1. BBNation's Avatar
    Qualcomm bid for BlackBerry could be tied to Certicom patents | Mobile Technology | Wireless Broadband | Wireless Carriers | RCR U.S. Wireless NewsMobile Technology | Wireless Broadband | Wireless Carriers | RCR U.S. Wireless News


    Qualcomm has emerged as a reported 11th-hour bidder for BlackBerry, which is set to go private in a $4.7 billion deal with Fairfax Financial. Qualcomm may make a bid as soon as Monday, in partnership with Cerberus Capital Management and two of BlackBerrys founders, Mike Lazaridis and Doug Fregin. Monday afternoon is the deadline for Fairfax to present a formal offer, including details on its financing. Fairfax sees value in BlackBerrys security solutions for companies and governments, but Qualcomm may be equally motivated to acquire those assets. Specifically, the cryptography technology patented by BlackBerry subsidiary Certicom could be very valuable to Qualcomm.
    Certicom provides the core technology for one of the National Security Agencys standards for secure government communications. Recently, the company has launched an asset management system tailored to the needs of chipmakers like Qualcomm. Certicom offers chip companies secure capture and reporting of multi-point yield data, secure key injection and anti-counterfeit protection. Security is increasingly important to the companies that design mobile chipsets, especially companies like Qualcomm that outsource the chip fabrication.
    Certicom says that it has more than 350 patents pending worldwide covering key aspects of elliptic curve cryptography (ECC). ECC refers to a set of algorithms generally understood to be the emerging gold standard of public key cryptography. The NSA says ECC offers greater security and more efficiency than current public key cryptology techniques, RSA and Diffie-Hellman.
    BlackBerry bought Certicom and all its patents in 2009 for just $106 million, a tiny fraction of the amount Qualcomm and its partners would need to pay in order to buy BlackBerry now. But the Certicom patents are arguably worth a lot more in todays environment than they were worth four years ago. And by adapting its security solutions to the needs of semiconductor companies, Certicom has created an asset that would be a strategic fit for Qualcomm.
    BlackBerrys device business is probably less interesting to Qualcomm, although the chipmaker does have a history in device manufacturing. In 2000 Qualcomm sold its mobile phone manufacturing business to Japans Kyocera for an undisclosed amount.
    11-04-13 12:40 AM
  2. m1kr0's Avatar
    Thanks for posting. Interesting read.
    11-04-13 02:25 AM
  3. EchuOkan1's Avatar
    Seems to be good news. Thanks.
    11-04-13 02:40 AM
  4. sixpacker's Avatar
    It's was always going to be about patents. Qc have no interest in being a handset developer, as this would seriously damage their relationship with all existing customers. Security and other tech patents would enhance their offering throughout the industry. Bbry of course would be losing one of their main unique assets.
    11-04-13 02:44 AM
  5. SirJes's Avatar
    It's was always going to be about patents. Qc have no interest in being a handset developer, as this would seriously damage their relationship with all existing customers. Security and other tech patents would enhance their offering throughout the industry. Bbry of course would be losing one of their main unique assets.
    Wouldn't damage anything, Samsung does it right? Or is QC not big enough to play the same game as Samsung?

    Posted via CB10
    Erkan OZKAYA likes this.
    11-04-13 02:57 AM
  6. trsbbs's Avatar
    Mike has never understood or liked the consumer market. He is too embedded in his little world of the elite.

    So if this happens and Mike is the same snot he has always been they will leave the consumer market and live in the enterprise world.

    If Mike has changed then it might be a good thing. But I doubt he has changed at all.



    Posted via CB10 on a Verizon Z10 running 10.2.0.1791
    11-04-13 03:47 AM
  7. sixpacker's Avatar
    Wouldn't damage anything, Samsung does it right? Or is QC not big enough to play the same game as Samsung?

    Posted via CB10
    Qc are a chipset vendor, Samsung aren't. Other customers would be very wary of their loyalties if they (part) owned bbry. We'll soon find out :-)
    11-04-13 07:33 AM
  8. birdman_38's Avatar
    Other customers would be very wary of their loyalties if they (part) owned bbry. We'll soon find out
    If that's the case, why wouldn't Qualcomm simply wait until a patent auction?
    11-04-13 08:22 AM
  9. Skeevecr's Avatar
    Qc are a chipset vendor, Samsung aren't. Other customers would be very wary of their loyalties if they (part) owned bbry. We'll soon find out :-)
    Samsung also sell their chipsets too and as far as customers being wary of their loyalties, what about google with the nexus line and their subsequent purchase of Motorola, there would be scope for QC to become more involved in this manner, albeit them only being after the patents BB have is a far more likely situation.
    11-04-13 09:14 AM
  10. kbz1960's Avatar
    Qc are a chipset vendor, Samsung aren't. Other customers would be very wary of their loyalties if they (part) owned bbry. We'll soon find out :-)
    Why would that matter? If they make chips people want to use why would it make any difference if the do or don't own bbry?
    11-04-13 09:19 AM

Similar Threads

  1. Forbes: Blackberry - should you stay or should you go?
    By kevinnugent in forum News & Rumors
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-05-13, 04:41 AM
  2. Forbes : Blackberry should you stay or go?
    By Brewer James in forum General BlackBerry Discussion
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 11-04-13, 02:34 PM
  3. BlackBerry ? The Resilient Empire
    By RafiqK in forum BlackBerry 10 OS
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-04-13, 10:43 AM
  4. unable to side load debug token
    By tahabashir1991 in forum BlackBerry Z10
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-04-13, 12:57 AM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD