12:07 AM
  2. semicoln's Avatar
    Yes, it is expensive to develop apps you are willing to attach your name to. Doesn't matter the platform. PlayBook still is too new and there are still too few out in the world to justify the effort but so far it looks like the PlayBook has the momentum that it needs behind it. This will be especially true if they can get it in the hands of corporate customers.

    Netflix, Skype, and even Google themselves really don't care what platform you use to access their services. They make money from the services (or in the case of Google, advertising). This is why they give the apps (or in the case of Google, a whole OS) away for free, just to get it in as many hands as possible. BUT they still need to know that there are enough potential "hands" on a platform to make the equation balance out.
    05-25-11 12:19 AM
  3. lnichols's Avatar
    Or since RIM is going to support Android, a lot of these companies decided to not build a Playbook specific app and instead let the Android version serve both. This Android support is a double edged sword in that regard IMHO.
    05-25-11 06:01 AM
  4. arieh's Avatar
    Or since RIM is going to support Android, a lot of these companies decided to not build a Playbook specific app and instead let the Android version serve both. This Android support is a double edged sword in that regard IMHO.
    Excellent point. Why write a PB app when you can wait and see how your existing Android app runs on the PB?
    05-25-11 06:08 AM
  5. drethos's Avatar
    yes droid and apple are black balling us. we must show storng support for our product. we must fight the powers and over come this adversity. its going to be an up hill battle, but it will be a good fight.
    btw i hate the idea of the droid players,but rim knows native apps are going to be a fight to get.
    05-25-11 06:32 AM
  6. xandermac's Avatar
    Retun on Investment. The big developers are in a "wait and see" mode for the PlayBook. Also, RIM won't make the NDK available until the fall and a lot of developers dont want to kludge together AIR or Flash apps, RIM dropped the ball on the NDK, it should have been available BEFORE the launch.

    It just boggles my mind that these companies wouldnt develop for the PB. Why not? Is it that hard? Is it that expensive to develop an app???
    05-25-11 06:42 AM
  7. xandermac's Avatar
    Android support on the PB is very limited. Only android 2.3 apps that DO NOT use native Android libraries are supported, that negates any game or app that uses graphic libraries, then the developer has to bother re-packaging/re-compiling their code and submitting it to RIM for approval. There aren't many 2.3 apps to begin with, ones that do not use native libraries are few and far between. It also means that NO Honeycomb 3.0 Tablet apps will work, period.

    Excellent point. Why write a PB app when you can wait and see how your existing Android app runs on the PB?
    Last edited by xandermac; 05-25-11 at 06:57 AM.
    05-25-11 06:45 AM
  8. Daniel Ratcliffe's Avatar
    However all the big companies as a result of this Android app player are going to think "Great, my app already works on the PB". If it doesn't, then hard lines. Ultimately, the Android app player is going to bite us in the backside.
    05-25-11 08:10 AM
  9. Kerms's Avatar
    No black balling going on.
    There's no NDK for one thing. Also developers don't want to waste resources. IMO RIM hasn't been known for their apps or apps store. Developers are going to take a wait and see approach.

    I think it was a bad idea for RIM to out of the gate jump on the Android bandwagon. If I was a developer that would make me wonder why the device couldn't stand on it's own. Even the Android stuff is going to be limited. One developer of an app that I would want has pretty much said they're taking a wait and see and didn't want to even fool with repackaging their android version of the app.

    RIM IMO should have had some decent in house apps developed at release and maybe even kicked a few software companies some money to developer their apps for the PB.

    I see a lot of potential for the PB but at this point it hasn't touched it.
    Last edited by Daps; 05-25-11 at 08:26 AM.
    05-25-11 08:24 AM
  10. TBone4eva's Avatar
    Avalanches start small and slow at first. I believe the android support was more a bone being thrown by RIM to small and medium developers so they could have more apps to get through the initial reluctance of people to buy the PB due to limited apps. The big dogs are going to develop apps using the NDK due to all the work that TAT is doing to leverage the full power of the PB. They are going to want to see significant sales though before they invest in developing apps, which goes back to why RIM is using as many different paths as possible to get apps in App World. We could also see companies initially simply port their current apps while they work on those NDK apps.
    05-25-11 08:40 AM
  11. s219's Avatar
    Chalk it up to a confusing, diluted development environment with no current path forward via a native SDK. RIM totally blew it as far as lining up the stars for developer support. And it's consistent with their developer efforts for earlier devices as well. They approached my company about writing mobile apps last year, and when we took a look at their developer tools, they were a mess compared to other platforms. It hasn't gotten any better with the PlayBook.

    Serious developers want a solid, stable, native SDK. Because we have to invest a great deal of time and resources making an app (which also means pulling time/resources away from other platforms that are already making us money) we want to make sure we're hitching our wagon to a solid technology path going forward. The Air and Android emulation options are a joke right now, and not deserving of our time/resources. We plan to evaluate the native SDK when it's available this fall, and go from there.

