05-19-11 07:59 PM
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  1. SSaywell's Avatar
    On a releated note to apps being held up my Facebook app that I submited on April 19, when people started saying about no Facebook app on the PlayBook still hasn't been accepted where as another of my apps submited after then have been accepted and so have 3 updated.
    jonty12 likes this.
    05-16-11 10:27 AM
  2. pkcable's Avatar
    Just making a token appearance!
    05-16-11 10:41 AM
  3. Mojoski's Avatar
    What the heck is holding up the aMail deployment to App World? RIM is driving me NUTS on this one!! Has RIM given you any reason why it is taking so long? It's been weeks since you guys submitted it, hasn't it?

    We are still waiting for aMail approval.
    05-16-11 03:32 PM
  4. dkingsf's Avatar
    What the heck is holding up the aMail deployment to App World? RIM is driving me NUTS on this one!! Has RIM given you any reason why it is taking so long? It's been weeks since you guys submitted it, hasn't it?
    Well, as I've learned, you certainly don't want to raise questions or make known any suspicions you may have or you will be branded a conspiracy theorist.

    You must assume that RIM is doing EVERYTHING in your best interest.

    Just like Steve does for his Apple customers.
    05-16-11 06:17 PM
  5. TheScionicMan's Avatar
    Suspicions and questions not based on fact or logic don't equal a conclusion to me, although you've already come to one...

    I blame Xenu for the delay... There are too many wild thetans loose at RIM headquarters...
    05-16-11 06:33 PM
  6. dkingsf's Avatar
    Suspicions and questions not based on fact or logic don't equal a conclusion to me, although you've already come to one...

    I blame Xenu for the delay... There are too many wild thetans loose at RIM headquarters...
    Well, since SSaywells post at 11:27 today about his Facebook app now waiting approval for 4 weeks while others have been approved, including with some updates, I definitely am getting close to a conclusion. The facts are that there is no logic to this supposed process.

    I think I've read something about koolaid and tinfoil hats in other posts. Is the inside of your helmet also silver by any chance?
    Last edited by dkingsf; 05-16-11 at 07:40 PM.
    05-16-11 07:29 PM
  7. TheScionicMan's Avatar
    You act like the approval process is just a simple "yes it does", check the box. The more permissions the app requests, the more scrutiny it should get. A game that doesn't interact with any user data is a lot simpler to approve than something that wants access to your core info.

    If I'm wearing a tinfoil helmet, then you must be hunkered down in your Faraday cage, sending your posts out by courier...
    05-16-11 07:49 PM
  8. dkingsf's Avatar
    It appears that there are growing questions among the developer community. Good, that was my intent. As a user, I'm a bit peeved because quality apps are being delayed simply because RIM has an effort "due in the near future".
    But this is lost revenue to devs that can put together these elegant, functional and QUALITY apps in a timely manner. We all know it's hurry up and wait for whatever RIM is "soon to be" releasing.
    05-17-11 08:07 AM
  9. jetstreamblue's Avatar
    As part of the developers who went through the whole submission/approval rush during the free PlayBook offer, what was apparent to us was:
    1) The approval process was NOT first-in first-out. Some people got quick approvals, while others wait and waited. We couldn't find any pattern to this (not by app type, not by app complexity).
    2) When an app has issues, RIM was not immediately forthcoming in contacting the dev to notify them of the issue. Some devs got impatient, contacted RIM, and finally was told about some issue (perhaps minor) that held it up. They could have waited forever if they weren't proactive in contacting RIM.
    3) We never were too sure what exactly they tested. Some apps were approved with apparent bugs and issues. It seems that the most common reasons for rejection were improper signing or copyright/trademark issues (ex. including pics of the PlayBook itself).
    4) Wait times could be LONG. Some people waited 2 months for approval back in the day. I was hoping their approval times would have improved by now after the free offer rush, but it doesn't seem to be the case. A couple of weeks ago, I submitted a simple bug-fix update to one of my apps, and it still took over a week to approve. I just submitted a new app last night, we'll see how fast/slow it goes.

