11-09-13 07:04 AM
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  1. kevinnugent's Avatar
    Management vendors race to help move BlackBerry users to Android and iOS - BlackBerry OS, Android, Mobile OSes, smartphones, Good Technology, software, mobile, system management, Blackberry, Mobile Iron, Android OS, consumer electronics - Hardware -

    BlackBerry's decision to remain a public company increases the uncertainty their customers feel, according to Good Technology
    Mikael Rickns (IDG News Service)06 November, 2013 17:18Comments.
    Mobile management vendors like Good Technology and MobileIron are increasing efforts to pitch Android and iOS as alternatives to BlackBerry, thanks to improved security and management tools.

    On Monday, BlackBerry announced it had abandoned plans to sell itself and will instead take a US$1 billion loan from a consortium involving shareholder Fairfax Financial Holdings. The company is also getting a new leader in former Sybase CEO John Chen, who joins the company as chairman and interim CEO.

    While the deal buys BlackBerry more time and a CEO who knows enterprise mobility, it still faces many challenges and CIOs need to plan for all possibilities. IT faces additional pressure from employees who want to use a wider variety of devices.

    "BlackBerry's decision to remain a public company increases the uncertainty their customers feel. It is accelerating the need to develop long-term mobility strategies that account for new mobile platforms," said Jeff McGrath, senior director of product marketing at Good Technology, via email.

    Good is one of the companies looking to benefit from BlackBerry's misfortunes, helping enterprises cope with multi-OS environments and implement bring your own device programs.

    Recently it launched consultancy services aimed at enterprises that want to migrate. The company's core offering is Good for Enterprise, which, for example, secures email and browser access with Common Criteria EAL-4+ certification and FIPS 140-2 validated encryption for iOS and Android. The platform is compatible with Windows Phone, as well.

    Competitor MobileIron also wants a piece of the pie, and on Wednesday it announced a release of its Android package. The company has worked with Divide, previously Enterproid, to offer native email, contacts and calendar functions. All content is encrypted and stored in a secure container on the mobile device. It too now has FIPS 140-2 validated encryption, MobileIron said.

    MobileIron has also integrated its management software with Samsung Electronics' Knox platform, and made it possible to protect IBM's Notes Traveler client for Android.

    Even though the competition has improved, replacing BlackBerry's integrated device management functionality and excellent security is a tall order. The company is still the gold standard when it comes to mobile security, according to Ovum analyst Richard Absalom.

    Depending on the level of security needed, different measures are required, from regular mobile device management to platforms that can separate enterprise apps from the rest of the OS, said Leif-Olof Wallin, research vice president at Gartner.

    Successfully migrating from a BlackBerry to a multi-OS mobile environment involves a combination of thoughtful planning and proper execution, according to MobileIron. As always, a good place to start is to find out what employees are really using and what they want to use, Absalom said.

    So far, iOS has been more successful than Android in the enterprise sector. Android hasn't had anywhere near the same impact on enterprises as on consumers, thanks in part to a fragmentization that drives up support and management costs, according to Wallin.

    To get around that, enterprises should standardize on a small number of specific device types, MobileIron wrote in a white paper on BlackBerry migration. It's also best to start with the basics, like standardizing email, before moving on to more advanced management activities, the company wrote.

    Allowing multiple OSes to be used isn't just about management: "A lot of people don't seem to think too much about how much more expensive data and call plans will be. Data usage on an iPhone compared to a BlackBerry is massively higher," said Absalom.

    Good Technology and MobileIron aren't the only vendors that offer software to help replace BlackBerry smartphones. Other alternatives include AirWatch, Citrix Systems, SAP and Samsung, according to Wallin. Absalom adds Fiberlink, BoxTone, Soti and Apperian to that list. A potential starting point is also BlackBerry's own cross-platform offerings, he said.

    However, BlackBerry isn't giving up without a fight. It is still a "brand with enormous potential -- but it's going to take time, discipline and tough decisions to reclaim our success," Chen said in statement on Monday.

    Send news tips and comments to mikael_ricknas@idg.com
    Last edited by elite1; 11-06-13 at 08:03 PM. Reason: Added QUOTE tags to quoted article
    11-06-13 07:55 PM
  2. Elite1's Avatar
    Finally in last sentence of second-last paragraph, the author mentions, or rather alludes to, BES10 which is a cross-platform MDM solution.

    As far as the decision to remain public, the comment about customer uncertainty comes from a director from Good. There's an obvious bias there.
    There's no backup to that statement in this article, it's just because he said so.

    Personally I can see the consumer ("prosumer"?) market being concerned or at least confused about the whole strategic alternatives business. In hindsight, the whole thing seems almost surreal to me in many ways. But I digress...

    However for enterprise / CIO's there's an obvious upside to BBRY remaining public: Compared to a private corporation, bad news will likely be more... wait for it... public.
    If a client wanted to stay with BBRY already anyway, they could do so knowing that they would hear about good or bad coming down the pipes earlier than they might have otherwise.
    11-06-13 08:12 PM
  3. eddy_berry's Avatar
    Somebody is scared. BBRY can't sit back on its laurels. They need to keep that Gold Standard and then raise the standard again. I would like to see them cover WP8 as well as iPhone and Android devices just to make sure their competition isn't able to hold that against them. Keep moving.