    I am shocked you'd suspect Apple or Google have a hand in this, considering that there are so many obvious problems on RIM's side -- they set themselves up for a train wreck from day one. Why would Apple and Google need to sabotage RIM when they do it to themselves?
    scorpiodsu likes this.
    05-25-11 08:46 AM
  12. Economist101's Avatar

    WHAT EVER THE REASON IS, it seems like an organized attempt to sabotage RIM's PB, and new OS.

    I just cant figure out the big question that dangles in my head that says "WHY NOT PUT YOUR APP OUT ASAP FOR THIS NEW COOL DEVICE?!"
    Remember that Apple didn't launch their "App Store" until a year after the iPhone launch (and about 9 months after the iPod Touch launch), with a year of sales behind them. Android didn't wait to launch the Android Market, but it really didn't grow until Verizon came on board and began pushing the Droid line (at which time Android begin to surge in the U.S.). When the PlayBook install base is large enough to support successful speculative apps, you'll see them. No one's being blackballed here.
    05-25-11 09:41 AM
  13. Dapper37's Avatar
    Didn't Apple say they will develop a rival to Netflix, they have the money and scope to be a huge compeditor to Netflix. When they decide to do something they wont stop. Why Netflix would play Russian roulet and gamble on not supporting what's sure to be a sucsessful platform???? Netflix is not the only company that is in danger of having Apple take their market share at a time of apples choosing. Its a big question for me?
    05-25-11 09:56 AM
  14. sportline's Avatar
    Easy to sort out
    Ios app store started 2007...current app qty?
    Android market started 2008...current app qty?
    Windows marketplace started .... Current app qty?
    Bb app world started ..... Current app qty?

    Fill up the blanks please
    05-25-11 10:30 AM
  15. Kronk's Avatar
    Didn't Apple say they will develop a rival to Netflix, they have the money and scope to be a huge compeditor to Netflix. When they decide to do something they wont stop. Why Netflix would play Russian roulet and gamble on not supporting what's sure to be a sucsessful platform???? Netflix is not the only company that is in danger of having Apple take their market share at a time of apples choosing. Its a big question for me?
    Until Apple makes a streaming video source that can be viewed on most phones, computers, and the big 3 gaming consoles, I doubt Netflix has anything to worry about.
    05-25-11 11:13 AM
  16. simsim's Avatar
    No black balling going on.
    There's no NDK for one thing. Also developers don't want to waste resources. IMO RIM hasn't been known for their apps or apps store. Developers are going to take a wait and see approach.

    I think it was a bad idea for RIM to out of the gate jump on the Android bandwagon. If I was a developer that would make me wonder why the device couldn't stand on it's own. Even the Android stuff is going to be limited. One developer of an app that I would want has pretty much said they're taking a wait and see and didn't want to even fool with repackaging their android version of the app.

    RIM IMO should have had some decent in house apps developed at release and maybe even kicked a few software companies some money to developer their apps for the PB.

    I see a lot of potential for the PB but at this point it hasn't touched it.
    A very reasonable argument.

    I have a PB, and it is perfect for me. I'm liking it more and more each day. But I have half a dozen BB friends who are asking me if I recommend they get it. Quite honestly, after learning how they would use it, and how important games and native PIM is to them (neither is to me), I'm advising them to wait-and-see.

    If I was an App developer I would do the same. I'm happy to throw my personal money at one, but business-wise it is not a thoroughbred yet. Still a promising foal.

    Ball's in RIM's court to come through on their promises and developers will jump in.

    No need for paranoid fears about the competition. It's all in RIM's hands alone.
    tstrike34 and Kerms like this.
    05-25-11 11:29 AM
  17. Nashstruck's Avatar
    ...can it be that big companies, like Skype and Netflix are holding out on purpose to raise the value of there apps?

