1. Wangta's Avatar
    So I'm thrilled that V2.0 will allow us to use a majority of Android apps, but does anybody see this as a BAD strategic decision on RIM's part?

    As a developer, why would I want to create a native BB Playbook application if I can kill two birds with one stone by creating an Android application that gets both the Android/Playbook market?

    I would almost view this as Playbook/RIM selling out - admitting they aren't able to attract developers to the platform.
    Last edited by Wangta; 10-20-11 at 06:56 PM.
    10-20-11 06:54 PM
  2. FF22's Avatar
    there are some threads on this issue.
    two way street.
    10-20-11 07:00 PM
  3. kill_9's Avatar
    This is a real danger that Research In Motion has opened itself to face in the coming months and possibly years. The ability to run Android applications is a boon for some users and maybe developers too, but the BlackBerry PlayBook needs native applications too and the ability to use the BlackBerry smartphone keyboards via Bluetooth.
    lwaysluking likes this.
    10-20-11 07:02 PM
  4. Chaplain_Clancy's Avatar
    So I'm thrilled that V2.0 will allow us to use a majority of Android apps, but does anybody see this as a BAD strategic decision on RIM's part?

    As a developer, why would I want to create a native BB Playbook application if I can kill two birds with one stone by creating an Android application that gets both the Android/Playbook market?

    I would almost view this as Playbook/RIM selling out - admitting they aren't able to attract developers to the platform.
    I see your point, but what's our complaint here? That they aren't throwing up their hands and saying, we can't compete with Apple, sorry guys no more support for the Playbook, or have them saying apparently apps are really important in terms of sales, we're going to resolve this by giving you access to android apps as well, giving you far more options than our Apple counterpart.

    They aren't able to attract developers to the platform. Why go where there are no sales? I say well done RIM for doing something about it rather than jumping ship HP style.
    10-20-11 07:02 PM
  5. Mastajeet's Avatar
    This is called double betting. A counter strategy against technology risk.
    They are bidding at the same time on android and BB(x?)
    whoever wins rim wins.

    Just like microsoft with windaube and os/2 (loll os2)
    10-20-11 07:10 PM
  6. notfanboy's Avatar
    This is a brilliant move by RIM, and an impressive technical achievement to boot.

    The problem when you introduce a new OS like QNX is that there aren't any apps written for it. Without any apps, users are turned off. And without any users, it's not worth it for developers to write apps. RIM found an innovative, bold way to break out of that Kobayashi Maru problem by introducing the Android player. Instantly they can claim to have thousands of apps when they market the BBX devices.

    The jury is still out on whether this would be enough.
    10-20-11 07:18 PM
  7. rickgainsmith's Avatar
    I've been swaying as to whether its a good decision or not.

    Keeping it simple, lets face it, the average consumer is swayed by simple things, e.g.

    How many apps?
    Can I check my email?

    Really simple basic things sway consumers, having a selling point of,

    Yes Mr Smith, you can have the best of two eco systems with the PlayBook, not only the revolutionary BBX (QNX), but also Android apps. Why settle for just one ecosystem?

    Native Email + Android Apps = Sales!
    jtvoxboi and lwaysluking like this.
    10-20-11 07:24 PM
  8. anthogag's Avatar
    Maybe RIM's strategy, for now as investors are so fickle, is to provide the core high quality integrated native apps (Ex. BB messenger, maps, travel, protect, movies, music, etc..) that we mostly use and let Android fill the need for the publics hunger for candy.

    I can see narrow-minded android customers suddenly realizing they can have android AND BlackBerry if they buy a Blackberry product because as a device the Playbook is the best.

    RIM just has to make sure their apps are better than Android.
    10-20-11 07:33 PM
  9. 123berryaddicted's Avatar
    To add to all this. QNX (native tablet Os) is easy to program for (unlike bbos), we will see tones of apps become available as native apps for pb...

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    10-20-11 07:40 PM
  10. Wangta's Avatar
    To add to all this. QNX (native tablet Os) is easy to program for (unlike bbos), we will see tones of apps become available as native apps for pb...

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Good points guys. I hadn't thought of all of these perspectives.

    I wasn't aware QNX is that easy to program for - is that true? So on that theory, when BBs go QNX, there should be more apps for that as well?

    Curious why BB OS is so hard to program for?
    10-20-11 07:45 PM
  11. jtvoxboi's Avatar
    I've been swaying as to whether its a good decision or not.

    Keeping it simple, lets face it, the average consumer is swayed by simple things, e.g.

