1. vingilot's Avatar
    Very interested in starting to make some apps, have java experience and was wondering what route I should take. I've installed the Android plugs in eclipse and though I'd give a shot at android apps, maybe port to playbook as well? Is it likely my apps could be ported and work on the pb or should I develop natively? If i wanted to design bb phone apps, what is the best way to get started? I know they use java, thanks guys!
    03-28-12 07:05 PM
  2. cavemen's Avatar
    Very interested in starting to make some apps, have java experience and was wondering what route I should take. I've installed the Android plugs in eclipse and though I'd give a shot at android apps, maybe port to playbook as well? Is it likely my apps could be ported and work on the pb or should I develop natively? If i wanted to design bb phone apps, what is the best way to get started? I know they use java, thanks guys!
    Check this similar post....
    http://forums.crackberry.com/playboo...ations-712515/
    03-28-12 08:37 PM
  3. vingilot's Avatar
    thanks, so is java not really a good choice?
    03-28-12 09:35 PM
  4. BuzzStarField's Avatar
    thanks, so is java not really a good choice?
    I am a Java programmer. In the beginning I was disapointed that RIM was supporting AIR development. But ActonScript was easy to learn for a Java programmer and things have worked out okay. AS3 still has a bit of mickey-mouse feel to it though and I would prefer a JVM on PlayBook but it is not going to happen.

    If you plan on entering the Android Market as your main target but wish to support PlayBook, this would be the only real reason for sticking with Java. RIM's conversion tools are easy to use but you should be aware that PB users seem to prefer "native" apps over ones that run in the Android player.

    If you are developing high performance games then NDK is the way to go. But until Cascades is ready, not so much for other apps. I have dabbled in c++ but have found the lack of standard libraries difficult to fathom. I have built an ANE for my AIR app that is still in testing but that is about as involved in the NDK as I want to get - although circumstances may change if I find I need to re-write my AIR app to get better performance.
    app_Developer and peter9477 like this.
    03-28-12 11:11 PM
  5. app_Developer's Avatar
    I am a Java programmer. In the beginning I was disapointed that RIM was supporting AIR development. But ActonScript was easy to learn for a Java programmer and things have worked out okay. AS3 still has a bit of mickey-mouse feel to it though and I would prefer a JVM on PlayBook but it is not going to happen.

    If you plan on entering the Android Market as your main target but wish to support PlayBook, this would be the only real reason for sticking with Java. RIM's conversion tools are easy to use but you should be aware that PB users seem to prefer "native" apps over ones that run in the Android player.

    If you are developing high performance games then NDK is the way to go. But until Cascades is ready, not so much for other apps. I have dabbled in c++ but have found the lack of standard libraries difficult to fathom. I have built an ANE for my AIR app that is still in testing but that is about as involved in the NDK as I want to get - although circumstances may change if I find I need to re-write my AIR app to get better performance.
    Pretty awesome summary of the current situation.

    I would add one thing from what we see hiring Java developers. Hiring a Java developer to build Android apps is a bit like hiring a French speaker to sell real estate in Paris.

    The French is a prerequisite certainly, but you also have to know something about real estate in Paris. From what I've seen in other developers, it takes most people a fair amount of time to really become familiar with a good working range of the Android APIs. There is a lot to Android, and much of it is sort of poorly documented (which means lots of trial and error to find the patterns that work for you).

    So that's a big investment. Of course, Android experience is also a valuable skill right now, so may well be worth the time.

    (I'm one of those, though, that is not impressed with the performance of Android apps on Playbook. I think it's actually quite poor. So my interest is in native apps in C++ which happens to be a language I have a lot of experience with.)
    03-28-12 11:24 PM
  6. StikiGreenZ's Avatar
    If you want to go cross-platform, I would suggest going the HTML5 / Webworks route.
    03-28-12 11:38 PM
  7. BuzzStarField's Avatar
    If you want to go cross-platform, I would suggest going the HTML5 / Webworks route.
    As I understood it, the OP is trying to leverage his background in java development.

    I would have mentioned this option but for a Java programmer who revels in the world of object oriented design and programming, HTML5/Webworks/Actionscript extensions is a poor substitute for a "real" programming environment.

    Signed: a Java snob.
    Last edited by BuzzStarField; 03-30-12 at 07:53 AM.
    03-28-12 11:51 PM
  8. app_Developer's Avatar
    Signed: a Java snob.
    Cosigned.

    Writing a real app in HTML5 still feels like writing a paper with crayons, or cooking a meal with nothing but disposable plastic knives.

    It's fine for very, very simple apps. We call those websites.
    Last edited by app_Developer; 03-28-12 at 11:59 PM.
    03-28-12 11:56 PM
  9. polytope's Avatar
    I am not sure if Cascades is coming to WebWorks as well. In case it's not, your best bet is to learn the NDK. It gives you the ultimate performance and flexibility though, in its current form, is rather hard to do anything sophisticated in the GUI unless you use the Qt port.
    03-29-12 06:01 AM
  10. aikmanr's Avatar
    Cosigned.

    Writing a real app in HTML5 still feels like writing a paper with crayons, or cooking a meal with nothing but disposable plastic knives.

    It's fine for very, very simple apps. We call those websites.
    LOL! Perfect analogies. I agree 100%. I've given WebWorks a full go and was disappointed with the results. The performance of HTML5 pales in comparison to native apps.

    To the OP: I highly suggest learning AS3 and going that route. Cavemen linked the thread above where I explain my position on it.
    03-29-12 11:10 AM
  11. cavemen's Avatar
    I wish there could be a simple interface to develop games instead of writing tons of codes...
    harist3a likes this.
    03-29-12 08:26 PM
  12. vingilot's Avatar
    Thanks guys, so it sounds like either as3 or native sdk would be the way to go, which seems more advantageous in the long run,in terms of giving valuable experience which could be applicable elsewhere too
    Last edited by vingilot; 03-30-12 at 07:37 AM.
    03-30-12 07:34 AM
  13. BuzzStarField's Avatar
    Thanks guys, so it sounds like either as3 or native sdk would be the way to go, which seems more advantageous in the long run,in terms of giving valuable experience which could be applicable elsewhere too
    NDK is the way of the future. Although as a Java programmer, I think that you will get a quicker start with pure AS3 (forget about Flex.)

    Here is my own migration plan (since I am already "stuck" with AS3):

    1. Gradually optimize my AIR app by offloading number-crunching, IO, hardware services, etc to ANEs. Use the exercise to become fully competent using the NDK while at the same time, building a library of reusable native modules.
    2. When Cascades arrives and NDK matures, replace AIR front-end with c++;
    peter9477 likes this.
    03-30-12 08:09 AM
  14. vingilot's Avatar
    Great thanks, on a completely unrelated note, updated my bridge for 99 today and bluetooth won't find the pb. Anyone heard about any problems? I know I should dedicate a thread but while I'm here
    03-30-12 11:37 AM
  15. peter9477's Avatar
    vingilot, you should definitely start a new thread...
    BuzzStarField likes this.
    03-30-12 01:28 PM
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