01-19-20 02:07 AM
113 ... 345
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  1. towngirl's Avatar
    Damn... there is ONE button ..Don't know what it is...keeps making me lose my post. ...every freaking day.

    Anyway...long story short. Not steaming. Wi-Fi cost money, where I live.

    Give me an SD card and I will be happy. Not paying to store on icloud or other. And Google sucks.
    01-16-20 10:04 PM
  2. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    Damn... there is ONE button ..Don't know what it is...keeps making me lose my post. ...every freaking day.

    Anyway...long story short. Not steaming. Wi-Fi cost money, where I live.

    Give me an SD card and I will be happy. Not paying to store on icloud or other. And Google sucks.
    Hey there... ;-D
    01-16-20 10:13 PM
  3. towngirl's Avatar
    Don't make me swear at you lol
    01-16-20 10:15 PM
  4. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    Don't make me swear at you lol
    I didn’t even get to use a pickup line...
    01-16-20 10:16 PM
  5. towngirl's Avatar
    I didn’t even get to use a pickup line...
    I knew you probably deserved it so why wait. lol
    01-16-20 10:30 PM
  6. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    I knew you probably deserved it so why wait. lol
    I love it when you’re like that .....
    01-16-20 10:36 PM
  7. towngirl's Avatar
    I love it when you’re like that .....
    Great. If you don't like it, there will be more dismemberment bodies and probably not mine, but yours
    01-16-20 10:44 PM
  8. goku_vegeta's Avatar
    bring a regular android (googled and non-googled) to market with hub suite installed, are not unfounded.
    Yeah, depending on how long the licensing agreement will continue for, this might happen.


    Blackberry may be working with google to better integrated gmail apps and GSuite.
    Android BlackBerry devices are already running Android... There's not really much you can do to "integrate" them more considering the fact that Android, and Google's first party apps, are designed to run well with that operating system, irrespective if it's on a BlackBerry (TCL) branded device or not.

    They are trying to intergrate Google Keep with Blackberry Notes.
    We saw pretty much early on, over four years ago now, with the Priv that BlackBerry has opted to go with Google's first party apps when possible. So while BlackBerry Notes might eventually get some support for syncing with Google Keep, I'd doubt it considering (to my knowledge) there is no public API for Keep and I doubt Google would have much benefit partnering with BlackBerry on this one.

    integrating hub with Evernote.
    So there was previously BlackBerry Remember which was integrated with Evernote. I actually enjoyed it, I liked being able to use the native Remember app and have all of that information sync with Evernote, although I don't see how this would work with BlackBerry Hub, unless you're referring to perhaps the productivity tab and having tasks become integrated or sync with Google Tasks/Keep?
    01-16-20 11:16 PM
  9. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    I'm a mobile DJ, so it's required that I have the actual music files for the music I play, as I work in a lot of venues (including the backyard of large homes) where there is no WiFi and no cell signal.

    I spent the last 4 years re-ripping all of my music into FLACs, with embedded 512x512 album art and complete tags. I converted most of the collection to 320k MP3s for portable use and widest compatibility, but I can easily access my FLACs without having to pull out the physical CDs again. Some of my oldest MP3s were 128k that I ripped back in the 90s, so it was nice to replace them finally - and even nicer that flash storage has caught up so that I can carry my collection on a microSD card.
    320K MP3 vs FLAC.... it's hard to really tell the difference. But the 128K vs 320K even my old ears can tell the difference, which is why those old Napster downloads are not the pride and joy that they once were.

    And I'm sure you know that streaming, doesn't always mean you have to have a connection. Many services allow you to download content, but yes it's got to be played with their app - so not a professional solution like you need. The big plus for me, is access to not so mainstream content...

    I was just pointing out that some of Apple's limitations, are not the issue today that they once were. I remember FLAC use to not be supported on iPhones either.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    01-17-20 08:59 AM
  10. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    I'm not sure if FLAC is supported on iPhones even today. Apple, of course, has their own proprietary lossless format: ALAC. Because Apple.

    Anyway, I decided if I was going to do all that work of ripping and tagging and hunting down high-quality artwork (in many case having to edit it from less-perfect artwork), that I was going to use FLACs, which are easily converted with all of the metadata included to other formats (like 320k MP3s) for purposes when FLACs aren't suitable. Given the low cost of storage today, it was a very good decision.
    01-17-20 11:31 AM
  11. conite's Avatar
    I'm not sure if FLAC is supported on iPhones even today. Apple, of course, has their own proprietary lossless format: ALAC. Because Apple.

    Anyway, I decided if I was going to do all that work of ripping and tagging and hunting down high-quality artwork (in many case having to edit it from less-perfect artwork), that I was going to use FLACs, which are easily converted with all of the metadata included to other formats (like 320k MP3s) for purposes when FLACs aren't suitable. Given the low cost of storage today, it was a very good decision.
    All of my music is Flac now. I won't touch anything else. I don't find Flac HD (96/24 or 192/24) worth it though. I have good ears, but I just can't tell the difference even with great equipment.

    I can only justify it if it came from recording an analog source like vinyl.
    01-17-20 11:52 AM
  12. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    Hi-Rez audio (for already-mastered music) is pointless - and this is coming from an Audio Engineering grad. It's useful for making original recordings, when you're going to be converting to and from digital multiple times along the way, and layering effects and so forth, because the various effects can be affected by the higher frequencies and it's theoretically better to have a higher bitrate, but once the music has been mastered, there's literally no point. The CD audio standard wasn't created just to be "good enough" due to limitations in tech, it was chosen by audio scientists after a lot of research and chosen independently of the development of the CD.

    There are lots of resources on the net that talk about this. Yes, there were problems in the early years of digital that resulted in less than great results:

    - early CD players only had 14-bit DACs due to lack of processing power
    - mastering engineers had some trouble understanding how to master for CD properly, and many early CD masters into the early 90s had issues.
    - engineers who were used to analog tape were used to turning up the highs to overcome the limits of the tape, and as they transitioned to digital recordings (over a 20 year period, as digital gradually replaced analog), they tended to maintain that habit until either they figured out the problem or someone pointed it out to them, but a lot of digital recordings into the 90s were overly harsh for this reason, and mastering engineers have had to remaster some of those recordings to fix it. Virtually everyone now understands to record the music "flat" instead of with boosted highs as was common in the analog days, though now we have the opposite problem: engineers will do a project using analog tape and record it flat, and the tape sounds dead because the highs are rolled off.

    But as multiple-award-winning engineer/mixer Bob Clearmountain would tell you, digital unquestionably has higher quality than analog - but you have to know not to use analog workarounds when using it - and that despite original studio recordings being hi-res, it makes no sense to use hi-res on a mastered recording, because you just can't hear the difference.

    And the reason LPs can sound different is for similar reasons: it's an analog format with known limitations that are compensated for (as much as possible) by the mastering engineer, who will have to change the EQing, sum the low frequencies to mono, add sometimes add additional compression, as compared to the "studio master". There's also the fact that vinyl is encoded with sloped frequency response (louder highs and softer lows) which is reversed by the turntable pre-amp - but not perfectly. People might enjoy these alterations, but it's not what the master tapes actually sound like. Nothing will sound closer to the original master tape than a properly-mastered CD, with higher bitrates not making a difference.
    01-17-20 09:28 PM
  13. Bbnivende's Avatar
    That was really informative.Thanks Troy.
    01-19-20 02:07 AM
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