03-18-15 07:17 PM
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  1. early2bed's Avatar
    Some screenshots of a iOS in Car user interface showed up in the most recent iOS beta. I'm guessing that the actual brains are still on the phone but the UI is displayed on the car dash unit. That way the OS can be updated over the years without having to worry about doing the same in the car. You don't need QNX in this instance to do very much except to act as a display and touch screen driver.

    irst introduced alongside iOS 7, the upcoming iOS in the Car feature is designed to provide enhanced iOS integration in automobiles, offering an iOS-style interface on the car's touchscreen dash that allows users to make phone calls, access Maps, control music, and more. As shown in the screenshots, the software includes a warning screen like most typical GPS software, and it also has a home screen and an area for bookmarks.

    Leaked 'iOS in the Car' Screenshots Show Possible Design Evolution - Mac Rumors
    01-21-14 07:08 PM
  2. gng11's Avatar
    Some screenshots of a iOS in Car user interface showed up in the most recent iOS beta. I'm guessing that the actual brains are still on the phone but the UI is displayed on the car dash unit. That way the OS can be updated over the years without having to worry about doing the same in the car. You don't need QNX in this instance to do very much except to act as a display and touch screen driver.

    irst introduced alongside iOS 7, the upcoming iOS in the Car feature is designed to provide enhanced iOS integration in automobiles, offering an iOS-style interface on the car's touchscreen dash that allows users to make phone calls, access Maps, control music, and more. As shown in the screenshots, the software includes a warning screen like most typical GPS software, and it also has a home screen and an area for bookmarks.

    Leaked 'iOS in the Car' Screenshots Show Possible Design Evolution - Mac Rumors
    Blackberry and QNX really need to step up their visibility game. It's all marketing and this is something Blackberry cannot repeat mistakes of clearly not stamping their credit on a market that is clearly theirs.
    01-27-14 02:24 PM
  3. early2bed's Avatar
    iOS in the Car; 7.0.3



    The 88-second-long video shows the iOS simulator running on what appears to be an OS X Mavericks desktop with a virtual 800 pixel by 480 pixel display connected. Opening the simulator's Maps app shows a specially-formatted version on the virtual display, and the content can be manipulated from either device.
    01-28-14 12:46 PM
  4. gng11's Avatar
    iOS in the Car; 7.0.3



    The 88-second-long video shows the iOS simulator running on what appears to be an OS X Mavericks desktop with a virtual 800 pixel by 480 pixel display connected. Opening the simulator's Maps app shows a specially-formatted version on the virtual display, and the content can be manipulated from either device.
    Yeah this is what I meant by BlackBerry stamping their credit. BlackBerry 10 OS in the car please!

    Posted via CB10
    05-12-14 03:23 PM
  5. anon1727506's Avatar
    Yeah this is what I meant by BlackBerry stamping their credit. BlackBerry 10 OS in the car please!

    Posted via CB10
    Nissan Management to BlackBerry/QNX team.... "We'd like to see how you would integrate Instagram content into the interface"....

    Will Apple beat Blackberry to the in-car UX?-download.jpg

    BlackBerry's limitations are going to hurt QNX's chances of being the "visible" portion of the interface.
    05-12-14 04:00 PM
  6. Jamie Brahm's Avatar
    I don't see how a closed system like apple stands a chance long term in a car OS, where you need even more cross platform networking than in a tablet. Mind you, surprising the number of ipad users atm, given that its not properly windows network compatible, so I guess it could be fashion driven for a small period of time.
    05-12-14 10:05 PM
  7. Jamie Brahm's Avatar
    Iphone used to have over 30% of market share, and now sits around 15. its probably going to drop further. That nine million phones in two days, is probably a good example of apples general mobile device pattern - huge adoption, and then crash because its sort of faddish.
    05-12-14 10:10 PM
  8. bakron1's Avatar
    Iphone used to have over 30% of market share, and now sits around 15. its probably going to drop further. That nine million phones in two days, is probably a good example of apples general mobile device pattern - huge adoption, and then crash because its sort of faddish.
    Faddish!!! Apple sold 14 million iPhones last quarter alone and I don't see it slowing down anytime soon.

    Any device doesn't have to have the latest super processor, video graphics and/or greatest OS. It's just has to have what the consumer wants and Apple seems to have found it and are making billions doing it. Basic business concepts 101.


    Sent using the CB Forum App
    05-13-14 04:29 AM
  9. anon1727506's Avatar
    Iphone used to have over 30% of market share, and now sits around 15. its probably going to drop further. That nine million phones in two days, is probably a good example of apples general mobile device pattern - huge adoption, and then crash because its sort of faddish.
    Wishing will not make it so.

    Apple isn't crashing, the still sell more devices each quarter than they did the last quarter. The iPhone problem is Apple wants to make too much profit on it (and the iPad).

    If next fall Apple releases a 6" iPhone and prices it at cost, they would not be able to make them fast enough..... and Apple could function just fine selling devices at cost for a couple of years. It would hurt their stock price, but I'm always hearing how that doesn't matter.

    BlackBerry on the other had could release a 6" SuperPhone and price it at cost, and they would be lucky to sell more than 2 Million of them in the quarter. And most of those will be to people that own Z10, Z30 and Q10 - so they impact on the platform would be negligible.

    People like the iPhone experience and ecosystem - sure they want a bigger screen and more memory. But that isn't the same as wanting their Direct TV App to work, or not being able to play Candy Crush or not being able to buy their kids a Disney Princess Pet....
    05-13-14 07:37 AM
  10. BCITMike's Avatar
    Faddish!!! Apple sold 14 million iPhones last quarter alone and I don't see it slowing down anytime soon.

    Any device doesn't have to have the latest super processor, video graphics and/or greatest OS. It's just has to have what the consumer wants and Apple seems to have found it and are making billions doing it. Basic business concepts 101.


    Sent using the CB Forum App
    Your argument is an example of why their sales are not sustainable. When the smartphone market is starting off, no one has a phone and so there are lots of potential customers. Years later, everyone and their grandmother and dog has a phone (sigh, people literally give phones to dogs and give them twitter and email accounts).

    There are lots of reasons why people won't buy future Apple phones. For example, lots of first time buyers get an Apple, because that's what they were told or think they should do. Then they realize that they don't need a $700 phone to make a few phone calls and its overkill. They don't get future sales from this customer. This customer will aim for a no frills $200 phone next time. This will account for a small percentage of customers.

    Then there are the feature phones like the One+ that will sell for cost, $300, and absolutely annihilate the iPhone hardware. So the people who want the latest and greatest hardware jump ship. This will account for another small percentage.

    Then there are the people who use Apple for the must-have apps. They are pretty much all offered on Android, so there they will lose a small percentage of users that switch to Android because they are not app-dependent on Apple.

    There are lots of little reasons that'll eventually add/catch up. They had record breaking profits for years WAY too easy. That ride was not sustainable and will have to come to an end.
    05-13-14 08:24 PM
  11. early2bed's Avatar
    Here's a recent article from the WSJ about car apps. Other than car manufacturers, the only company mentioned is Apple.

    THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
    TECHNOLOGY
    New Cars Becoming Mobile WiFi Hotspots
    After Slow Start, Cars and Apps Makers Improve Software, Communications Links

    By NEAL E. BOUDETTE
    Updated May 14, 2014 6:14 p.m. ET
    Mercedes-Benz is developing a new infotainment system, based on Apple's CarPlay software, that looks and feels like your iPhone, automotive correspondent Neal Boudette reports.
    The long-promised demolition of the barriers that separate drivers from the information and entertainment available through smartphone apps is finally shifting into high gear.

    Driven by consumer gripes—and by visions of new streams of revenue—auto makers and major players in the smartphone and apps industry dug into their software and hardware to remove a variety of obstacles to smooth integration of vehicle displays and the output from apps.

    Now, a wave of new models hitting showrooms have dashboard electronics designed to make it dramatically easier to access smartphone apps that could provide real-time traffic maps, parking access and weather reports on the road.

    "This year is a tipping point," said Thilo Koslowski, a Gartner Inc. analyst who follows in-car technology. "There has been a lot of talk about apps in cars, but from 2014 forward, the revolution really happens."

