1. Matt J's Avatar
    I was thinking.... on my Windows 7 PC, I have Microsoft Office, a whole bunch of utilities to do stuff like burn CDs, some useless preloaded stuff, the odd application that is useful (like AutoCAD and Adobe), and my Firefox 5 browser. I don't play games. I am perfectly content with this setup.

    However....when it comes to tablets and smartphones, the world just *must have* 400,000 apps. Why is this? I find that I have only installed a dozen or so apps that can actually be done through a browser... but... whatever...

    How did this app paradigm come about when PC and Mac users were perfectly content with a dozen or so useful apps? I find that with my PlayBook, the browser icon is the most used because all my "apps" are on the web.
    08-03-11 04:15 PM
  2. Fubaz's Avatar
    there are millions of useless apps for pc and mac. but since they are not in a common marketplace or talked about as much as smartphone apps are (mainly made popular by apple and crapstore) they are not in the spotlight.
    08-03-11 04:18 PM
  3. aawilson's Avatar
    The apparent need for so many apps, as I've come to understand it, is mostly on devices with lesser browsers. Most Blackberry users, I'd venture to say as I've read and talked with them in person, are not screaming for more apps. I know its such an old cliche but its true; iDevices cannot load flash. So they created an appstore to try and expand the capabilities of the device. Most Apple and I would say a fair number of Android ones, are just snippets of websites. It's mostly been a completely different market for computers, the software development game is a tricky one, if I was Microsoft, of course I'd want my IE installed on every Windows machine, but what is to stop HP from including another pre loaded browser?

    Since before launch, Mike L has been saying with the dawn of the Playbook comes a new kind of computing, he wants to bring the level of mobile technology up to the standards of a computer, not "dumb it down" which I take to mean, 50 million useless apps. Its kind of a brand new idea (thanks to Flashless Jobs) to have a mobile device with so few apps available, but no device I've tried can load as many pages as the Playbook, besides, you got it, a computer!
    08-03-11 04:37 PM
  4. Matt J's Avatar
    Its kind of a brand new idea (thanks to Flashless Jobs) to have a mobile device with so few apps available, but no device I've tried can load as many pages as the Playbook, besides, you got it, a computer!
    I'm beginning to see this. I hardly go to BlackBerry App World anymore because.... well.... I don't need to. I remember when I got my PlayBook, I was furious that there was no SugarSync app... but then I realised that... well... the SugarSync website was just fine.

    This whole "app paradigm" is a "stop gap" measure that evolved around the inability of certain platforms to run the full web. It's comical now... I get it.
    OniBerry likes this.
    08-03-11 04:44 PM
  5. s219's Avatar
    I was thinking.... on my Windows 7 PC, I have Microsoft Office, a whole bunch of utilities to do stuff like burn CDs, some useless preloaded stuff, the odd application that is useful (like AutoCAD and Adobe), and my Firefox 5 browser. I don't play games. I am perfectly content with this setup.

    However....when it comes to tablets and smartphones, the world just *must have* 400,000 apps. Why is this? I find that I have only installed a dozen or so apps that can actually be done through a browser... but... whatever...

    How did this app paradigm come about when PC and Mac users were perfectly content with a dozen or so useful apps? I find that with my PlayBook, the browser icon is the most used because all my "apps" are on the web.

    I don't plan to enter the main argument here, but I want to point out that there is a big difference between a desktop/laptop and a device like a smartphone (which drove the app revolution). Among other things, the smartphone fits in your pocket, it contains cameras for photography and videos, it contains sensor hardware like a compass, gyro, GPS, and accelerometer, it ostensibly has constant internet access, and it contains a touch screen. That combination of portability, combined with software that takes advantage of the unique hardware capabilities, put smartphones in a different category to me.

    Take an example. I can buy a smartphone app that turns the device into a vehicle performance computer, capable of measuring acceleration timing on a drag strip. It is accurate enough to replace a $200 dedicated performance device. To me that is a compelling app. That's also something you'd never use a traditional PC for.

    Then consider an app like a barcode scanner, which has all sorts of cool uses in the real world, ranging from shopping to actual productivity uses at work. Again it can replace a dedicated device, and it's not something you'd use a traditional PC for.

    Then there are photography apps, which are extremely popular. These do everything from auto-level photos in real time, to special effects, to watermark and geo-stamp photos. This is stuff even dedicated cameras don't do, much less PCs or Macs.

    There are thousands of other examples like this, where the portability and hardware/software capabilities of a smartphone let you do things that never were possible/feasible with a PC, and the apps themselves start replacing other types of dedicated hardware. Just following that line of thought, I can see how people could easily want/have/use more apps on their smartphone device than on the PC.

    By the way, I am a poor example for either one of our arguments, since I have 76 apps on my desktop Mac, and only about 20 on my iPhone.
    aawilson likes this.
    08-03-11 05:23 PM
  6. aawilson's Avatar
    dfg912, you are right. I think everybody wants more useful apps.
    08-03-11 05:31 PM
  7. Economist101's Avatar
    The apparent need for so many apps, as I've come to understand it, is mostly on devices with lesser browsers.
    Whereby "lesser" I assume you mean "no Flash support." You do realize that includes every single BlackBerry phone ever released and/or sold (including those announced today).

    I know its such an old cliche but its true; iDevices cannot load flash. So they created an appstore to try and expand the capabilities of the device.
    No, they created an App Store because neither developers nor consumers embraced web apps. If the App Store had been about the absence of Flash, Apple wouldn't have spent a year trying to ram web apps down developer throats.

    Most Apple and I would say a fair number of Android ones, are just snippets of websites.
    There's also an awful lot on iOS that can't be done in a browser. X-Plane comes to mind. This fact weakens your argument, though I'm sure you had perfectly legitimate reasons for ignoring it.

    Also, let's not pretend that Flash capability brings every single bit of internet content to users. Trying loading Netflix or Hulu streaming on your PlayBook (FYI: we're 100+ days post-launch and still no PlayBook app even announced).

    Since before launch, Mike L has been saying with the dawn of the Playbook comes a new kind of computing, he wants to bring the level of mobile technology up to the standards of a computer, not "dumb it down" which I take to mean, 50 million useless apps.
    You need a history lesson. Microsoft tried the full-featured tablet computer nearly 10 years ago. Consumers ignored it. As for the PlayBook, empirical evidence suggests consumers haven't embraced it either. Meanwhile, Apple is selling more Flash-less iPads per week than the PlayBook "shipped" in its first 6 weeks.

    Its kind of a brand new idea (thanks to Flashless Jobs) to have a mobile device with so few apps available, but no device I've tried can load as many pages as the Playbook, besides, you got it, a computer!
    And yet, if we compare content availability (purchased content, Netflix streaming mentioned above, etc), the tide turns a bit. Most amazingly, the iPad can communicate directly with Exchange servers while the PlayBook cannot, and with the announced iOS support in BES, it's entirely possible that iPad users will be able to connect to BES before PlayBook users will.
    08-03-11 05:44 PM
  8. PanaSama's Avatar
    Here is a list of "apps" that i constantly use in my PC:

    Microsoft Office (Excel, Power Point, Word, One Note, Outlook, thats 5 apps right there)
    Skype
    Dropbox
    Kindle
    Nook
    Teamviewer
    VlC
    Daemon Tools
    Jdownloader
    Vuze
    Guitar Pro 6
    Mediaplayer classic
    Nero burning rom
    Windows Media player
    Adobe Phoshop Essentials
    Adobe PDF Reader
    Mkv2Mov
    ACDSEE Pro
    Cdisplay
    TightVNC
    WinRar
    iTunes
    Calibre
    Windows Live Messenger
    ArtRage

    Thats more than 25 "apps" without counting games wich are quite many btw, oh and for web browsers i have three: Firefox, Chrome and IE9.

    Im not saying that i need the millions of software available for PC, and im sure no one is saying that they need thousands of apps for their tablets neither, just the ones that are useful to me, and right now almost none of them are available for the PB, many of the apps i want cant be done in a web browser or they function very poorly, and im not asking for impossibles either, all of the apps i want are available for other tablets.

    Frankly im not sure why are we even discussing this, hardware without software is useless, apps ARE important to the majority of people, the fact that you are implying that software is useless on a PC is laughable to say the least, maybe you dont use that many software but you are in the minority, we often mock the Apple crowd by calling them iSheep, but i fear when i read threads like this that the Blackberry nation is becoming something worse, the level of fanboyism is rising a lot in these forums, are we so blind that we should be contempt with the lack of features in our devices? what kind of fanboys are we becoming that we feel the need to give logical explantions for the deficiencies of our gadgets?, the "we dont have it because we dont need it" attitude is sickening, we should be demanding, voicing our concerns and asking for the features that we want to see on our blackberries, its almost like if we have lost all faith that RIM can do this, so we fool ourselves in to thinking that everything is fine and that we dont need anything else.
    08-03-11 06:39 PM
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