    erm... YEAH! It's rly obvious... Microsoft owns Skype now.. a PB app will take AGES to come out... don't expect it anytime soon i reckon.
    05-25-11 11:35 AM
  18. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Remember that Apple didn't launch their "App Store" until a year after the iPhone launch (and about 9 months after the iPod Touch launch), with a year of sales behind them. Android didn't wait to launch the Android Market, but it really didn't grow until Verizon came on board and began pushing the Droid line (at which time Android begin to surge in the U.S.). When the PlayBook install base is large enough to support successful speculative apps, you'll see them. No one's being blackballed here.
    I tend to agree with this synopsis.
    05-25-11 11:37 AM
  19. scorpiodsu's Avatar
    It's RIM's fault. They have been poor with making the tools available to developers. And developers are not going to spend a lot of time and resources dealing with RIM while they are already making money on Android and iOS. RIM did this entire QNX thing out of order and we can't expect people just to drop what they are doing and jump on making QNX apps when it's not guaranteed it would be worth their while.... at least not at this point in time. And yes we all know how long it took for Apple's app store to get up but that was different. That was almost 4 years ago and then no one cared about apps so they could easily get away without having a lot available. It's different now. If you release something now, you better have the support backing it because that's what users expect now. In 2007, no one did. So please stop it with the "you remember how long it took apple...". That means nothing now because then expectations were low. It's not like that today.
    05-25-11 02:03 PM
  20. Economist101's Avatar
    It's RIM's fault. They have been poor with making the tools available to developers. And developers are not going to spend a lot of time and resources dealing with RIM while they are already making money on Android and iOS. RIM did this entire QNX thing out of order and we can't expect people just to drop what they are doing and jump on making QNX apps when it's not guaranteed it would be worth their while.... at least not at this point in time. And yes we all know how long it took for Apple's app store to get up but that was different. That was almost 4 years ago and then no one cared about apps so they could easily get away without having a lot available. It's different now. If you release something now, you better have the support backing it because that's what users expect now. In 2007, no one did. So please stop it with the "you remember how long it took apple...". That means nothing now because then expectations were low. It's not like that today.
    I don't disagree with most of this, but I wouldn't be so harsh towards RIM. In launching the PlayBook, RIM was in kind of a lose-lose situation: build around OS6 and get criticized for doing the same old thing, or break with the past and build a new, more powerful platform but get criticized for update speed and the absence of native apps. In light of this, I think most would agree they did the right thing, even if you have a legitimate beef with how things are progressing at this moment.
    Daniel Ratcliffe likes this.
    05-25-11 03:37 PM
  21. Daniel Ratcliffe's Avatar
    I don't disagree with most of this, but I wouldn't be so harsh towards RIM. In launching the PlayBook, RIM was in kind of a lose-lose situation: build around OS6 and get criticized for doing the same old thing, or break with the past and build a new, more powerful platform but get criticized for update speed and the absence of native apps. In light of this, I think most would agree they did the right thing, even if you have a legitimate beef with how things are progressing at this moment.
    Actually, RIM could have done a good job and released the NDK first, rather then the Flash and AIR and such. Therefore, I agree with his harshness. However my OTT and downright stupid opinion is that Jim and Mike should be the victims of 10 to the power of 9'999 nuclear bombs. But we know that'll never happen... In all seriousness though, if they wait until fall to release the NDK the PlayBook is toast.
    05-25-11 04:09 PM
  22. FF22's Avatar
    Actually, RIM could have done a good job and released the NDK first, ... In all seriousness though, if they wait until fall to release the NDK the PlayBook is toast.
    I have heard that they are pretty stubborn. So even if they are not locked in by development issues, they might still stick with a LATE release of the tools???
    05-25-11 05:38 PM
  23. Kerms's Avatar
    The iphone/ipad/android didn't have apps when it first came out isn't going to cut it, that was years ago and for alot of people especially when it looks like you don't have a clear direction they're not going to wait.

    iPad you could for the most part load the iphone apps although they aren't optimized, same with android apps for the most part but at least you have something to tide you over.

    I need/want more than an ebook/web browser.I need enterprise apps for me to justify a tablet. RDP,client emulations, VPN(I need PPTP as some sites I connect to use this setup), EAS and a few other things.

    Good hardware but RIM doesn't seem to have a clear vision. They should have had some in house apps ready at release. Showing and touting NFS an old game wasn't really doing them any favors. Now that TAT stuff looked good
    05-25-11 06:52 PM
  24. Kerms's Avatar
    It's RIM's fault. They have been poor with making the tools available to developers. And developers are not going to spend a lot of time and resources dealing with RIM while they are already making money on Android and iOS. RIM did this entire QNX thing out of order and we can't expect people just to drop what they are doing and jump on making QNX apps when it's not guaranteed it would be worth their while.... at least not at this point in time. And yes we all know how long it took for Apple's app store to get up but that was different. That was almost 4 years ago and then no one cared about apps so they could easily get away without having a lot available. It's different now. If you release something now, you better have the support backing it because that's what users expect now. In 2007, no one did. So please stop it with the "you remember how long it took apple...". That means nothing now because then expectations were low. It's not like that today.
    Dang I should have read your post before making my post. Pretty much how I feel. No one cares about years ago. It's about the here and now
    05-25-11 06:56 PM
  25. Kerms's Avatar
    Actually, RIM could have done a good job and released the NDK first, rather then the Flash and AIR and such. Therefore, I agree with his harshness. However my OTT and downright stupid opinion is that Jim and Mike should be the victims of 10 to the power of 9'999 nuclear bombs. But we know that'll never happen... In all seriousness though, if they wait until fall to release the NDK the PlayBook is toast.
    I won't say it's toast but they're really doing their users a disservice. iPad we already know they're going to have their apps, more honeycomb apps,windows and you'll have HP's WebOS

    I think the NDK should have been the push unlike see how simple it is with AIR/Flash or we're going to allow some Android apps. It should be native apps taking advantage of the hardware and getting developers excited instead they're like we'll see but not now
    05-25-11 07:03 PM
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