1. Lostboy5151's Avatar
    Net neutrality is the principle that Internet service providers and governments regulating the Internet should treat all data on the Internet the same, not discriminating or charging deferentially by user, content, website, platform, application, type of attached equipment, or mode of communication.
    AND SO IT BEGINS.
    Two weeks after voting to preserve the open Internet, the Federal Communications Commission finally released a 400 page document detailing the new rules in all their glory.
    Net neutrality is the idea that all traffic on the Internet should be treated equally. That means your broadband provider, which controls your access to the Internet, can't block or slow down the services or applications you use over the Web. It also means your Internet service provider -- whether it's a cable company or telephone service - can't create so-called fast lanes that force content companies like Netflix to pay an additional fee to deliver their content to customers faster.
    Even though it appears most people agree with the basic premise of Net neutrality, the FCC's rules have become a lightning rod for controversy. The reason: The FCC has now reclassified broadband as a so-called Title II telecommunications service under the 1934 Communications Act. That reclassification places broadband providers under the same regulations that now govern telephone networks.
    Broadband providers, like AT&T and Comcast, say Title II allows the FCC to impose higher rates and will discourage them from building or upgrading their networks. On the flip side, Title II will help the FCC fight any legal challenges that AT&T, Verizon and Comcast (among others) throw its way.
    The FCC's Net neutrality order boils down to three key rules:
    No Blocking. Simply put: A broadband provider can't block lawful content, applications, services or non harmful devices.
    No Throttling. The FCC created a separate rule that prohibits broadband providers from slowing down specific applications or services, a practice known as throttling. More to the point, the FCC said providers can't single out Internet traffic based on who sends it, where it's going, what the content happens to be or whether that content competes with the provider's business.
    No Paid Prioritization. A broadband provider cannot accept fees for favored treatment. In short, the rules prohibit Internet fast lanes.
    Beyond that, the FCC said of the 400 page document,they needed to give detailed explanations of how and why they wrote these rules, because they expect the rules will be challenged in court. That's because the FCC's two previous attempts were thrown out of court for improper legal justification. AT&T and Comcast have already hinted they will sue the FCC over the rules and, in particular, their reclassification as broadband services.
    The big question on everyone's mind?? Is the government taking over the Internet?
    These new rules don't regulate any content or application on the Internet, or dictate how the Internet operates or where traffic is routed. So in that sense, the answer is no. They do regulate access to the "last mile" of the Internet, which is the network that connects your home or mobile device to the Net.This means the rules govern just the companies and the sections of their networks that deliver Internet access to consumers. Companies subject to the regulation are broadband providers, like AT&T, Verizon or Comcast, which sell consumers fixed or wireless access to the Internet.
    Additionally, the agency is applying parts of sections that protect consumers, promote competition and "advance universal access, all of which will foster network investment, thereby helping to promote broadband deployment."
    Section 222, for instance, protects consumer privacy. Sections 225/255/251(a)(2) ensure broadband access to people with disabilities. The agency also kept section 224, which requires utilities to give cable system operators and telecommunications carriers access to their poles so they can attach their own wires for service.

    This current FCC may be forbearing most Title II provisions, but could a future FCC change that?
    In theory yes. But FCC officials said that it's not that easy. That's one reason the FCC spelled out its rationale in a 400 page document. With it, the agency creates a record that could be used to prevent future iterations of the FCC from undoing everything,
    And keep in mind that the FCC has to follow procedures for any official action it takes, including changing its own regulations. Those procedures include a Notice of Proposed Rule making, which must be introduced and accepted by the majority of commissioners. Then there's a public comment period on the proposal, followed by a comment period on the comments. Then the full commission votes. And at least three out of five commissioners need to approve those new rules before they can pass.
    So, it would appear that the FCC is changing things for all (well some) of the right reasons.
    This isn't exactly what Trump or Bush Sr. before him had in mind. And these 400 pages will make it extremely difficult, given the incredible Circus that is about to follow, the demonstrations from coast to coast, the mountain of lawsuits that are sure to effectively Trap Mr. Trump behind a wall of his own creation and (hopefully) take up the remainder of his term in Office so he can't cause any more damage in this direction.
    These are exciting times! The Leader Of the Free World has no idea which way is up. Exciting times, indeed!
    05-21-17 05:14 AM
  2. Fret Madden's Avatar
    Last time I checked the FCC was trying to set the ball rolling to get rid of net neutrality, because Ajit Pai is a paid shill for Verizon. What changed?
    05-21-17 12:25 PM
  3. stlabrat's Avatar
    I actually think net neutrality is not fair to telcos.with all the investment they put in to the infrastructure, they should have control. If gov want to make IT accessible for the masses tax credit for the small guy would be the better road. Let's see what happen to 5G.

