1. Just Me's Avatar
    Wow. There have been so many PB apps (games) launched in the past week, I am struggling to keep up. The question I am contemplating is the actual relevance of the Android player. The ease of porting and the multiple developer tools available may have essentially rendered this highly anticipated tool useless. Is the Android player DOA?

    Any app worth its salt will be on the BlackBerry PB within weeks and BBX after that.
    Last edited by Just Me; 10-21-11 at 02:05 PM.
    10-21-11 01:50 PM
  2. KermEd's Avatar
    It won't be DOA Right now its a great way to side-load a ton of apps you can't get. And questionable other things.

    I invision in the future that the NDK will bring console games to the PlayBook, and people who have been programming in AIR can just convert their apps over instead of re-writing them.

    From a developer perspective - less work means faster turnover. And faster turnover means more apps In its current form the Android Player is better designed for developers to use than end-users.
    10-21-11 02:34 PM
  3. Just Me's Avatar
    It won't be DOA Right now its a great way to side-load a ton of apps you can't get. And questionable other things.

    I invision in the future that the NDK will bring console games to the PlayBook, and people who have been programming in AIR can just convert their apps over instead of re-writing them.

    From a developer perspective - less work means faster turnover. And faster turnover means more apps In its current form the Android Player is better designed for developers to use than end-users.
    Interesting. Do you think it could a bait and switch tactic designed to get more native app development for BBX? Sideloading "questionable other things" sounds a little outside of RIM security centric mantra.
    10-21-11 03:07 PM
  4. BuzzStarField's Avatar
    It won't be DOA Right now its a great way to side-load a ton of apps you can't get. And questionable other things.

    I invision in the future that the NDK will bring console games to the PlayBook, and people who have been programming in AIR can just convert their apps over instead of re-writing them.

    From a developer perspective - less work means faster turnover. And faster turnover means more apps In its current form the Android Player is better designed for developers to use than end-users.
    Agreed - we will get lots of Android apps converted for use on the PlayBook. This conversion is just a simple repackaging exercise - no actual code is converted in the process But apps written for AIR will never be converted to native c++ apps without the need to re-write the AS3 code from the ground up. An AIR app's architecture would have to be redesigned because the AIR event and thread models is so different between the two languages. AIR apps are not multi-threaded so AS3 programmers have to use all sorts of workarounds to achieve peak performance. The app would have be structured in an utterly different manner when ported to c++ and no automated converter would be up to the task.
    KermEd likes this.
    10-21-11 03:25 PM
  5. KermEd's Avatar
    Interesting. Do you think it could a bait and switch tactic designed to get more native app development for BBX? Sideloading "questionable other things" sounds a little outside of RIM security centric mantra.
    The questionable builds will (inevitably) work itself out. But right now I've sideloaded some things from Android that I really shouldn't be able to sideload because of the signing process changes. This is really a risk for Android developers. But the problem here is that Android developers have always been at risk because of the nature of APK's. So really, its just extending the freedom of sideloading paid applications on Android to BB. No new risk to developers, just a new version of it.

    But with all of that said - the native app development is phenomenal. To put it in perspective, I own one Tablet for each family right now. And I can tell you that the native apps coming into PlayBook are closer to console quality. And make some of the most well polished WebOS, Android and iOS apps look like games for phones.

    The native SDK has some major potential. And I think once a stable native SDK is in the hands of the developers - it will really sky rocket. I hesitate to use the beta NDK they have right now because it 'fails' on OS2.

    But look at it this way, anyone with an Android app can now have a chance to repack for BBX/QNX with minimal effort. And anyone with C++ based apps, can have a chance to repack for BBX/QNX with less effort. Meaning the chances of you seeing your favorite PocketSNES emu or other open-source C++ designed OpenGL ES application coming to your finger tips is increasing every day

    The potential is there. And thats what developers have been waiting / asking for. AIR and AS3 is a good language. But its not structured very well for extremely large game developments and 3D work. Which really limits its potential.

    i.e. you would probably never see Minecraft in AIR or AS3 - because all the 3d commands need to be made from scratch, and the way Adobe works it would get laggy very quickly. It would be a monumentous task. But in C++ on a NDK - I wouldn't be surprised if someone doesnt have a working demo quickly. Edit: There are some AIR experts who could probably create a Minecraft clone, but it would be a monumentous task.
    10-21-11 03:33 PM
  6. BuzzStarField's Avatar
    Interesting. Do you think it could a bait and switch tactic designed to get more native app development for BBX? Sideloading "questionable other things" sounds a little outside of RIM security centric mantra.
    There is no bait and switch. And I don't think that RIM (or native developers) are concerned by sideloading no matter how questionable. If you want to put junk on your device, it's entirely up to you to deal with security issues.

    Corporations could stop people from mucking up company-owned PBs by blocking Development mode on the device. Without Development mode, sideloading is not possible. It was also announced that BBX will allow corporations to have what amounts to a private App World where only authorized apps can be loaded.
    10-21-11 03:37 PM
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