07-09-12 12:23 PM
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  1. JPMorgan_'s Avatar
    RIM's secret weapon is actually pretty cool

    Research In Motion CEO Thorsten Heins has been hinting that BlackBerry 10 will capitalize on the strengths of the QNX operating system.


    It's become fashionable of late to bash Research In Motion and the decline of all things BlackBerry. With the constant delays of BlackBerry 10, the flop that was the PlayBook, odd behavior by executives, sinking valuation and thousands of layoffs, the trash talk isn't without justification.

    But as CEO Thorsten Heins recently implored the Canadian press, the one-time northern king of the smartphone realm shouldn't be counted out of the mobile game of thrones just yet. RIM has a secret weapon -- more overlooked than secret, actually -- and truth be told, it's got the potential to be pretty cool, if properly executed.

    In an editorial published Tuesday in Canada's Globe and Mail, Heins stuck up for BlackBerry 10, which he says he's "committed" to releasing in the first part of next year:

    BlackBerry 10 will connect users not just to each other, but to the embedded systems that run constantly in the background of everyday life -- from parking meters and car computers to credit card machines and ticket counters.

    That's a pretty clear reference to QNX, the operating system that RIM bought a few years ago with a long history of influence in the embedded systems market. QNX real-time operating systems can be found all over, but especially in places where security and precision is paramount, including in medical devices, public transit, air traffic control, nuclear power plants and aboard the International Space Station.

    If your vehicle has any kind of infotainment or navigation system, there's a decent chance that the QNX CAR platform might be underneath that pretty (or not so pretty) skin -- the company says it's been licensed for use on 20 million cars worldwide. QNX CAR takes advantage of HTML5 and can interface with not just BlackBerry, but also iOS and Android devices.

    A version of QNX underlies the BlackBerry PlayBook OS and will be at the heart of BlackBerry 10. The OS' emphasis on security makes perfect sense given BlackBerry's reputation for providing a secure device that won't give the IT department a panic attack, but Heins' comments this week make it clear that RIM also hopes to capitalize on the QNX legacy in the embedded systems world by trying to succeed in an area that Apple has so far ignored and Google has yet to gain serious traction -- near-field communication.

    In another piece published today in the Globe and Mail, Heins answered a question from a reader about the delayed BlackBerry 10 release with this:

    BlackBerry 10 is more than just a new smartphone. It's an entirely new way of thinking about BlackBerry -- new software powering new devices and new services. While our competitors update their offerings, BlackBerry 10 will be the only mobile platform built from the ground up with the latest technologies in mind -- whether it's mobile video chat or near-field communications that enable you to use your handset like a wallet.


    Clearly, BlackBerry 10 won't be all about NFC, but if done right and QNX phones truly do interface with the numerous other systems we encounter on a daily basis in a seamless and intuitive way, it could be a major selling point.

    Finally creating the killer digital wallet application -- one that would work easily for things like paying tolls and parking meters -- could also inject RIM with a significant amount of mojo, and who doesn't want a smartphone that can interface with the International Space Station should you ever happen to be in the neighborhood?

    Problem is, RIM's fortunes seem more dire than ever and none of this will likely see the light of day for at least six months -- six months during which Apple and Android will also build better and more robust tools while bringing millions of new users to their respective teams.

    Tell you what Thorsten -- I won't count you out just yet, but keep in mind that BlackBerrys typically ripen in the fall. Hopefully you've loaded up on plenty of canning supplies and pectin to keep 'em fresh until spring.

    RIM's secret weapon is actually pretty cool | Mobile - CNET News
    07-07-12 11:18 AM
  2. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    Pretty cool ? no
    -> Fuc4ing awsome !
    OriginalLucy likes this.
    07-07-12 12:30 PM
  3. amazinglygraceless's Avatar
    Is there EVER going to be a point where we stop rehashing the same articles
    over and over again
    07-07-12 12:36 PM
  4. drjay868's Avatar
    Very nice, fair, and objective article. I'm glad to see someone in the media "gets it". Not just what BB10 is all about, but what real journalism is.
    07-07-12 12:36 PM
  5. kbz1960's Avatar
    Yes it is cool and I like the part of interfacing with android and iOS unlike apples car infotainment system which from what I've heard only interfaces with apple.
    07-07-12 12:38 PM
  6. kbz1960's Avatar
    Is there EVER going to be a point where we stop rehashing the same articles
    over and over again
    No.

    I figure if you can't beat em join em.
    07-07-12 12:38 PM
  7. drjay868's Avatar
    Is there EVER going to be a point where we stop rehashing the same articles
    over and over again
    Was there a thread with this article from WSJ posted already?
    big_time2 likes this.
    07-07-12 12:50 PM
  8. CairnsRock's Avatar
    It's nice to talk about NfC and BB10 being capable and all. But, if the infrastructure is not there at the bank, parking meter, checkout etc. It doesn't mean a whole lot.

    Kinda like 3D TV.
    07-07-12 01:04 PM
  9. kbz1960's Avatar
    It's nice to talk about NfC and BB10 being capable and all. But, if the infrastructure is not there at the bank, parking meter, checkout etc. It doesn't mean a whole lot.

    Kinda like 3D TV.
    So now it's a problem adding in an option that may not be widely used for a year or so to a device that will be used on a contract for 2 years or more?

    I wish people would make up their minds. BB users, we don't need that. iOS and android users, even if we don't use it we have the choice. Who wants to be stuck using a phone for 2 years that isn't future proof as much as possible.
    07-07-12 01:15 PM
  10. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Very nice, fair, and objective article. I'm glad to see someone in the media "gets it". Not just what BB10 is all about, but what real journalism is.
    Because they wrote something you like?