    General Motors Co. has started embedding Pandora, a music-streaming app, into the dashboards of most Chevrolets, Buicks and Cadillacs. Honda Motor Co. puts Aha Radio in its cars. Buy a 2014 Mercedes-Benz, and you'll find the TuneIn radio app built in the dash, giving the car access to radio broadcasts from around the world via your smartphone. Next year GM and Audi will roll out models with their own 4G high-speed Internet connections, so drivers won't even need smartphones at all.

    BMW AG is working on setting up an app store, modeled on Apple Inc. 's iTunes, to deliver automotive apps to its owners. The store is expected to launch in Europe later this year and in the U.S. in 2015.

    For the car makers, electronics and communications capabilities are becoming key selling features, and for many buyers, especially the coveted younger consumers and first-time car buyers, they're more important than horsepower or handling. "This is a big transition in the industry in the digital context" said Mathias Haller, chief architect of infotainment systems at Audi.

    Car makers can't afford to fall behind or take a wrong turn on dashboard technology. Ford Motor Co. was an early leader with its Sync system, but later, more complex versions have proved buggy and frustrating to customers, and have hurt the company's standing in quality surveys.

    Apps, the little software programs that make our phones so indispensible, are quickly becoming part of our cars, too. Auto reporter Neal Boudette takes a look at the trend, and demonstrates Pandora, a music app, that is built into a Buick LaCrosse.
    Call it Carapps 2.0. For the past few years, new cars have had the technology—USB ports, microphones, Bluetooth—enabling drivers to make hands-free phone calls. And in some models it is possible to listen to podcasts or stream music from a smartphone. But the first generation of these interfaces were often clunky, distracting and potentially dangerous. Frustrated by confusing voice commands, drivers were forced to pick up their phones—and hope their thumb taps the right icon or swipes the screen the right way to select a song, look up an address, or enter a destination.

    That won't be the case soon. Last month at the New York International Auto Show, Mercedes-Benz demonstrated a car equipped with an early version of an infotainment system that uses Apple's iOS extension for automobiles, CarPlay. It has the same look and feel as an iPhone—the icons that appear on the car's display are the same as the iPhone's icons.

    "If the driver has less to learn, then it makes it more safe," said Kal Mos, Mercedes's director of connected infotainment. Mr. Mos said the system could start appearing in Mercedes vehicles by year end.

    Christine Bickley, a computer professional in Riverdale, N.J., found that out recently when she drove home in a loaded 2014 Kia Forte. Its UVO infotainment syncs up with her Samsung Galaxy phone automatically, and then lets her stream music into the car from an app—she uses Spotify—all without ever taking her hands off the wheel or eyes from the road.

    "It is so cool. It connects with Bluetooth when I get in the car. There's a button on the steering wheel so I can change playlists. I never touch the phone—it stays in my purse," said Ms. Bickley. The information about the artist, song and playlist that is usually found on the phone's screen appears for her on the car's display.

    "When I got the car," Ms. Bickley said, "I called a friend and was like, you have to see this."

    The mobile technology providers and car makers remain wary of each other, but they also have a lot to gain if they can win over more consumers such as Ms. Bickley.

    "It is an absolute arms race to put [smartphone technology] into every car," said Kanwalinder Singh, vice president of business development at Qualcomm Inc., whose computer chips are key components of smartphones and increasingly are turning up in automobiles. About 100 million cars sold each year world-wide, and right now only about 10% have some kind of built-in communications system, he says.

    Safety experts are hoping new dashboard electronics that work more easily with smartphones eventually will lessen driver distraction. Adrian Lund, president of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, said early studies suggest that the distraction problem at least isn't getting worse. While there are more things drivers can do with smartphones, it is becoming easier for them to do these things without taking their eyes off the road and hands off the wheel.

    "It looks like drivers are no more distracted by all this technology than they were before," Mr. Lund said.

    Apps for streaming music and navigation are only the start of what people will soon be able to do in their cars. Ford has shown its infotainment system running an app that places orders at the nearest Domino's Pizza outlet. Recently, auto makers have started allowing software developers to draw data from the car itself, like fuel economy. Developers imagine creating apps that track detailed gas mileage for every trip a car makes, or even lets groups of friends or family members view each other's results to see who drives most efficiently.

    "Everything that has been showing up in smartphones is going to show up in cars," said Bryan Trussel, founder of Glympse, which makes an app that lets people track the location of friends they are meeting. BMW and other auto makers started embedding Glympse into new cars this year.