    Having said all of the above, I'd say any delay is probably just due to the poorly managed system at RIM. I'm sure they have a way of sorting and choosing which apps go first, but it's not something us devs have figured out.
    Mojoski likes this.
    05-17-11 08:37 AM
  10. dkingsf's Avatar
    As part of the developers who went through the whole submission/approval rush during the free PlayBook offer, what was apparent to us was:
    1) The approval process was NOT first-in first-out. Some people got quick approvals, while others wait and waited. We couldn't find any pattern to this (not by app type, not by app complexity).
    2) When an app has issues, RIM was not immediately forthcoming in contacting the dev to notify them of the issue. Some devs got impatient, contacted RIM, and finally was told about some issue (perhaps minor) that held it up. They could have waited forever if they weren't proactive in contacting RIM.
    3) We never were too sure what exactly they tested. Some apps were approved with apparent bugs and issues. It seems that the most common reasons for rejection were improper signing or copyright/trademark issues (ex. including pics of the PlayBook itself).
    4) Wait times could be LONG. Some people waited 2 months for approval back in the day. I was hoping their approval times would have improved by now after the free offer rush, but it doesn't seem to be the case. A couple of weeks ago, I submitted a simple bug-fix update to one of my apps, and it still took over a week to approve. I just submitted a new app last night, we'll see how fast/slow it goes.

    Having said all of the above, I'd say any delay is probably just due to the poorly managed system at RIM. I'm sure they have a way of sorting and choosing which apps go first, but it's not something us devs have figured out.
    Thanks for sharing your experience with the general user population. It's frustrating for us users and costly for you devs so RIM needs to get some resources on this issue to smooth and accelerate the process if they want to maximize the support of both groups.
    05-17-11 09:11 AM
  11. dkingsf's Avatar
    05-18-11 07:57 PM
  12. howarmat's Avatar
    That is pathetic. Really encouraging to devs
    05-18-11 08:24 PM
  13. dkingsf's Avatar
    Yes, but I personally don't think this is the bottom line. App approval being slow is one thing, but the types of apps that get approved quickly while others are being delayed just gives me pause to consider the motives from RIM.

    Especially since it appears that apps they left out for the playbook and are now maddeningly trying to catch up with, that other devs are trying to bring to market are being delayed. This is opportunity and revenue lost by the very developer community that RIM has been trying to woo into their camp.

    And since the apps in question (native email, video chat, facebook) will probably come as free upgrades to the Playbook, it's not like RIM is losing revenue, it's like they are trying to save face.
    05-19-11 07:28 AM
  14. TBacker's Avatar
    Sad.

    With RIM, it's not one big problem. It's the dozens of little ones that are holding them back. And many of them seem fairly easily correctable.

    I'm trying to be patient. I'm trying to keep my hopes up that PlayBook (and RIM in general) will grow up to be the awesome machine it can be. But the little nagging voice in my head keeps saying that they're to set in their ways and too disconnected from their user and developer base to dig themselves out.

    I can't help but to think they really need some fresh blood at the top - not to make it into AppleBerry, but to pull them out of the damn box a little bit and motivate them. They seem about as agile as the Titanic. Will they steer around the ice burg?

    (sighs...crosses fingers)
    Last edited by TBacker; 05-19-11 at 08:14 AM.
    05-19-11 08:06 AM
  15. trsbbs's Avatar
    I brought this up in a couple of threads a little while ago and got my a** handed to me by more then a few Devs.

    http://forums.crackberry.com/f222/pl...-stuff-609759/

    Maybe they see what I was seeing then, maybe they don't. But it is so clear
    that certain apps are being let out while others are not.

    Those that took the time to write a more complex, time consuming and complicated
    application, like aMail, seem to be loosing out.

    Why?

    I see only two answers to this.

    RIMs approval process is ran by Bugs Bunny
    RIMs approval process is bias and not allowing out apps that could cut into their turf.

    I like my PB, but RIM is pissing me off with this.

    The Devs need to see this as well and put pressure on RIM to play fair
    as RIM still doesn't seem to respond to what the customer wants.

    It would be good for the Devs and the customer.