    P.S. - I like how the slogan "Keep Moving" is something they should be saying to themselves everyday. Go BBRY.
    bennelong and Elite1 like this.
    11-06-13 08:17 PM
  4. kevinnugent's Avatar
    Somebody is scared. BBRY can't sit back on its laurels. They need to keep that Gold Standard and then raise the standard again. I would like to see them cover WP8 as well as iPhone and Android devices just to make sure their competition isn't able to hold that against them. Keep moving.

    P.S. - I like how the slogan "Keep Moving" is something they should be saying to themselves everyday. Go BBRY.
    They said it to a CEO and 4,500 other staff this year as well.
    JeepBB likes this.
    11-06-13 08:25 PM
  5. Roo Zilla's Avatar
    Not sure why this is a surprise. With the uncertainty surrounding BlackBerry, a lot of companies using BlackBerry must be weighing their options for the future. It's not a shocker that some MDM companies are going into consulting to help them review their options. It would have been much more surprising had they not gone into consulting.
    Elite1 likes this.
    11-06-13 08:30 PM
  6. Elite1's Avatar
    They said it to a CEO and 4,500 other staff this year as well.
    Witty.

    Your point? Do you think those were bad moves?

    Personally I don't have enough info to judge it. I hope they were the right moves for BBRY obviously. Only more time will tell if it was nipping problem in the bud or another management misstep.
    kevinnugent likes this.
    11-06-13 08:36 PM
  7. trsbbs's Avatar
    Competitors are sensing blood in the water. Have been for the past year or more.

    They will mount a blitz now and use BlackBerry vulnerabilities against, real or perceived.



    Posted via CB10 on a Verizon Z10 running 10.2.0.1791
    Anilu7 and world saviour like this.
    11-06-13 08:46 PM
  8. kevinnugent's Avatar
    Witty.

    Your point? Do you think those were bad moves?

    .
    Honestly, I don't know. I sure Heins didn't purposely set out to nearly destroy the company. He may have been given a brief to sell it though, and they finally couldn't accept the fact he couldn't do that in the end. Even at the bargain basement price. Either way, I think he had to go to give them another clean slate.

    The staff layoffs? That's a hard one. Just about every company's major expense is salaries and wages. The first rule of trying to turn around a bad situation for some management people is to cut staff. There's lots of differing opinion on this method - and some people propose trying to raise revenue through marketing and sales rather than cut expenses. Some do both.

    If Blackberry recover in the 6 quarters Chen is talking, then it'll be interesting to see what they look like then.
    11-06-13 08:51 PM
  9. TOfinest's Avatar
    Go BlackBerry
    11-06-13 08:56 PM
  10. Elite1's Avatar
    Honestly, I don't know. I sure Heins didn't purposely set out to nearly destroy the company. He may have been given a brief to sell it though, and they finally couldn't accept the fact he couldn't do that in the end. Even at the bargain basement price. Either way, I think he had to go to give them another clean slate.

    The staff layoffs? That's a hard one. Just about every company's major expense is salaries and wages. The first rule of trying to turn around a bad situation for some management people is to cut staff. There's lots of differing opinion on this method - and some people propose trying to raise revenue through marketing and sales rather than cut expenses. Some do both.

    If Blackberry recover in the 6 quarters Chen is talking, then it'll be interesting to see what they look like then.
    I'm not used to agreeing with you. I don't know what to do now. LoL...

    *wanders away with confused look*
    11-06-13 09:05 PM
  11. sjmartin007's Avatar
    This is all hype. The main issue with BYOD is not the corporate side of the device is the personal side. Users are allowing kids and themselves to download and some times upload content that creates convertibles. It is a good option with these management companies but business attacks are increasing even more now everyone is carting their devices to work.

    Posted from the most powerful smartphone,z10
    11-07-13 04:28 AM
  12. wafiwanders's Avatar
    I have always liked Blackberry and defended them if needed but now the vultures are circling I feel more supportive than before.

    Blackberry produce a bloody good product but suffered from bad management and rubbish marketing and hopefully that will be fixed.
    That's my opinion and if people disagree that is their right
    11-07-13 04:42 AM
  13. m1a1mg's Avatar
    It just makes good business sense. If your competition is falling on hard times, you don't help them up the hill. You keep pushing them back down.
    techvisor and anon1727506 like this.
    11-07-13 08:14 AM
  14. undone's Avatar
    I can't imagine Chen doesn't bring a certain credibility back to BB. Heins was an untest CEO. My guess, first thing Chen is doing is talking to all the Fortune 500 companies that BB currently does business with. I think with Heins you just had to wait until BB collapsed (ie no rush to get clients, BB did all the work for you), Chen has the street credit that Heins didn't so you need to lock in deals before BB gain any traction...
    11-07-13 08:24 AM
  15. cgk's Avatar