    Write to Neal E. Boudette at neal.boudette@wsj.com
    05-14-14 07:36 PM
  12. tchocky77's Avatar
    Nobody on crackberry seems to understand the iPhone 5S's A7 chipset.

    That's innovation people.


    Sent from my iPhone using CB Forums
    techvisor likes this.
    05-14-14 07:44 PM
  13. early2bed's Avatar
    An update from the NY Times regarding car dash interfaces:

    Google and Apple Fight for the Car Dashboard
    By AARON M. KESSLER and BRIAN X. CHENFEB. 22, 2015

    MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. — When Google hosted a boot camp here this month for its Android operating system, there were some new faces in the room: auto manufacturers.

    They made the trip to learn about Android Auto, a new dashboard system meant to let a smartphone power a car’s center screen. Tasks as varied as navigation, communication and music apps, all constantly talking to the cloud. And to the driver.

    A similar scene is playing out just a few miles down the road at Apple, where a rival system, CarPlay, has been developed for iPhone users.

    After years of being treated as an interesting side business, autos have become the latest obsession for Silicon Valley, with Apple assigning about 200 engineers to work on electric vehicle technology and Google saying it envisions the public using driverless car s within five years.

    But nowhere is that obsession playing out more immediately than in the battle to develop the next generation of cars’ dashboard systems. In the coming weeks and months, dealerships around the country will begin selling vehicles capable of running Android Auto, Apple CarPlay, or both.

    The systems go far beyond currently available Bluetooth pairing for playing music or making a hands-free call, and allow for Google’s or Apple’s operating system to essentially take over the center screen and certain buttons within the car.

    “Consumers have spoken,” said John Maddox, assistant director of the University of Michigan’s Mobility Transformation Center. “They expect to have coordination between their phone and their vehicle.”

    Here at Google’s headquarters, Android Auto is about to make its debut in Americans’ cars after two years in development. Plug in a smartphone with a USB cord and the system powers up on a car’s screen. The phone’s screen, meanwhile, goes dark, not to be touched while driving.

    Apple’s CarPlay works similarly, with bubbly icons for phone calls, music, maps, messaging and other apps appearing on the center screen. (Apple declined to comment for this article.)

    While the idea of constantly connected drivers zipping along roads raises concerns about distracted driving, both companies say their systems are designed with the opposite goal: to make cellphone-toting drivers safer.

    “We looked at what people do with their phones in the car, and it was scary,” said Andrew Brenner, the lead project manager of Google’s Android Auto team. “You want to say to them, ‘Yikes, no, don’t do that.’ ”

    Mr. Brenner said his team tried to figure out how to minimize distraction during tasks people frequently do while driving, while also deciding what should be prevented in the car altogether. Google even built its own driver-distraction lab, to test different variations.

    Android Auto, for example, has no “back” button like the smartphone version. No “recents” button either. Google Maps has been adjusted to make fonts bigger and streets less detailed, for easier reading while driving.

    No action should take more than two seconds — consistent with the Transportation Department’s voluntary guidelines.

    “Things that we don’t show are just as important as what we do show,” Mr. Brenner said.

    Music is most definitely in. Streaming video? Most definitely not. Most social media will also be blocked, and texts can be sent only with voice commands. Apps on the screen are optimized for speed: glance, touch and eyes back to the road.

    “It’s these little glances at the screen that people do in a car,” he said. “We want something that’s very glanceable, that can be seen and done quickly.”

    On a recent afternoon, Mr. Brenner drove through the streets here in a Hyundai Sonata equipped with a demonstration version of Android Auto. Part techie, part car guy, Mr. Brenner was hired two years ago after Google discovered he had rigged up a Nexus 7 tablet to his dashboard in an early attempt to make his own connected car.

    “Navigate to Krispy Kreme,” he said after settling into the driver’s seat. Up popped the nearest location on the screen, and a voice began turn-by-turn directions. A little music never hurt either: “Play Black Sabbath,” he said.

    The Krispy Kreme near Google’s campus played a notable role for Mr. Brenner and his team of engineers. It was the destination they always tried to reach during testing without Android Auto failing along the way.

    “They thought we were a little nuts,” he said. “We would pull up with four people taking notes and order three dozen doughnuts for the engineering team.”

    It took until last April to finally succeed in making the trip without a glitch. They added some Champagne to bring back from that doughnut run.

    When the Android Auto project began, it included a core group of automakers like General Motors, Audi, Honda and Hyundai. Now, as it prepares for its debut, roughly two dozen car brands have signed on to offer it soon. Apple has teamed up with roughly the same number of brands, many of which will offer both systems.

    Most automakers are staying mum on their exact start dates, but Hyundai is expected to act shortly, and Volkswagen has indicated availability for its next Golf. G.M. has said the same about its Spark subcompact.

    Apple’s CarPlay system uses an iPhone to power a car’s center screen. Google has a rival system. Roughly two dozen car brands have signed on with each system; many cars will offer both. Credit Apple
    One of the most widespread adopters will be Ford, which this year will begin offering both Android Auto and CarPlay in conjunction with the revamping of the automaker’s much-criticized Sync system. By the end of 2016, they will be available on all Fords sold in the United States.

    “We don’t want people to have to make a vehicle choice based on which mobile phone they have,” said Don Butler, Ford’s executive director for connected vehicles and services. “We want to accommodate all customers and their devices.”

    While automakers traditionally aimed to control all aspects of the infotainment experience — building their own closed-off, proprietary systems — the results were not always stellar. And the pace of technology meant a car’s hardware and software could become dated quickly.

    In some cases, the systems carried what seemed to be needless costs, like an annual fee for updating map software — something unthinkable for any user of Google Maps or Apple Maps.

    Mr. Butler said that leveraging smartphones and the ecosystem of apps surrounding them provided a new way forward.

    “The challenge with closed systems is you need to predict where the future is heading, or have enough robustness that it’s future proof, which of course is virtually impossible,” he said. “We think it’s better to put a broad platform for innovation in place.”

    One area where automakers have struggled mightily, but the tech giants have found more success, is in voice recognition. Using voice commands has huge potential to help keep drivers’ eyes focused on the road. The challenge there is that they have to work.

    “Many of the systems out there now in cars, the voice interface is almost unusable,” said Mr. Maddox, the University of Michigan transportation expert. “It’s inaccurate, people get frustrated and they’ll just stop using it.”

    J.D. Power’s 2014 Initial Quality Study found that consumers cited bad voice recognition as their most dissatisfying experience when buying a new car.

    In Apple’s CarPlay, Siri, the voice-controlled assistant, guides the system, and the company provided specifications to automakers to ensure that a user’s voice is easily understandable while inside the car. If a user’s car has a touch screen or control knobs, CarPlay can be controlled that way as well.

    Google has taken similar steps to make sure that consumers can speak as they normally do. As he approached the doughnut shop, Mr. Brenner said that getting consumers comfortable with voice commands is all about allowing them to say things in different ways.

    “I could have said ‘Take me to Krispy Kreme,’ or ‘Go to Krispy Kreme’ or even just ‘Krispy Kreme’ and it would have figured out what I wanted,” he said.

    But despite the momentum building in Silicon Valley, not all automakers are sold on the idea of giving up their dashboards to the tech giants.

    John Hanson, the national manager of Toyota’s advanced technology communications, said while the company talked frequently with both Google and Apple, it currently had no plans to adopt Android Auto or CarPlay in the United States.

    “We may all eventually wind up there, but right now we prefer to use our in-house proprietary platforms for those kinds of functions,” Mr. Hanson said.

    Fiat Chrysler, considered to have one of the better infotainment platforms on the market, has signed on to support Google’s and Apple’s systems. But a bit of lament is evident.

    “We’re confident that our systems deliver a good experience for our customers,” said Eric Mayne, a spokesman at Chrysler. “But we’re not standing still either.”

    As Mr. Brenner pulled into the drive-through line at Krispy Kreme, the attendant on duty, seeing three people in the car, asked: “You guys want anything?”

    “One original glazed doughnut please,” he replied.

    “Only one?” came the surprised response. “Anything else?”

    “No, we’re all set,” he said.

    Aaron M. Kessler reported from Mountain View, Calif., and Brian X. Chen from San Francisco.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/23/te...ttom-well&_r=0
    02-23-15 12:49 PM
  14. ccbs's Avatar
    Nobody on crackberry seems to understand the iPhone 5S's A7 chipset.

    That's innovation people.


    Sent from my iPhone using CB Forums
    This is Crackberry. What do you expect?

    Joking aside, Apple is leading the hardware race especially CPU and GPU in SOC compared to Android. I have a few former coworkers went back to China and are now working in Xiaomi. They were really looking to beat Apple in SOC's end but unfortunately there are just none in the market. Snapdragon 810 is a disappointment and really highlights how advance Apple is in the SOC design. A lot of hope is put on the recent announced Cortex A72, which matches very well with the current Apple core in A8. However, the A72 based silicon is still a year away and is using 1Xnm FIN-FET. Nvidia K1 and X1 are very impressive but the there are bugs and the power envelope are just too high to be used in smart phone.
    Apple key weakness is the total amount of ram included in phone, partially due to their obsession with MCM design. Outside of crackberry, it is generally accepted within the high-end smart phone market that Apple is leading the phone spec on its new phone.
    02-23-15 02:32 PM
  15. lnichols's Avatar
    An update from the NY Times regarding car dash interfaces:



    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/23/te...ttom-well&_r=0
    And yet here we are with still no Mirrorlink support in BlackBerry 10 devices, but QNX supports Apple and Google's in car interface. Just once as a BlackBerry phone user, I would like to be a priority for BlackBerry and not the last device to work fully with their QNX infotainment systems. At least release full Mirrorlink support so those QNX concept car to BlackBerry device demos are more than vaporware.

    Posted via CB10
    gng11 likes this.
    02-23-15 03:47 PM
  16. Sulaco757's Avatar
    Apple has a LOT of money. They don't want the car UI, they want to build a car. Want Applecare with that? Oh and don't bother asking below retail. Perhaps it can be so "connected" it'll automatically print your speeding ticket for you if you drive 11 mph over. What a cool feature Apple, you can save your iSlaves 15 minutes and an embarrassing traffic stop!

    Really though, why does BlackBerry have to compete with Apple there? Compete with them on the corporate mobile market because BlackBerry devices better suit business and security needs.

    The Apple chipset is fantastic, and how they refined the 8 mpxl camera is also a feat. But with Apple you get a closed user experience controlled by Apple. That spec sheet may run well today, but tomorrow 1 gb of Ram won't cut it. Some iFans already admit it already doesn't. A brand new phone with Native apps crashing. Only Apple can get away with that. Let them have their 700 Billion $ day. They will also peak and have to learn how to innovate again too.


     Posted via CB Chen 
    02-24-15 07:54 PM
  17. abwan11's Avatar
    700 billion and two years to make a watch?? Now their talking about making what? Get the fck out of here..

    Posted via CB10
    02-24-15 08:34 PM
  18. gng11's Avatar
    But seriously, Blackberry and QNX really need to work together to build a Blackberry-friendly UI and system. Me thinks the time is now, even if it's R&D at the moment.
    03-14-15 03:23 AM
  19. BoldBigWorm's Avatar
    LMFAO QNX has this one on lock. iPhone will do something stupid and oly make the car connect to an iPhone.

    Posted via CB10
    03-15-15 09:28 PM
  20. tchocky77's Avatar
    LMFAO QNX has this one on lock. iPhone will do something stupid and oly make the car connect to an iPhone.

    Posted via CB10
    QNX is there whether its Android or iOS. Its not user-facing. And the QNX license is pennies. So it's never been a big revenue stream. For that matter, neither is Android in the car or iOS in the car. Its a feature meant to sell phones.

    But yeah. QNx is There with either. And has been. For years.

    Posted via the CrackBerry App for Android
    TGR1, JeepBB and techvisor like this.
    03-15-15 11:15 PM
  21. nt300's Avatar
    Apple can't do JACK without BlackBerry's QNX.

    Posted via CB10
    03-18-15 06:25 AM
  22. Malakbel's Avatar
    Apple is partnering with QNX in the infotainment market. Blackberry and QNX seems to have a solid lead this market. Ford left Microsoft to use the QNX system.

    Posted via CB10
    03-18-15 07:17 PM
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