1. ev44's Avatar
    Hey,

    I want to make apps for the playbook, and eventually maybe porting phones, any recommendations on where is the best place to start?

    Should I just take a book out and read a book like "apps for dummies?" or....

    How much would previous programming skills help?

    thx
    10-07-11 01:58 PM
  2. BuzzStarField's Avatar
    Hey,

    I want to make apps for the playbook, and eventually maybe porting phones, any recommendations on where is the best place to start?

    Should I just take a book out and read a book like "apps for dummies?" or....

    How much would previous programming skills help?

    thx
    You need to be skilled in HTML/JavaScript to write WebWorks apps or you need to be a competent Adobe's ActionScript3 programmer to develop for the AIR SDK. If you want use the NDK then you need to know c/c++. If you want to develop for current BB phones you need to know Java.

    The best developers have a really good background in general software engineering with an emphasis on object oriented design. If you are a self-starter you can take a book out as you suggest. Also remember that Google is your friend - there is lots of information available on the web - search for tutorials in your chosen programming language. Or you can take university or college-level courses.

    When you have a firm grounding in the basics, you can go to the RIM website to learn how to apply your generalized skills to BlackBerry platforms. For example visit here to obtain information about. Tablet OS for Air Sdk. RIM maintains support forums for it various development environments - Here is the one dedicated to the AIR SDK.
    Last edited by BuzzStarField; 10-08-11 at 08:39 AM.
    KermEd likes this.
    10-07-11 02:55 PM
  3. KermEd's Avatar
    I use all of the above, but first pick your target audience and stick with the most comfortable tool in that category . The native sdk is fairly unstable and I tried porting a few apps through it but it should have the best bang for your buck when things work.

    Adobe Flash Builder has the best documentation (but leaves much to be desired). For example good luck with the stylesheet additions in the QNX browser. I miss the days when every function had a simple example. And I think you will be surprised at its limitations if you try any particle systems. You may get more milage out of flex over AS3mobile in the long run but AS3 feels a lot closer to C than ever before and if you have a choice between the two, you should probably learn c/c++. Cuz Adobes future is still questionable with html5 coming.

    The webtoolkit looks interesting. I havent delved much into it because its in a nice-to-use for simplified web ports bucket on my desktop (i dunno if its true or not but just my interpretation).

    But as with any SDK - sign up on the developers front page and get all the documents you need. And just start learning. Stick to one language until you can program in it without thinking. Then its just a matter of learning the 'other guys' terms for the same thing when you switch languages (good milage via google).

    Cheers.
    10-08-11 06:19 AM
  4. TheMarco's Avatar
    If you're going for WebWorks have a look at my free Unit Converter app. It's open source so it can be used to learn some basics.

    The app is here in AppWorld

    And the source code is here on GitHub.
    10-08-11 10:58 AM
  5. louzer's Avatar
    The jury is still out at this point.

    Flash (Flashbuilder, Flex, or just Eclipse with the Air SDK plugin) is easy if you have any Flash/AS3 experience. Also, Flashbuilder 4.5 allows for write once/deploy many which means that as long as you stick to the generic Flash/Flex libraries and don't rely on any device specific functionality, your app can be compiled to TabletOS, Android, and iOS. This is great for maximum exposure, but you lose the ability to make your app look and feel as if it's writen specificallly for the platform you deployed on. If you decide to use the TabletOS SDK, you can leverage some native functionality.

    WebWorks SDK is easy if you are familiar with HTML 5, Javascript, and CSS. It is easier to create apps for the Playbook and port them to the BB phones. But it's the furthest away of the three to the native level. This means that there is less 'native' functionality that you have access to via the SDK.

    The native SDK will provide you with the closest integration between your app and the OS. These apps will run faster and more efficiently. They also require more experience to code, but will provide the best bang for the buck in terms of performance and appearance since they will integrate much more easiy with the OS. Apps developed for the native SDK will onlly run on RIM devices and you'll need to port between BBX and BBOS.

    I've done most of my work so far with Flash and have been fairly happy with it. Then again, I haven't made apps that would be able to be hooked into any native functionality (like BBM, etc) nor will I be able to with this current toolset.

    For web content, the WebWorks SDK is probably the best and easiest solution. For standalone games or apps that require some connectivity to a 3rd party site but mostly run standalone on the device, the Flash SDK would suffice. For killer apps that appear as if they're tightly integrated into the OS, you should go with the native SDK.
    10-08-11 12:08 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD