03-13-15 11:23 AM
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  1. serbanescu's Avatar
    Blackberry CEO: 'We upgraded everything' - Video - Technology

    Richard Quest (the interviewer) proves to be a great BlackBerry fan
    03-04-15 12:57 PM
  2. Gatmyer's Avatar
    Richard Quest is hilarious!

    Posted via CB10
    03-04-15 01:01 PM
  3. tinochiko's Avatar
    Nicee

    Check Out TechCraze
    03-04-15 01:03 PM
  4. edwinsberry's Avatar
    A lot of people seem to not like JC when he is in the media, but I do. He comes over as sincere. I hope he succeeds with this device.
    03-04-15 01:06 PM
  5. Gatmyer's Avatar
    "I don't know what sexy is, Not at my age"


    Lol

    Posted via CB10
    Lacker20 likes this.
    03-04-15 01:07 PM
  6. birdman_38's Avatar
    Those were actually really good questions on the part of the interviewer. Sad that he had to admit he carries two devices.
    03-04-15 01:07 PM
  7. birdman_38's Avatar
    A lot of people seem to not like JC when he is in the media, but I do. He comes over as sincere.
    Except for when he said he listened to his customers. Obviously he ignored the desires of BlackBerry's customers in this community.
    Maxxxpower and walt63 like this.
    03-04-15 01:09 PM
  8. tinochiko's Avatar
    Except for when he said he listened to his customers. Obviously he ignored the desires of BlackBerry's customers in this community.
    Not u customer, enterprise customers

    Check Out TechCraze
    03-04-15 01:10 PM
  9. edwinsberry's Avatar
    Except for when he said he listened to his customers. Obviously he ignored the desires of BlackBerry's customers in this community.
    Yes, I think it is a given at this point that the direction is how to make Enterprise successful. Any consumer participation at this point is a by product, but given the situation that is all I can expect. I still like the products I'm seeing overall. Not so much the LEAP but the enterprise space seems to have that need.
    03-04-15 01:20 PM
  10. bicyclexpress's Avatar
    Those were some good questions. One of the problems for BlackBerry is that the line between consumer and enterprise is remarkably thin. I feel like that distinction is getting blurred more and more every day.

    Posted via CB10
    03-04-15 01:44 PM
  11. ccbs's Avatar
    Those were some good questions. One of the problems for BlackBerry is that the line between consumer and enterprise is remarkably thin. I feel like that distinction is getting blurred more and more every day.

    Posted via CB10
    Well, it is certainly very distinct in term of the sale channel, where enterprises make contact directly with carrier and BBRY to make large volume deployment, instead of going to carrier shop to try and make phone purchase. Meanwhile, it is easier to have a focus target, for instances John Chen and his team can get in touch with the CTOs to know what they are after instead of trying to read the finicky consumer market trend.
    There are much less work to do, less resources to waste in focusing on one segment. BBRY has certainly tried and failed to venture into the consumer market. BBRY then tried to then focus on prosumer market and eventually failed. It is best use of their resources now to be focused and build up their image as a EMM solution provider, with secure handset solution.
    03-04-15 02:57 PM
  12. newfie1974's Avatar
    Every time i see Chen i want to shake his hand. It's going to be a sad day when he moves on.
    03-04-15 03:06 PM
  13. edwinsberry's Avatar
    Well, it is certainly very distinct in term of the sale channel, where enterprises make contact directly with carrier and BBRY to make large volume deployment, instead of going to carrier shop to try and make phone purchase. Meanwhile, it is easier to have a focus target, for instances John Chen and his team can get in touch with the CTOs to know what they are after instead of trying to read the finicky consumer market trend.
    When I see what Chen does and says I think you have it right with why this is where it is going. He wants to drive revenue now and he will try to do it where it makes some sense, and maybe when it doesn't. In a way he is throwing whatever he has against the wall to see if it sticks but knows where the focus is and where he should spend BB efforts.
    03-04-15 04:03 PM
  14. Jtaylor1986's Avatar
    I think they were talking about the Classic the whole time not the Leap. Interview didn't make sense otherwise.
    03-04-15 05:59 PM
  15. MarsupilamiX's Avatar
    Those were some good questions. One of the problems for BlackBerry is that the line between consumer and enterprise is remarkably thin. I feel like that distinction is getting blurred more and more every day.

