1. jope28's Avatar
    BlackBerry always touts their iOT plans. This article is talking about a new competing platform for that same space.
    BlackBerry has been working on it for a while, so I hope they have the advantage.
    Huawei's LiteOS looks to play central role in Internet of Things - CNET

    Attachment 353700

    [Hopefully NOT edited by admin to be fair lol. ] Frosty White Q10/10.3.2.680 CB10
    05-20-15 03:06 PM
  2. ccbs's Avatar
    All the key controller + wifi chip vendors (Qualcomm, Broadcom, Marvell, Mediatek) have their own software stack, which are free and based on linux. Unless extra cost is justified by adding certain security features, normal Iot vendors will not pay for the QNX stack.
    sentimentGX4 likes this.
    05-20-15 03:21 PM
  3. birdman_38's Avatar
    All the key controller + wifi chip vendors (Qualcomm, Broadcom, Marvell, Mediatek) have their own software stack, which are free and based on linux. Unless extra cost is justified by adding certain security features, normal Iot vendors will not pay for the QNX stack.
    Good to know.

    Expect more OEMs to release their own OS to compete in this space.
    05-20-15 03:25 PM
  4. BCITMike's Avatar
    All the key controller + wifi chip vendors (Qualcomm, Broadcom, Marvell, Mediatek) have their own software stack, which are free and based on linux. Unless extra cost is justified by adding certain security features, normal Iot vendors will not pay for the QNX stack.
    I would take QNX or BlackBerry over Qualcomm any day of the week.

    Posted via CB10
    05-20-15 05:32 PM
  5. eldricho's Avatar
    I would take QNX or BlackBerry over Qualcomm any day of the week.

    Posted via CB10
    And here's to hoping a lot of vendors share this exact same thought!
    05-20-15 05:45 PM
  6. DenverRalphy's Avatar
    All the key controller + wifi chip vendors (Qualcomm, Broadcom, Marvell, Mediatek) have their own software stack, which are free and based on linux. Unless extra cost is justified by adding certain security features, normal Iot vendors will not pay for the QNX stack.
    Huh? What? Qualcom etc.. Have nothing to do with a software stack. You're comparing hardware vendors to software. The stack is a function of the software (and no it's not based on Linux, but instead on an accepted developer industry standard). Each OS development will produce a Stack Handler, and for the most part all OS's follow the same standard (with occasional detractors like the old and obsolete Solaris). The stack is a software function designed for organizational purposes. It's not hardware design.


    Via Tapatalk
    05-20-15 06:12 PM
  7. ccbs's Avatar
    Huh? What? Qualcom etc.. Have nothing to do with a software stack. You're comparing hardware vendors to software. The stack is a function of the software (and no it's not based on Linux, but instead on an accepted developer industry standard). Each OS development will produce a Stack Handler, and for the most part all OS's follow the same standard (with occasional detractors like the old and obsolete Solaris). The stack is a software function designed for organizational purposes. It's not hardware design.


    Via Tapatalk
    All the chip vendors has the hardware design plus the full software stack (OS, driver, protocol stack) fully implemented and validated for the customers to use. It is very standard in the SOC field where pretty much everyone is selling turn-key system solution( the system here include both software + hardware). Most vendors will even pay to have the system (software mostly) passing specific certification if certain quantity is met. For instances, recently Marvell and Broadcom just got one of their system software Apple-Homekit certified.
    05-21-15 05:09 PM
  8. DenverRalphy's Avatar
    All the chip vendors has the hardware design plus the full software stack (OS, driver, protocol stack) fully implemented and validated for the customers to use. It is very standard in the SOC field where pretty much everyone is selling turn-key system solution( the system here include both software + hardware). Most vendors will even pay to have the system (software mostly) passing specific certification if certain quantity is met. For instances, recently Marvell and Broadcom just got one of their system software Apple-Homekit certified.
    Where are you getting this from? A hardware reliable stack became obsolete in the 80's. Some manufacturers made the stack First in Last Out, and for some manufacturers it was First in First Out. But that's all way way way in the past. Stacks are now software driven. It's not hardware driven, it's software driven (well, technically speaking... no, but for software development purpsoses... yep. It actually gets more convoluted. Simply put... the stack is a flexible tool today whereas yester year it was a solid set in stone fact of computing-life). Chip vendors/manufacturers provide documented idiosyncrasies to allow for specific driver development. It's all software development built to accommodate hardware. That's why they provide detailed documentation to allow for driver development.
    05-21-15 06:30 PM
  9. Ment's Avatar
    BB better get its rear-end in gear with some big partnerships cause Google Brillo is coming.

    To that end, Google is working on technology that could run on low-powered devices, possibly with as few as 64 or 32 megabytes of random-access memory, according to people who have been briefed about the project.

    Google is likely to release the software under the Android brand, as the group developing the software is linked to the company’s Android unit. The lower memory requirements for devices running the new software would mark a sharp drop from the latest versions of Android, which are primarily aimed at mobile phones with at least 512 megabytes of memory.
    I assume the Google Thread project will be dovetailed into this solution. Its going to be a very crowded space and lots of shakeout and acquisitions in the near future as IOT comes together.

    Windows 10 has a IOT version although I haven't read up much on it. Apparently it works on the Raspberry.
    05-21-15 06:55 PM
  10. BCITMike's Avatar
    BB better get its rear-end in gear with some big partnerships cause Google Brillo is coming.



    I assume the Google Thread project will be dovetailed into this solution. Its going to be a very crowded space and lots of shakeout and acquisitions in the near future as IOT comes together.

    Windows 10 has a IOT version although I haven't read up much on it. Apparently it works on the Raspberry.
    I don't think Google has the experience of programming for embedded devices, efficiently. Sure, they have an OS for a phone, but they have different applications and different intentions.