    As far as the decision to remain public, the comment about customer uncertainty comes from a director from Good. There's an obvious bias there.
    There's no backup to that statement in this article, it's just because he said so.
    What has actually changed? Last week, BBRY were a failing business looking for a business model and this week they are a failing business looking for a business model with some added debt and a stand-in CEO - at best uncertainty might not have increased but it surely hasn't decreased.
    11-07-13 09:24 AM
  16. Anilu7's Avatar
    I can't imagine Chen doesn't bring a certain credibility back to BB. Heins was an untest CEO. My guess, first thing Chen is doing is talking to all the Fortune 500 companies that BB currently does business with. I think with Heins you just had to wait until BB collapsed (ie no rush to get clients, BB did all the work for you), Chen has the street credit that Heins didn't so you need to lock in deals before BB gain any traction...
    Can`t agree there. Under Heins` tenure, you did see a lot of visits from Vivek and others to large businesses selling them on BES 10 and BB10 devices.
    Elite1 likes this.
    11-07-13 10:55 AM
  17. Elite1's Avatar
    What has actually changed? Last week, BBRY were a failing business looking for a business model and this week they are a failing business looking for a business model with some added debt and a stand-in CEO - at best uncertainty might not have increased but it surely hasn't decreased.
    I pretty much agree with you. That's my point, not much has changed (yet).
    The news that the sale is off will be considered good news or bad news by various camps following the BBRY story closely. But for those just hearing the odd snippet or maybe aware that they don't understand enough to know whether public or private is better, there is a removal of uncertainty. We don't need to wonder whether this or that deal is coming and whether or not a buyer or BBRY themselves wants to dismantle the business.

    Anyway that was all a little long-winded, sorry. My point wasn't that BBRY is doing all aces now after the news. I was just saying that this news probably hasn't increased uncertainty as per the self-serving claim of the Good staffer. That's all.
    Sith_Apprentice likes this.
    11-07-13 11:27 AM
  18. sati01's Avatar
    While John Chen is trying to restore confidence, competitors are spreading FUD (Fear, uncertainty and doubt).
    11-07-13 11:53 AM
  19. kevinnugent's Avatar
    While John Chen is trying to restore confidence, competitors are spreading FUD (Fear, uncertainty and doubt).
    Blackberry don't need anyone else to do that. They are perfectly capable and it's one of their most consistent failings.
    11-07-13 02:15 PM
  20. DenverRalphy's Avatar
    While John Chen is trying to restore confidence, competitors are spreading FUD (Fear, uncertainty and doubt).
    With BBRY's fate in doubt by their own merits, and any renewed long term commitments being questionable... In this case, FUD is a reasonable concern.

    SwiftKeyed/Flowed via Tapatalk 4 Beta
    11-07-13 02:32 PM
  21. undone's Avatar
    Can`t agree there. Under Heins` tenure, you did see a lot of visits from Vivek and others to large businesses selling them on BES 10 and BB10 devices.
    I have no doubt they did (continue) to do these things, my point was with all the uncertainty around BB as of late, Chen would have to use is street credit to calm any on the fence clients and bring them into the fold of BB10. I just don't think Heins had that same credit.
    Elite1 likes this.
    11-07-13 02:45 PM
  22. sati01's Avatar
    With BBRY's fate in doubt by their own merits, and any renewed long term commitments being questionable... In this case, FUD is a reasonable concern.

    SwiftKeyed/Flowed via Tapatalk 4 Beta
    But, if they feel they have to spread FUD about BlackBerry is because the see some danger, they see good chances for the company to regroup and become a major player in MDM.
    Last edited by sati01; 11-07-13 at 04:31 PM.
    bennelong likes this.
    11-07-13 04:03 PM
  23. DenverRalphy's Avatar
    But, if they feel they have to spread FUD about BlackBerry is because the see some danger, they see good chances for the company to regroup and become a major player in MDM.
    No. They see opportunity. BB is already a major player, so there's no fear that they'll "become" one.
    11-07-13 06:35 PM
  24. bennelong's Avatar
    Certainly interesting that opposing market forces feel the need to hurry up and secure their customer base.
    With Google having such a stake in the game, is it any wonder there's such wholesale bias in the media?
    (Someone please pooh-pooh this).

    Z10 via CB10
    11-08-13 04:34 AM
  25. anon1727506's Avatar
    Best way to grow your business is to steal someone elses. BlackBerry has left the doors open with all the valuables left out on display, there is no wonder that other MDM vendors are tripping over each other to get back out with the goods.

    I imagine that most enterprise IT departments that are BlackBerry shops, have opened their doors to other vendors just to get an idea of what they will have to do if the worst befell BlackBerry. It is NEVER a good idea to let your customers compare your product unless you know it is the best. And from what I have seen BES10 is NOT they best MDM system out there. It might be the most secure when combined with BlackBerry hardware (which no one know if there will be BB hardware), but combined with iOS and Android if falls short in many categories right now.
    11-08-13 08:53 AM
28 12

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