    How many apps?
    Can I check my email?

    Really simple basic things sway consumers, having a selling point of,

    Yes Mr Smith, you can have the best of two eco systems with the PlayBook, not only the revolutionary BBX (QNX), but also Android apps. Why settle for just one ecosystem?

    Native Email + Android Apps = Sales!
    Great point, where this could get interesting is when the corporate RIM rep has the hands on demo showing off the security and pro abilities of the BB and PB, and the retailers can (if they wake up and get educated) promote the over-the-top fun multimedia, game, native abilities of both to a potential future fanboy consumer. Again, like no other tablet, the PB is truly poised to become both shortly.
    lwaysluking likes this.
    10-20-11 08:03 PM
  12. mypb16's Avatar
    It does look bad for RIM or any other company to use their competition to help themselves.

    But......

    I think its a very smart move by RIM. Lets face it, we all know that the Playbook and its new QNX OS is awesome, but it came out in a market controlled and dominated by Apple and Android. Those 2 systems are very well in place and growing. Bringing a whole new OS system like WebOS or QNX must be very tough on a company. Not only your product must have something that the other 2 don't in order to compete, but you depend on a lot of people (developers) moving your product.
    Long story short is it does not happen over night and takes a few years to get everything to where Apple and Android have it today.

    So as a business owner what do you do?
    You use your own competitor to give you a bust into the app market.

    As long as this move helps RIM stabilize their OS so they don't have to kill the PlayBook, then I'm all for it.

    If QNX proves to be as good as I think it is, then people will start developing for it.

    If you build it (QNX OS), they will come (developers)!
    lwaysluking likes this.
    10-20-11 08:07 PM
  13. z_scorpio_z's Avatar
    RIM is doing a lot more as well to attract developers to make apps for PB. Android player is one easy quick option for developers, web works uses html5 and is attractive to web developers, Adobe flash/air is attractive to Adobe Air developers and native SDK gives developers chance to use C/C++. The last one, writing native apps, is not as bad option either for the developers either, especially with PB supporting lot of other SDKs such as Unity/Marmalade etc. EA for example, ported many games over to the PB already since they were made with marmalade. PB is also POSIX complaint, which makes it easy to port linux/unix programs. I am not a developer, but I saw a lot of other SDK partnerships being shown/announced during the devcon (which are currently being used by developers for Android/iOS development), these essentially should make it easy for developers to port their code to PB (as native apps). Just like all the most popular apps come to both iOS and Android, it will be easy for the same code to be adjusted and release for PB/BBX etc. The development tools coming out for PB are on par with what developers are used to for Android/iOS, plugins that hook right inside the IDEs that developers are already using etc.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    lotuslanderz likes this.
    10-20-11 08:42 PM
  14. Chaplain_Clancy's Avatar
    It does look bad for RIM or any other company to use their competition to help themselves.

    But......

    I think its a very smart move by RIM. Lets face it, we all know that the Playbook and its new QNX OS is awesome, but it came out in a market controlled and dominated by Apple and Android. Those 2 systems are very well in place and growing. Bringing a whole new OS system like WebOS or QNX must be very tough on a company. Not only your product must have something that the other 2 don't in order to compete, but you depend on a lot of people (developers) moving your product.
    Long story short is it does not happen over night and takes a few years to get everything to where Apple and Android have it today.

    So as a business owner what do you do?
    You use your own competitor to give you a bust into the app market.

    As long as this move helps RIM stabilize their OS so they don't have to kill the PlayBook, then I'm all for it.

    If QNX proves to be as good as I think it is, then people will start developing for it.

    If you build it (QNX OS), they will come (developers)!
    Have you ever heard the fable of why the sparrow is King of the birds?
    10-20-11 09:25 PM
  15. murnende's Avatar
    Seriously, this has been debated non-stop for over a year since the intent for Android support was announced. They're doing it, they're not changing their minds at this point, let it go.
    lotuslanderz likes this.
    10-20-11 09:52 PM
  16. kb5zht's Avatar
    Android apps on the playbook is a good thing imho.