    I recall when a contracted developer who simulated ARQ on computers for a certain wireless protocol flew to our offices to integrate it into our product and it didn't work, at all. One of our developers told me they designed it as if it ran on a P4-3GHz with 4GB of RAM, rather than a 333MHz processor with 32MB of RAM. Basically had to start over from scratch and ended up being here for like 3 months, and it still didn't work great in the end.

    Meanwhile, QNX has been running off of floppies for years. So if it shares anything with Android, I doubt it will run nearly as efficiently as QNX would on the same hardware. Where the big difference is, is that Android will have a free SDK, whereas I'm guessing its 5-6 figures (per year) to get into QNX development. But that is the difference of real time operating system and stability.
    05-21-15 08:30 PM
  11. jope28's Avatar
    Busy day for iOT news lol
    http://www.zdnet.com/article/google-...homekit-tizen/
    Looks like Google will make it run on 32MB of RAM.

    Attachment 353918

    And http://m.androidcentral.com/brillo-g...t-it-google-io

    [Hopefully NOT edited by admin to be fair lol. ] Frosty White Q10/10.3.2.680 CB10
    Last edited by jope28; 05-21-15 at 09:09 PM.
    05-21-15 08:44 PM
  12. DaedalusIcarusHelios's Avatar
    32 MB of RAM is simply too much for many products that are meant to be "smart" and part of this IoT paradigm. I have no doubt Google will barge their way in with devices that will run it, but it is scary to me that everything is going to be online with very little thought of security. BlackBerry needs to push harder for mind share in this area. They are already utilizing QNX in many ways for this stuff, but they will get railroaded by the big players with likely inferior products.

    Posted via CB10
    05-21-15 09:09 PM
  13. Ment's Avatar
    I don't think Google has the experience of programming for embedded devices, efficiently. Sure, they have an OS for a phone, but they have different applications and different intentions.
    .
    Remember Android was created from a server OS so don't count them short, plus the experience of Android Wear should help them.

    They've been researching IOT for a few quite a while now and were going to debut Android Home a few years ago but decided the market/tech innovation wasn't right yet; have made acquisitions like Nest, Dropcam and some smarthome company which I forget the name, and numerous companies in AI and robotics. I think they realized with the success of Apple that having a software only solution ala Android isn't going to hack it in IOT, it will take too long to wrangle all the hardware partners like the herd of cats they are, the HTC,LGs of the world will follow as they are able. They need to bring out a suite of actual consumer products along with the IOT capabilities so the consumer experience is seemless from wake-to-bed.

    As for BB, I'm pretty sure their IOT strategy is going to be the backend: competing against the Cisco and Sierra Wireless types , there hasn't really been anything I've seen about consumer facing solutions. I do know that offering QNX only, as the best solution won't be enough otherwise they're in danger of it being co-opted into other more profitable ventures just like QNX for auto has been.
    jope28 likes this.
    05-21-15 09:09 PM
  14. BCITMike's Avatar
    Remember Android was created from a server OS so don't count them short, plus the experience of Android Wear should help them.

    Source? All I can find is that it was initially supposed to be a camera OS and they use a linux kernel, but I haven't found anything saying it was created from a server OS. Thanks
    05-21-15 09:33 PM
  15. Ment's Avatar
    Source? All I can find is that it was initially supposed to be a camera OS and they use a linux kernel, but I haven't found anything saying it was created from a server OS. Thanks
    Yes they use the Linux kernel but you have to understand the kernal for Linux is responsible for many more functions than a QNX kernel, its almost like an OS itself. That plus Android and Linux share alot of code and compatibilities, thus you use similar command language for terminal for example. Thats what I meant by 'server os' not that Android just tweaked an Linux distro ala UBUNTU and put it into phones sorry for the inexact wording.
    05-21-15 09:45 PM
  16. jope28's Avatar
    32 MB of RAM is simply too much for many products that are meant to be "smart" and part of this IoT paradigm. I have no doubt Google will barge their way in with devices that will run it, but it is scary to me that everything is going to be online with very little thought of security. BlackBerry needs to push harder for mind share in this area. They are already utilizing QNX in many ways for this stuff, but they will get railroaded by the big players with likely inferior products.

    Posted via CB10
    It's also just crazy to think that an OS can be so small. The link on the OP talks about how the entire OS there is just 10KB.

    "LiteOS is exceedingly small in size, coming in at just 10KB..."

    I wonder how big the comparable QNX one would be.


    [Hopefully NOT edited by admin to be fair lol. ] Frosty White Q10/10.3.2.680 CB10
    05-21-15 09:46 PM
  17. BCITMike's Avatar
    Yes they use the Linux kernel but you have to understand the kernal for Linux is responsible for many more functions than a QNX kernel, its almost like an OS itself. That plus Android and Linux share alot of code and compatibilities, thus you use similar command language for terminal for example. Thats what I meant by 'server os' not that Android just tweaked an Linux distro ala UBUNTU and put it into phones sorry for the inexact wording.
    Without getting into specifics, I'm not sure what you are trying to say. The kernel can be tuned a million ways. Having it do more would make it bigger and bloated, rather than stripped down to essentials.

    The linux kernel is not a magical stable OS.
    05-22-15 04:44 PM
  18. Ment's Avatar
    Without getting into specifics, I'm not sure what you are trying to say. The kernel can be tuned a million ways. Having it do more would make it bigger and bloated, rather than stripped down to essentials.

    The linux kernel is not a magical stable OS.
    Yes you could say its bloated vs the QNX microkernel, Linux kernel even has kernel level drivers for camera, usb etc. and having more functions vs QNX kernel could mean its not as well suited for embedded devices but thats not going to stop adoption if the other factors, such as overall ecosystem out weigh it.
    05-22-15 05:31 PM

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