    Posted via CB10
    05-21-17 12:53 PM
  4. Gatmyer's Avatar
    I actually think net neutrality is not fair to telcos.with all the investment they put in to the infrastructure, they should have control. If gov want to make IT accessible for the masses tax credit for the small guy would be the better road. Let's see what happen to 5G.

    Posted via CB10
    Enjoy your stuttering U-Tube videos. Unless you pay the premium of course
    05-21-17 04:23 PM
  5. stlabrat's Avatar
    Enjoy your stuttering U-Tube videos. Unless you pay the premium of course
    I am on 56k modem dail up. No YouTube for me. (however, do like Stanford University swift lectures on it... watch during lunch break at work).
    05-21-17 07:46 PM
  6. Lostboy5151's Avatar
    Last time I checked the FCC was trying to set the ball rolling to get rid of net neutrality, because Ajit Pai is a paid shill for Verizon. What changed?
    The other two guys!!
    05-21-17 09:52 PM
  7. Lostboy5151's Avatar
    I am on 56k modem dial up. No YouTube for me. (however, do like Stanford University swift lectures on it... watch during lunch break at work).
    No ! No you're not!!
    Wow, I would have had to start writing a reply yesterday.
    05-21-17 09:58 PM
  8. stlabrat's Avatar
    No ! No you're not!!
    Wow, I would have had to start writing a reply yesterday.
    Quite frankly, YouTube is not the good reason for net neutrality. You can always find a good buffer in software hardware to prevent the stutter. Skype or BBM video chat are the problem. But the 5G is going to change that. Who pays? Some one has to. Net neutrality prevent it's progress. Unless everyone is willing to pay for it, you are going to end like public highway system in NA. (or FCC start to collect extra tax, which might be less efficient than telco way).
    05-22-17 04:13 AM
  9. BriniaSona's Avatar
    I would hate if Rogers or bell got the say in who gets what. All small Internet companies in Canada would be dead and all websites would be split into "special packages". If you want Facebook and Twitter. You'd better pay 15 extra for that package. " YouTube and Spotify" 15 more. "Oh, you want Netflix. Lol, only after we gut it into 3 separate packages just like we do our cable services"
    05-23-17 10:13 AM
  10. stlabrat's Avatar
    Facebook and Twitter sell eye balls like Google. Netflix already have deal with Rogers, you do have to pay more anyhow. If my info is correct.

    Posted via CB10
    05-23-17 04:25 PM
  11. Lostboy5151's Avatar
    Everything is free on the internet. You just have to know where to look!!
    (actually, a friend told me that.)
    05-29-17 11:38 PM

Similar Threads

  1. can configure z30 with jio 4g voice. net is working
    By CrackBerry Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-12-17, 10:25 PM
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-16-17, 09:09 AM
  3. pearl 9105 net.rim.device.api.ui.scrollview not found
    By shmates in forum Older BlackBerrys
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-05-17, 01:06 AM
  4. ZD Net Dtek 60 review
    By smis in forum BlackBerry DTEK60
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-14-16, 06:07 PM
  5. red exclamation mark cannot get on net on Z10
    By CrackBerry Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-05-16, 01:23 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD