1. valorian's Avatar
    Hmmm... I didn't know these apps were even around. I knew about speed trap apps like Trapster.


    RIM bows to pressure, yanks BlackBerry DUI checkpoint app - Computerworld
    03-24-11 08:31 AM
  2. Thud Hardsmack's Avatar
    Hmmm... I didn't know these apps were even around. I knew about speed trap apps like Trapster.


    RIM bows to pressure, yanks BlackBerry DUI checkpoint app - Computerworld
    I wouldn't call it bowing to pressure. I'd call it being sensible. Vehicles are expensive to replace, people in the vehicles aren't replaceable and any inanimate object they destroy can have the replacement cost passed off to other people.

    People willing to spend a little cash on an app should have no problem forking over some cash for a cab like a responsible adult.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Chrisy likes this.
    03-24-11 11:51 AM
  3. barrist's Avatar
    if you think apple and google won't comply you're crazy.

    Apple was forced to remove the "cure yourself of being gay" app from its store after pressure. and as stupid as that app was, it's not like that was breaking any laws.

    this is a much more explicit issue.. the app is meant to circumvent traffic law
    03-24-11 12:19 PM
  4. avt123's Avatar
    It's nice knowing where the dwi checkpoints are on nights when you know there will be a lot of people driving drunk. Yes it can be used to help drunk people, but it can also be used to stay the **** away from unnecessary stops.

    I understand why they took it away, but people are going to drive intoxicated regardless. It's been going on before automobiles were even invented.
    03-24-11 01:12 PM
  5. valorian's Avatar
    I'm very much against drunk driving But, every time they post the results of these check points, they always get way more other violations (i.e no insurance, suspended license, seat belts, etc.) than they do DUIs. So what are these stops REALLY for?
    03-24-11 01:27 PM
  6. anon1611919's Avatar
    I don't even drink and get why they would pull it, but I could also see why it might be useful to someone like me who just wouldn't want to get caught up in the potential long traffic delays caused by such check points.
    03-24-11 02:29 PM
  7. avt123's Avatar
    I'm very much against drunk driving But, every time they post the results of these check points, they always get way more other violations (i.e no insurance, suspended license, seat belts, etc.) than they do DUIs. So what are these stops REALLY for?
    Exactly. They catch more people with other violations than they do that are intoxicated.

    Like I said, it is useful to stay away from unnecessary stops. I have nothing against my license and everything is up to date, but I do however like to avoid unnecessary traffic.
    03-24-11 02:43 PM
  8. theruined's Avatar
    Driving is easy while drunk - not advocating one do it, just stating opinion, trying to use Trapster while drunk may prove a bit more difficult...BUT using Trapster + driving + drunk...yea, I could see why this wasn't going to work.

    Interestingly enough though, Trapster has been around for quite a long time, wonder why they finally took it head on
    03-24-11 02:46 PM
  9. kyroguy's Avatar
    I just don't think congress has business in regulating apps inleast they are explicitly illegal. Slippery slope.

    I believe these companies should be smart enough to pull "distasteful" apps without having to be told to do so.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    03-24-11 03:33 PM
  10. DenverRalphy's Avatar
    While I won't argue the merits (or lack of) of such apps, as I could debate either side of the spectrum; Ultimately I don't support the notion of the government pressing this issue with app markets.

    Quite simply for this reason... The publishers/developers of the apps in question are not being affected all that much (if any) when it comes to distribution or sale of these apps. The apps provide a very specific function, and anybody wanting them won't hesitate to simply get them directly from the publishers/devs themselves.

    It's not like BB or Android devices are locked into only installing apps from their respective markets/app stores, we can get and install apps from anywhere we wish. Granted Apple makes it a bit of a pain to do (for very different reasons which merits it's own debate/discussion), but it's a rare creature who owns an iPhone that can't install apps from sources outside Apple's App Store.

    What I don't like is government involvement putting such pressure on the app stores. Simply because when the distribution of the apps in question are still proliferating, and the Senators who pushed for it don't get the result they wished, they'll take one more step, and if that one's not successful, then another.

    Ultimately, I'd hate to see smartphone users only able install apps from government approved/influenced app sources, and devices limited to only having apps that are deemed appropriate by someone other than the device owner. If the app itself is legal, then the govt has no business pressuring distributors as to whether they should carry said apps.


    While I don't drink and drive (and am notoriously vocal about the rising problem needing to be addressed), I have used apps like Trapster to notify me of speed traps and accident reports.
    03-24-11 08:02 PM
  11. tyro-n-tequila's Avatar
    I'm very much against drunk driving But, every time they post the results of these check points, they always get way more other violations (i.e no insurance, suspended license, seat belts, etc.) than they do DUIs. So what are these stops REALLY for?
    $$$$$$$$$$$$$
    03-24-11 08:10 PM
  12. iN8ter's Avatar
    Exactly. They catch more people with other violations than they do that are intoxicated.

    Like I said, it is useful to stay away from unnecessary stops. I have nothing against my license and everything is up to date, but I do however like to avoid unnecessary traffic.
    Agree. You don't have to do it while driving. You can just check it before you leave to make sure your usual route is free.

    Google said no thanks to this, by the way...
    03-25-11 07:46 AM
  13. avt123's Avatar
    Agree. You don't have to do it while driving. You can just check it before you leave to make sure your usual route is free.

    Google said no thanks to this, by the way...
    Exactly.

    Yea Google is keeping away from this which I am happy about. There is nothing illegal about the app, and until there is, there should be no reason to pull it.
    03-25-11 09:47 AM
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