    Tim
    Last edited by trsbbs; 05-19-11 at 08:47 AM.
    05-19-11 08:43 AM
  16. dkingsf's Avatar
    I brought this up in a couple of threads a little while ago and got my a** handed to me by more then a few Devs.

    http://forums.crackberry.com/f222/pl...-stuff-609759/

    Maybe they see what I was seeing then, maybe they don't. But it is so clear
    that certain apps are being let out while others are not.

    Those that took the time to write a more complex, time consuming and complicated
    application, like aMail, seem to be loosing out.

    Why?

    I see only two answers to this.

    RIMs approval process is ran by Bugs Bunny
    RIMs approval process is bias and not allowing out apps that could cut into their turf.

    I like my PB, but RIM is pissing me off with this.

    The Devs need to see this as well and put pressure on RIM to play fair
    as RIM still doesn't seem to respond to what the customer wants.

    It would be good for the Devs and the customer.

    Tim
    Yeah, as you can see from this thread, there are people that are not happy with me for questioning this. I'm not even a developer, but if I was and I was losing out I'd be even more po'd.

    I really just want the process to be fair. It seems on the one hand RIM is courting devs to jump on board, then s..cre.wing them with delays to their efforts if it impinges on something they want to get out first.

    I'm starting to refer to it as the "Blackberry Jam".
    Last edited by dkingsf; 05-19-11 at 09:47 AM.
    05-19-11 09:41 AM
  17. fnguyen's Avatar
    As much as i like my PlayBook i do think it must be pretty embarrassing for RIM that they could only release a device 3/4 (4/5 at the most) finished, so it doesnt supprise me they would hold this app up.
    I heard the PlayBook is selling well so maybe they see that as vindication that their half arsed approach is acceptable.

    On the other hand the app selection is pretty poor so you'd think they would get it straight out....but who knows...this is RIM after all, their company motto should be: 'Succeeding inspite of ourselves!'

    Damn my addiction to these things
    i d rather have a 3/4 Os than ihardware that is i/2 finished, just saying.
    05-19-11 01:26 PM
  18. AiFlex's Avatar
    Just as a heads up we will be releasing an aMail .bar by Sunday this weekend so everyone can get their hands on a 'pre release' of aMail. We are working with blackberry to get aMail released asap.
    05-19-11 06:51 PM
  19. Skeevecr's Avatar
    Those that took the time to write a more complex, time consuming and complicated
    application, like aMail, seem to be loosing out.

    Why?

    I see only two answers to this.

    RIMs approval process is ran by Bugs Bunny
    RIMs approval process is bias and not allowing out apps that could cut into their turf.
    Have you not considered the obvious and far simpler reason that more complex and complicated applications will also have a more complex and complicated approval process?

    These whole tinfoil hat conspiracy nut posts are just laughable, the existence of 3rd party apps make the playbook more appealing and rim make more money from both hw and software sales.

    Assuming that once the native apps are released for free they become the most popular option for most people, it would actually make more sense to rush these apps through the approval process to get their cut while they can.
    05-19-11 07:06 PM
  20. dkingsf's Avatar
    Have you not considered the obvious and far simpler reason that more complex and complicated applications will also have a more complex and complicated approval process?

    These whole tinfoil hat conspiracy nut posts are just laughable, the existence of 3rd party apps make the playbook more appealing and rim make more money from both hw and software sales.

    Assuming that once the native apps are released for free they become the most popular option for most people, it would actually make more sense to rush these apps through the approval process to get their cut while they can.
    you talk of tinfoil hats. All I can say is ... how was the koolaid? RIM loves naivete.
    05-19-11 07:52 PM
  21. dkingsf's Avatar
    Just as a heads up we will be releasing an aMail .bar by Sunday this weekend so everyone can get their hands on a 'pre release' of aMail. We are working with blackberry to get aMail released asap.
    aFlex, GLAD to hear this. Maybe RIM has paid attention to the negative bent for your app and hopefully others.

    Now, I hope they just screw up instead of screwing with their devs.

    Well, cmon, we know they will, right?
    05-19-11 07:59 PM
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