1. kevinnugent's Avatar
    10-01-13 08:17 PM
  2. koool1's Avatar
    I agree. BlackBerry can not let W8 phones get any kind of major enterprise or government traction or its game over. The retail consumer is likely a lost cause for BlackBerry for the most part but enterprise can continue to be a good niche if they can hold on.

    Posted via CB10
    10-01-13 08:57 PM
  3. Bold_until_Hybrid_Comes's Avatar
    Thanks for posting kev
    10-01-13 08:59 PM
  4. danprown's Avatar
    good article, but the biggest threat is the interal schism, the lack of focus, egos, all overseen traditionally by a board of "Toronto establishment" small, provincial nobodies.
    10-01-13 09:05 PM
  5. kevinnugent's Avatar
    I'm kinda surprised that Microsoft haven't thrown their hat over Blackberry to be honest. It's chicken feed for them, and they get to kill assimilate integrate them for very cheap.
    FSeverino likes this.
    10-01-13 09:26 PM
  6. Warcony's Avatar
    I'd probably laugh if I ever saw windows phone in the enterprise world. They look like they are for kids. But still, BlackBerry has got to watch out!

    Posted via CB10 on the lovely Q10!
    10-01-13 09:30 PM
  7. grumpyaeroguy's Avatar
    Well, if my companies IT insiders are any gauge, and they may not be, MS hasn't made many friends around our company lately.

    The c_ap they are doing/trying ref. licensing fees ref Windows and Office are, well, "out there". Things like: Well, you design/produce these "widgets" using, to some degree, (legally purchased/licensed) versions of, say, Excel. We want a cut of the profits of these wid gets as a license fee for using our software for this "stuff". As anyone could predict, that went over like a lead balloon.

    As a matter of fact, some years ago, right as Win7 was gaining traction and MS first threatened to stop supporting XP (which was in our enterprise at that time), there was a pilot program (which I participated in) to see if OpenOffice was a viable alternative to MS office. Turns out that that OpenOffice was NOT practical for many reasons (as we are a technology company) due largly to the sheer amount of legacy, excel based, automated, tools. The programming interface of OpenOffice just wouldn't cut it (at the time). Not sure if that has come around in the mean time.

    At first glance --- of course, that seemed a crazy notion. On the other hand, it cost the company a significant amount of money to pilot it. THAT'S HOW PI$$ED FOLKS WERE THERE WITH MS.

    All I'm saying, MS has burned some bridges with enterprise users trying "innovative" ways to structure licensing fees. It may not be just throwing money at it and marching into a companies office and saying, "Here we are --- use our enterprise device management".

    Just another perspective.
    richardat likes this.
    10-01-13 09:36 PM
  8. 12Danny123's Avatar
    This is gonna get nasty. But as a tech giant. Microsoft is gonna win overall. They killed Blackberry massively when they updated ActiveSync and exchange. They could do something like that again to them
    10-01-13 10:08 PM
  9. fin2007's Avatar
    do not believe it.
    In the end, it will still be IOS/Andriod ruling enterprise market.

    I see all the software companies in Bay Area(you know where it is) always develop their mobile client Applications on iOS first right now, occasionally on Andriod, no MSFT/BBRY.
    10-01-13 10:10 PM
  10. RH1Pearl's Avatar
    BlackBerry's biggest threat is its management. Fire the heads and get forward thinking people in there with salaries tied to performance, not layoff fee of $55m
    10-01-13 10:15 PM
  11. kevinnugent's Avatar
    For those people who don't think Microsoft is a threat: Ars Technica are not fools.....


    Paint it black: Why BlackBerry is the next Novell | Ars Technica

    Paint it black: Why BlackBerry is the next Novell
    Z10's failure to launch consigns BlackBerry to a niche future—maybe minus phones.
    by Sean Gallagher - Oct 3 2013, 6:00am +1000

    FinanceWireless59
    A glut of Z10 phones cost BlackBerry nearly $1 billion. Now, it prepares to sell itself.
    Casey Johnston We knew things were hard for BlackBerry and that this was going to be a harsh year for the company that practically invented the "smartphone" business. But the cold shoulder that BlackBerry's new handsets have received—its Z10 touchscreen phone in particular—now comes with a price tag that seems to seal the company's fate.

    That price tag, called the "Z10 Inventory Charge," is $934 million—the vast majority of the approximately $1 billion in losses that the company reported in an SEC filing yesterday. The bad news may complicate the $4.7 billion bid made for the company by Canadian private equity firm Fairfax Holdings, which is pending based on a look at BlackBerry's books. And with phone sales off by nearly a billion dollars from the same period last year, it's possible that the flop of the Z10 will lead to BlackBerry's exit from the cell phone business.

    The company has already said that it plans to move away from the consumer market entirely, focusing on the "enterprise and prosumer market" and "end-to-end solutions." Given that the software business—and BlackBerry Enterprise Service 10 in particular—is about the only thing bringing in a positive cash flow at BlackBerry, that may be the company's only choice going forward if the go-private deal collapses.

    We've written off BlackBerry before. But given the company's precarious position as it prepares for a sale, it's increasingly doubtful BlackBerry will emerge from this year in a form that even vaguely resembles the company that changed its name from Research In Motion at the beginning of this year. As if to prove how hard off BlackBerry is, a rumor that Cerberus Capital Management (the same "distressed asset" investment firm that oversaw the death spiral of Chrysler after it was cut loose from Daimler-Benz) was interested in looking at BlackBerry's books today caused BlackBerry's stock price to spike upward, though far short of the $9 a share Fairfax has offered.

    Withering on the bush
    For those who have been fans of the BlackBerry—and I count myself among them, despite some of the pessimistic things I've said about the company—the Z10's failure to gain traction is just another in a series of unfortunate product launches that date back to the late jump into the tablet market with the PlayBook. But the Z10 launch makes the PlayBook failure pale in comparison, if only because so much of the company's future was bet on the BlackBerry 10 launch.

    That bet included shipping mass quantities of its new BlackBerry 10 handsets to phone carriers and retailers in the hope that the long-promised launch would bring BlackBerry's faithful customers running in for an upgrade. But as the company admitted in its SEC filing yesterday, once the phones were on the market for a few months, "the sell-through levels for BlackBerry 10 smartphones decreased… due to the maturing smartphone market and very intense competition."

    Of course, if you're in the market for a cheap touchscreen handset, the Z10 flop may be your gain. BlackBerry is planning on "re-targeting" the Z10 as an entry-level handset for a "broader" set of customers. In other words, the company will be selling $934 million worth of the phones at fire-sale prices.

    BlackBerry actually blames itself for some of the harsher-than-expected competition, claiming that delays in the release of features for BlackBerry Enterprise Service 10 kept business customers from committing to the new phones early. BES 10, the company's enterprise security and management platform, didn't ship until just before the release of the Z10. BlackBerry's analysis seems to be that while enterprise customers (that the company could have counted on in the past to scoop up boatloads of new handsets) were waiting, many of them got impatient and jumped ship to Android or Apple or just sat on their hands and waited for things to play out.

    But BlackBerry also had moved to make BES 10 compatible with Android and iOS phones in an effort to shore up the software business against an onslaught of other mobile device management platforms. That may have actually added to the Z10's woes, as organizations decided to take advantage of that new functionality with someone else's phones.

    The incredible shrinking business model
    As it turns out, BES 10 is one of the few bright spots in BlackBerry's overall business. If anything, BlackBerry's software has kept the company's hardware business from being totally annihilated up until now. The move to make BES and the BBM messaging platform open to other phone platforms may make them a viable, but much smaller, business unto themselves—which is why BlackBerry has moved to make BBM an independent subsidiary. But without the differentiation provided by BES and BBM, the only thing that BlackBerry has left to hang hopes for a handset business on is the "end-to-end solutions" pitch. And there's someone much bigger with more cash that is moving into that business with them: Microsoft.

    Microsoft's move to acquire Nokia's phone business isn't just part of a move to become a consumer products company. The deal also puts Microsoft in a position to offer end-to-end management from server to desktop to tablet to handset through its System Center tools. And it gives the company the ability to offer mobile hardware optimized to work in the Microsoft enterprise ecosystem without having to invest in another management platform.

    That's bad news for BlackBerry. Most of BlackBerry's customers already have licenses for Microsoft management tools; if Microsoft can do 80 percent of what BES and BlackBerry 10 can do for enterprise customers in terms of mobile device management and security, that will be incentive enough for them to move away from BES and the BlackBerry platform entirely and consider Windows Phone instead of BlackBerry 10.

    In other words, Microsoft is hoping to leverage the same economics that it used to take over corporate networks, dislodging Novell. And BlackBerry is looking a lot like the Novell of mobile—a distressed platform that niche customers cling to because of that one feature they need to fulfill a very specific business mandate. That may be a recipe for survival as a private company, but it isn't exactly a path to recovery.

    .
    techvisor, anon1727506 and Etios like this.
    10-02-13 10:43 PM
  12. kfh227's Avatar
    Msft and android will be 1/2

    Eventually, apple will die.

    And Msft will probably eat what is left of bbry's cake. I really want msft to buy bbry.

    Posted via CB10
    10-02-13 10:55 PM
  13. 12Danny123's Avatar
    Msft and android will be 1/2

    Eventually, apple will die.

    And Msft will probably eat what is left of bbry's cake. I really want msft to buy bbry.

    Posted via CB10


    The problem for blackberry is. What's the point of Microsoft buying Blackberry? That's a question tones of people and the media are questioning. Most likely for patents. But definitely nothing else
    10-03-13 12:56 AM
  14. Thunderbuck's Avatar
    The problem for blackberry is. What's the point of Microsoft buying Blackberry? That's a question tones of people and the media are questioning. Most likely for patents. But definitely nothing else
    BES would be handy for Microsoft to be able to sell. There's quite a bit you can do with Exchange Active Sync, but it doesn't have anywhere near the power over the actual device that BES offers.
    kfh227 likes this.
    10-03-13 12:59 AM
  15. cgk's Avatar
    BES would be handy for Microsoft to be able to sell. There's quite a bit you can do with Exchange Active Sync, but it doesn't have anywhere near the power over the actual device that BES offers.
    Culturally MS can't and will not believe that - that is why a concentration purely on balance sheets and tech specs misses how the internal dynamic of how a company runs and decisions are made. So they might hoover up some patents in a break-up sale but they would never support or sell BES - completely against what they stand for.
    BB_Bmore likes this.
    10-03-13 01:06 AM
  16. fin2007's Avatar
    Culturally MS can't and will not believe that - that is why a concentration purely on balance sheets and tech specs misses how the internal dynamic of how a company runs and decisions are made. So they might hoover up some patents in a break-up sale but they would never support or sell BES - completely against what they stand for.
    can MSFT add BES server as an additional module as their exchange server? I know that is how big software companies make money on top of their base software like database/OS/Virtual Server.
    10-03-13 01:19 AM
  17. Thunderbuck's Avatar
    can MSFT add BES server as an additional module as their exchange server? I know that is how big software companies make money on top of their base software like database/OS/Virtual Server.
    I think Microsoft would sell BES as an Exchange-focused MDM product, and of course they'd have a client written for Windows Phone as quick as humanly possible. Yes, I think it would be very valuable.
    10-03-13 02:51 PM
  18. anon1727506's Avatar
    Msft and android will be 1/2

    Eventually, apple will die.

    And Msft will probably eat what is left of bbry's cake. I really want msft to buy bbry.

    Posted via CB10
    I think MS will grow to a strong mobile platform competitor. with office, true mobile computing i can see some advantages

    Android... not sure what they really offer in the long run other that always having the newest hardware at decent prices.

    Apple The size of their ecosystem, the quality of their ecosystem (Android can't touch some of the apps there), and just the sheer number of very happy and devoted customers. And the fact that they have more money that the US treasury... they aren't going anywhere.

    Google is a little like Dell, they are selling a commodity item and it's all about the hardware specs for most of their customers. At some point mobile is going to reach a point where advancement in hardware specs isn't going to mean anything (pretty close to that point now). If Apple released a 5" smartphone and sold it at cost for a year.... would it hurt them in some way??? Does Google have customers that are so loyal that they would still buy an HTC or Samsung 5" device for the same price?
    10-03-13 04:00 PM
  19. rodan01's Avatar
    BES would be handy for Microsoft to be able to sell. There's quite a bit you can do with Exchange Active Sync, but it doesn't have anywhere near the power over the actual device that BES offers.
    Windows Intune is for device management.

    What is Windows Intune? PC and mobile device management cloud solution
    10-03-13 04:02 PM
  20. Taigatrommel's Avatar
    My previous company was, or rather is still looking for a new mobile computing solution. As of now all employees are eqipped with two year old Symbian^3 devices by Nokia. The race was initially between three horses: Apple, Android and Windows Phone. Apple got ruled out rather quickly, due to the fact the devices are simply the most expensive ones, especially when looking at a price/performance ratio.
    Just two or three months ago, they started considering BB10. However ever since BBRY mentioned their strategy change, strengthened by poor financials, they quickly dropped these plans. They don't want to invest any money on a boat which might not be afloat anymore sometime next year.

    So ATM they're deciding between Android and Windows Phone. Both have decent, cheap devices. Windows Phone is favoured because it actually should be integrated more flawlessley into the existing, already Microsoft heavy IT structure. In addition Windows Phone is rather easy and simple to use, which should make staff training faster. The "cheap" looking devices are not of any concern. Take a matte black back-cover for a Lumia 520: It doesn't look any cheaper than comparing it to cheaper BBRY Curves.

    Posted via the awesome Blackberry Q10
    10-04-13 02:18 AM
  21. cgk's Avatar
    It's interesting that in one of his interviews, Heins said that Nokia wasn't a serious competitor because they were handsets only and had no services place.

    There is talk this morning that MSFT might drop the WP license fee entirely - that actually makes a lot of sense, MSFT's revenue is (off the top of my head) 55% driven by enterprise so they can afford to do that in order to capture more and more of the enterprise space.

    As for the MDM stuff, while it is technically feasible, I just can't see it for the cultural reasons I mentioned earlier - plus BBRY's whole customer base is small fry compared to MSFT - yes they have the secure customers but as far as I am aware they don't pay any more than a regular customer, so the advantage is minimum in a revenue sense.
    10-04-13 02:25 AM
  22. 12Danny123's Avatar
    Agree with cgk. Microsoft and HTC are apparently in talks about dropping the fee and probably producing WP versions of their flagships. and even dual boot WP and Android on them. Revolutionary. If OEMs dual boot android and windows phone. Then apple and especially blackberry is screwed. WP and android will dominate together if they this
    10-04-13 03:13 AM
  23. jegs2's Avatar
    Of course, if you're in the market for a cheap touchscreen handset, the Z10 flop may be your gain. BlackBerry is planning on "re-targeting" the Z10 as an entry-level handset for a "broader" set of customers. In other words, the company will be selling $934 million worth of the phones at fire-sale prices.
    Well, if they do that with the Q-10, I may upgrade my 9930 after all.
    10-04-13 07:29 AM

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