    Posted via CB10
    What blurs the lines the most are apps and MDM solutions.
    You can make every consumer phone an enterprise device with those 2 things.
    LuvULongTime and eldricho like this.
    03-04-15 06:11 PM
  16. RubberChicken76's Avatar
    Except for when he said he listened to his customers. Obviously he ignored the desires of BlackBerry's customers in this community.

    We are not "the typical user" and we need to stop assuming we are.

    For the most part, the people here are power users. They have a vested interest in technology, follow it closely, love to discuss and debate it. The fact that people who post even come to a site called "CrackBerry.com" skews things. So does the fact that it's a site with english only content.

    We may actually only represent demographically a teeny segment of BlackBerrys tens of millions of users.

    Saying "John Chen doesn't listen to his customers" is ridiculous. Unless you have some inside understanding of the customer visits they do and don't do; the surveys they do and don't do; the research they do and don't commissions; the usability tests they do and don't do etc.

    Call it what it is: You're not personally happy with how he listens to the requests of specific posters on a fan-site called "CrackBerry.com".

    Said a different way ... ask anyone you know with an iPhone if they post on the iMore forums. I very few will say they do and slightly more than that may have even heard of iMore.
    03-04-15 06:26 PM
  17. anon(8865116)'s Avatar
    Personally, I thought the ending could have been better said. I think Chen has some dry humor but I think it can easily be lost on a lot of people. I would answer it like a politician, appease the most people, but have a slant one way or another. EG - You know, a lot of people think our devices are sexy in their own way. We definitely take pride in designing our devices in an attractive way but we always focus on security and functionality first.
    03-04-15 07:05 PM
  18. MarsupilamiX's Avatar
    We are not "the typical user" and we need to stop assuming we are.

    For the most part, the people here are power users. They have a vested interest in technology, follow it closely, love to discuss and debate it. The fact that people who post even come to a site called "CrackBerry.com" skews things. So does the fact that it's a site with english only content.

    We may actually only represent demographically a teeny segment of BlackBerrys tens of millions of users.

    Saying "John Chen doesn't listen to his customers" is ridiculous. Unless you have some inside understanding of the customer visits they do and don't do; the surveys they do and don't do; the research they do and don't commissions; the usability tests they do and don't do etc.

    Call it what it is: You're not personally happy with how he listens to the requests of specific posters on a fan-site called "CrackBerry.com".

    Said a different way ... ask anyone you know with an iPhone if they post on the iMore forums. I very few will say they do and slightly more than that may have even heard of iMore.
    Huh?
    99.9% of smartphone users buy all touch by now.
    Most of the phones sold in the "developed" world, are higher mid-tier to flagship phones.

    There is no question if the decision to not launch a flagship touch device was incredibly stupid.
    There is also no debate about consumer buying preferences or focus groups.
    Everyone buys full touch. Emerging markets buy cheaper phones, with a new trend showing that they start to buy from local manufacturers more. While "developed" countries buy full touch, from basically everyone, as long as the phones are better than the midrange (economic constraints aren't a major issue, because of the way phone contracts and subsidies work "here").

    It's pretty simple, to be honest:
    Neither did John Chen listen to his customers, nor to potential customers, with the exception of the Leap. The Leap is definitely an enterprise fleet phone with bulk purchasing discounts. Everything else though, has absolutely nothing to do with buyer preferences.
    Sliders are even less liked than keyboard phones... And "Nobody" likes those already.
    Last edited by MarsupilamiX; 03-05-15 at 03:43 AM.
    dehdude and mikeo007 like this.
    03-04-15 08:05 PM
  19. lotuslanderz's Avatar
    Those were actually really good questions on the part of the interviewer. Sad that he had to admit he carries two devices.
    If he has an iPhone, why does he need a BlackBerry?

    Posted via CB10
    03-05-15 03:20 AM
  20. anon(8865116)'s Avatar
    Huh?
    99.9% of smartphone users buy all touch by now.
    Most of the phones sold in the "developed" world, are higher mid-tier to flagship phones.

    There is no question if the decision to not launch a flagship touch device was incredibly stupid.
    There is also no debate about consumer buying preferences or focus groups.
    Everyone buys full touch. Emerging markets buy cheaper phones, with a new trend showing that they start to buy from local manufacturers more. While "developed" countries buy full touch, from basically everyone, as long as the phones are better than the midrange (economic constraints aren't a major issue, because of the way phone contracts and subsidies work "here").

    It's pretty simple, to be honest:
    Neither did John Chen listen to his customers, nor to potential customers, with the exception of the Leap. The Leap is definitely an enterprise fleet phone with bulk purchasing discounts. Everything else though, has absolutely nothing to do with buyer preferences.
    Sliders are even less liked than keyboard phones... And "Nobody" likes those already.

    I agree with a lot of what you said but the torch was pretty popular back in the day. Not sure why blackberry keeps trying to appeal to nostalgia but if it sells 2 million devices or more, so be it. If we're not shooting for devices popular with the masses you might as well stick to your loyal fan group and just make sure your operating costs are below your revenue for the device.
    03-05-15 09:03 AM
  21. MarsupilamiX's Avatar
    I agree with a lot of what you said but the torch was pretty popular back in the day. Not sure why blackberry keeps trying to appeal to nostalgia but if it sells 2 million devices or more, so be it. If we're not shooting for devices popular with the masses you might as well stick to your loyal fan group and just make sure your operating costs are below your revenue for the device.
    In the fear of sounding schizophrenic...

    I personally will hoard some units of that slider phone.
    I absolutely adore the form factor.
    So when I say "nobody", I try to be objective and look at the statistical evidence.

    Which doesn't mean that I do not agree with you. There should be a slider enthusiast market out there. At the end of this year, there probably will be over 3 billion smartphones sold in the world. So there should be enough people out there who want one.

    But if I have the choice between 2 possibilities, between a world where BlackBerry only launches the slider, or a world in which BlackBerry launches a slider and a full touch flagship, I think that it's a no-brainer to opt for the second possibility.
    And that's all the gripes I have with the slider on a theoretical basis.
    It makes no sense to not have a touch phone accompanying the device, with the same exact specs, minus the sliding part.
    Last edited by MarsupilamiX; 03-05-15 at 05:14 PM.
    03-05-15 09:44 AM
  22. birdman_38's Avatar
    If he has an iPhone, why does he need a BlackBerry?
    That's a good question. And now with BB10 cross platform software coming out by 2016, it becomes even more relevant.
    03-05-15 09:44 AM
  23. RubberChicken76's Avatar
    Huh?
    99.9% of smartphone users buy all touch by now.
    Sure. And BlackBerry had to write down a billion dollars worth of the one that they launched with in 2013. Not sure why people have a hard time with this ...

    People assume "Chen hates touch screens".

    When he joined, had more than enough in the warehouse to get rid of, and his predecessor just launched another model. Still, he launched the Z3, just announced the leap.

    And while 99% of smartphone users are touch screen users, 99% of BlackBerry users are not. They need to launch both (and have) ... plain and simple.
    03-05-15 10:42 AM
  24. dehdude's Avatar
    Sure. And BlackBerry had to write down a billion dollars worth of the one that they launched with in 2013. Not sure why people have a hard time with this ...

    People assume "Chen hates touch screens".

    When he joined, had more than enough in the warehouse to get rid of, and his predecessor just launched another model. Still, he launched the Z3, just announced the leap.

    And while 99% of smartphone users are touch screen users, 99% of BlackBerry users are not. They need to launch both (and have) ... plain and simple.
    Except the z10 was the best selling BB10 device.
    I can guarantee the number of BB10 touch users and is far greater than keyboard phones as it stands currently, and that trend is only growing.
    Can't comment on the amount of times that people here (bb enthusiast that may be more skewed towards pkb) have already said they will not return to it after using a slab.

    Even if everything I said above is wrong, which it isin't, how crazy can Chen be to ignore an entire (perhaps the largest) segment of the market AND existing customers who are ready now for an upgrade cycle. Business 101, keep your user base first then grow.

    Absolutely baffling.
    03-05-15 01:43 PM
  25. BCITMike's Avatar
    Except the z10 was the best selling BB10 device.
    I can guarantee the number of BB10 touch users and is far greater than keyboard phones as it stands currently, and that trend is only growing.
    Can't comment on the amount of times that people here (bb enthusiast that may be more skewed towards pkb) have already said they will not return to it after using a slab.

    Even if everything I said above is wrong, which it isin't, how crazy can Chen be to ignore an entire (perhaps the largest) segment of the market AND existing customers who are ready now for an upgrade cycle. Business 101, keep your user base first then grow.

    Absolutely baffling.
    Best selling at full price, or at $199 and major loss? There's a major difference to BlackBerry.

    Posted via CB10
    03-05-15 02:43 PM
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