    Basically, everybody wins. PB owners get their number of apps available increased over ten fold.... and rim can attract more people to the device.
    lwaysluking likes this.
    10-20-11 10:03 PM
  17. Wangta's Avatar
    Seriously, this has been debated non-stop for over a year since the intent for Android support was announced. They're doing it, they're not changing their minds at this point, let it go.
    This is not a complaint - just some debate on how this could help/hurt the Playbook going forward. I think at this point, we have all "let this go".
    10-20-11 10:19 PM
  18. lwaysluking's Avatar
    I partially share the OP's concern about the Android player being a disincentive to some developers in terms of developing directly for PB, but I also feel that Android player may actually invite more developers to the platform that would normally have dismissed it as "it's just another Blackberry, why bother?"
    Having been drawn to Playbook by the curiosity of knowing how well their app would run on it (and the possibility to monetize on a new platform), it wouldn't take them long to realize that Android player does not leverage the full power of the playbook and doesn't seem to access all of "the metal" below. Case in point: I sideloaded the Flikster app onto my PB running the version 2 OS and noticed it could not show me movies playing nearby because it couldn't get a location fix using my built in GPS (I entered a zip code manually to get it to work).
    I also downloaded a magazine to the Kindle reader within Android player and noticed that, while good, the performance of the page "turning" was inferior to the normally razor sharp response of the Playbook (probably because the graphics hardware could not be accessed directly).
    Most apps would probably run pretty decently in AP (Android Player), but some apps really need to tap the hardware closely. AP is simply running "within the pipes" of the Playbook, and I hope that astute developers see this and use the AP as a welcome mat to develop the best version of their app that they can for PB by using the native SDK or anything else from the awesome array of tools to program the device.
    10-20-11 11:04 PM
  19. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    The real question is: will Android apps help the adoption of QNX? I suspect the answer may not be as simple as we hope for.

    Considering what RIM is facing, I think it is a good strategy, but will it lead to sales? We are assuming that apps alone will bridge the mindshare gap; what about other parts of the ecosystem?

    Good discussion...
    10-20-11 11:20 PM
  20. shootsscores's Avatar
    RIM is doing a lot more as well to attract developers to make apps for PB. Android player is one easy quick option for developers, web works uses html5 and is attractive to web developers, Adobe flash/air is attractive to Adobe Air developers and native SDK gives developers chance to use C/C++. The last one, writing native apps, is not as bad option either for the developers either, especially with PB supporting lot of other SDKs such as Unity/Marmalade etc. EA for example, ported many games over to the PB already since they were made with marmalade. PB is also POSIX complaint, which makes it easy to port linux/unix programs. I am not a developer, but I saw a lot of other SDK partnerships being shown/announced during the devcon (which are currently being used by developers for Android/iOS development), these essentially should make it easy for developers to port their code to PB (as native apps). Just like all the most popular apps come to both iOS and Android, it will be easy for the same code to be adjusted and release for PB/BBX etc. The development tools coming out for PB are on par with what developers are used to for Android/iOS, plugins that hook right inside the IDEs that developers are already using etc.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    QNX is more than POSIX compliant. It is POSIX certified according to QNX. The QNX web site mentions both terms, compliant and certified, and makes it clear that QNX has the higher certification. I believe I read somewhere that the "X" in QNX stands for POSIX.

    On an unrelated note, a colleague of mine who owns a the latest tab made by the leading competitor says that his device has been doing all sorts of crazy things since he updated its OS. I noticed him trying to get the screen orientation to change but it was frozen. I asked him what was going on and he told me about it. He said that he had done numerous reboots but he couldn't get it to unfreeze. It was weird watching him have to flick an actual switch for locking the orientation in an attempt to free up the screen. Struck me as being quite primitive.
    10-21-11 12:37 AM
  21. southlander's Avatar
    Good thing, overall. Google is trying to get a handle on Android's fragmentation issues. The better that works, that plays into what RIM's doing. It'll give RIM a consistent target to ensure compatibility.

    Second point is like it or not the enterpise is going to be loaded with lots of custom Android apps. By having compatibility, it means RIM can sell into there with the PlayBook and phones.

    In general compatibility trumps all else so long as the performance is sufficient and the implementation seamless.

    As for it helping QNX or hurting it, the fact is people are not dying for yet another development platform. RIM's going to have to show clear advantages for QNX. I think if most apps used on BBX at first are Android, and then there is a smaller set of QNX apps that are better in multitasking, have enhanced integration with some other services (like car electronics, etc), that will be ok.

    Sent from my BlackBerry 9930 using Tapatalk
    10-21-11 01:06 AM
  22. TheScionicMan's Avatar
    If an app can be better quality as a native app, then it would probably command a higher price than its non-native counterpart. If being native won't add any benefits, then using an app that was originally written for Android doesn't make that much difference, does it?

    Apps are becoming more of a standardized commodity this way. Supporting multiple apps is really no different than supporting different photo formats or movie codecs.
    10-21-11 02:39 PM
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