    LOL.

    I think I am liking the idea of an interim device more and more though. Talking up stuff without showing it cannot be doing too much good.
    07-07-12 01:41 PM
  11. qbnkelt's Avatar
    If I can use my Blackberry to pay my fare on the Metro, I'd be one happy puppy...
    ekafara likes this.
    07-07-12 02:33 PM
  12. SK122387's Avatar
    I've had NFC on my 9900 since I got the phone in August, and I have yet to use it once. T-Mobile, my carrier, doesn't offer anything involving mobile payments from BlackBerry, though I have read that Visa and Mastercard have approved the 99xx for their mobile payments..so I'm not really sure what the hold up is.

    In theory, NFC is great. I'd love to be able to wave my 9900 or BB10 phone by a pay terminal to pay for things at stores or wherever. Unless RIM changes the game and jumpstarts the NFC market by announcing partnerships with lots of places, I have a feeling that we will have to wait for the new iPhone to get NFC before vendors open their eyes/are forced to implement it by Apple and the millions of people in North America that will buy their latest and greatest in the Fall
    johnmarki likes this.
    07-07-12 03:49 PM
  13. missing_K-W's Avatar
    We need to step back and instead of looking at how QNX will redefine the BlackBerry experience.....Begin to see how RIM is becoming a critical factor to the advances of QNX in their existing markets and beyond. Especially now that QNX will have a native GUI for QNX to deploy their systems in a broader reach such as appliances, home automation etc...

    There is a net benefit that works both ways for both RIM and QNX Independent of each other
    07-07-12 06:39 PM
  14. Bilaal's Avatar
    CNET actually posted this? God, I'm shocked.
    Just Me likes this.
    07-08-12 08:14 AM
  15. njblackberry's Avatar
    So far, NFC is a solution looking for a problem. The retailers have not adopted it yet. Perhaps in a few years. But it is not a differentiating factor when a consumer buys a phone. Yet.
    johnmarki, soren203 and OMGitworks like this.
    07-08-12 08:25 AM
  16. Stewartj1's Avatar
    Good post OP, seeing a positive article from CNET is newsworthy and significant in itself - hopefully it's evidence of a slow but sure change in attitude in the blogosphere.
    07-08-12 08:52 AM
  17. pantlesspenguin's Avatar
    The first time I remember hearing about NFC was on the Nexus S which was released in January '11 IIRC. Since then it's been released on a handful of other devices. My Amaze had it. I've never used it, or seen any indicators that certain retailers, etc had NFC capability. What do you all think needs to happen before NFC is widely utilized?
    07-08-12 09:03 AM
  18. kbz1960's Avatar
    The first time I remember hearing about NFC was on the Nexus S which was released in January '11 IIRC. Since then it's been released on a handful of other devices. My Amaze had it. I've never used it, or seen any indicators that certain retailers, etc had NFC capability. What do you all think needs to happen before NFC is widely utilized?
    Time.............
    pantlesspenguin likes this.
    07-08-12 09:07 AM
  19. James Nieves's Avatar
    It's interesting becasue NFC still has SOO many applications that industry hasn't even explored yet. By jo they will give it time. And not to be SUPER UBER speculative but if you look at the history of NFC which dates back to 1983.. yeah 83. You'll see that we have many uses one of the MAIN benefits is that NFC can be encrypted allowing for secure connections as well.

    2004 Nokia, Philips and Sony established the Near Field Communication (NFC)Forum
    2006 Nokia 6131 was the first NFC phone
    2011 RIM is the first company for its devices to be certified by MasterCard Worldwide, the functionality of PayPass
    2012 Sony introduces the "Smart Tags", which use NFC technology to change modes and profiles on a Sony smartphone at close range, included in the package of (and "perfectly paired" with) the Sony Xperia P Smartphone released the same year

    Again Blackberry implemented NFC in a manor very very similar to Sony
    WHICH IS WHY I SPECULATE PARTNERSHIP
    But yeah NFC and Blackberry
    kbz1960 likes this.
    07-08-12 09:28 AM
  20. njblackberry's Avatar
    Your enthusiasm is admirable, but time - which is what you are saying is the answer to the question "when we NFC be commonly used" is not something RIM has. If NFC has been "around" since 1983 and is still not being widely used by anyone, then something is very wrong with the argument.
    07-08-12 09:41 AM
  21. kbz1960's Avatar
    What does Mobil oil speed pass use? There are others. It is being slowly adapted but that doesn't mean it will catch on everywhere. Myself I still pay cash for most things I buy.
    07-08-12 09:45 AM
  22. njblackberry's Avatar
    According to this site - Speedpass - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - it uses RFID.. We had one; wasn't used at enough places to warrant carrying it around.

    NFC is barely on the radar now.
    kbz1960 likes this.
    07-08-12 09:56 AM
  23. kbz1960's Avatar
    According to this site - Speedpass - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - it uses RFID.. We had one; wasn't used at enough places to warrant carrying it around.

    NFC is barely on the radar now.
    So I wonder why they all seem to be including it in the newest devices or have plans to?
    07-08-12 10:00 AM
  24. morlock_man's Avatar
    What OS is going to be running on the embedded platforms that all these near field enabled devices are going to be communicating with?

    Most likely something QNX-based.

    I can't see iOS or Android on a parking meter.
    07-08-12 10:04 AM
  25. kbz1960's Avatar
    What OS is going to be running on the embedded platforms that all these near field enabled devices are going to be communicating with?

    Most likely something QNX-based.

    I can't see iOS or Android on a parking meter.
    Won't iOS and android be able to talk to them also?
    07-08-12 10:07 AM
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