10-11-19 09:53 AM
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  1. faizankhan85's Avatar
    Dear all

    I saw this on wikipedia today, what are your thoughts?

    Have we been really so naive in believing that BlackBerry was the most secure provider of all ?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/BlackBerry
    Attached Thumbnails Has BlackBerry ever been secure?-741244.jpg  
    07-28-18 01:27 PM
  2. conite's Avatar
    Dear all

    I saw this on wikipedia today, what are your thoughts?

    Have we been really so naive in believing that BlackBerry was the most secure provider of all ?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/BlackBerry
    There's secure, and there's NSA-secure. Nothing is the latter.
    07-28-18 01:38 PM
  3. faizankhan85's Avatar
    So then it's not secure?

    By my definition secure means that it's inaccessible to anyone but you.

    If other government bodies can access it, who is to say other ordinary people with Knowledge can't access it?
    Alonso2019 likes this.
    07-28-18 01:41 PM
  4. conite's Avatar
    So then it's not secure?

    By my definition secure means that it's inaccessible to anyone but you.

    If other government bodies can access it, who is to say other ordinary people with Knowledge can't access it?
    Someone else with hundreds of millions of dollars of resources and has government-level control of every industry, sure.
    skrble likes this.
    07-28-18 01:43 PM
  5. faizankhan85's Avatar
    hey you hear about billionaire cartels 'CEOs' (like guzman), so you never know!
    07-28-18 01:49 PM
  6. Mecca EL's Avatar
    So then it's not secure?

    By my definition secure means that it's inaccessible to anyone but you.

    If other government bodies can access it, who is to say other ordinary people with Knowledge can't access it?
    Short of being an informed user, nothing.

    The idea of "trust" is as shortsighted as blind person with a telescope. Trust isn't simply accepting what you are told. That's belief. Trust is having experience in the knowledge you've collected, and still anticipating some parts of that collection to have a hole in it.

    Think of Trust and Security like a house that is off the grid, a lock system that you created yourself, all possible entrance and exit controlled solely by you. Who has a phone, computer, or electronic device like this? The amount of OCD it would take to maintain this system would appear to be insane.

    It is also insane to "trust" any company, whose business it is to collect and sell data.
    ezubeBB2013 likes this.
    07-28-18 01:55 PM
  7. faizankhan85's Avatar
    Short of being an informed user, nothing.

    The idea of "trust" is as shortsighted as blind person with a telescope. Trust isn't simply accepting what you are told. That's belief. Trust is having experience in the knowledge you've collected, and still anticipating some parts of that collection to have a hole in it.

    Think of Trust and Security like a house that is off the grid, a lock system that you created yourself, all possible entrance and exit controlled solely by you. Who has a phone, computer, or electronic device like this? The amount of OCD it would take to maintain this system would appear to be insane.

    It is also insane to "trust" any company, whose business it is to collect and sell data.
    Thank you for your response... food for thought!

    Perhaps I got belief and trust the wrong way round to my naivety
    Mecca EL likes this.
    07-28-18 02:00 PM
  8. anon(10218918)'s Avatar
    I believe, the behaviour of the "Five Eyes" (GCHQ, NSA and others) is the reason, why the security updates always take such a long time to reach the consumers.

    Posted via CB10
    Last edited by CrackPriv; 07-29-18 at 10:39 AM.
    07-29-18 04:53 AM
  9. faizankhan85's Avatar
    I believe, the behaviour of the "Five Eyes" (GCHQ, NSA and others) is the reason, why the security updates always take such along time to reach the consumers.

    Posted via CB10
    That's a valid thought, never thought of it that way!

    Although I have nothing to hide, I don't understand why we must be under constant surveillance... where is the freedom in that?

    One that is constantly pointed out to us in comparison to less economically developed countries that are ruled by 'dictators'. In essence we are no different, the only difference is that we are monitored behind close doors - what's worse? I believe the cloak and dagger approach!
    anon(10218918) and Mecca EL like this.
    07-29-18 09:48 AM
  10. thurask's Avatar
    Have we been really so naive in believing that BlackBerry was the most secure provider of all ?
    It depends if it's a state actor trying to get into your phone or not. If it is, roll out the red carpet.
    07-29-18 09:52 AM
  11. faizankhan85's Avatar
    It depends if it's a state actor trying to get into your phone or not. If it is, roll out the red carpet.
    Thats an interesting read, thanks for sharing!

    I am really surprised by things I've read recently. However, due to the overwhelming amount of fakenews (some say which is more than real news) diluting our news/media outlets, I don't know what to truly believe anymore.

    I only brought it up as I was not sure if BlackBerry should be still marketing themselves as the most secure android phone, if it's really not that secure after all.
    07-29-18 09:58 AM
  12. anon(10321802)'s Avatar
    Thats an interesting read, thanks for sharing!

    I am really surprised by things I've read recently. However, due to the overwhelming amount of fakenews (some say which is more than real news) diluting our news/media outlets, I don't know what to truly believe anymore.

    I only brought it up as I was not sure if BlackBerry should be still marketing themselves as the most secure android phone, if it's really not that secure after all.
    Well there's security and then there's privacy. They're related, but they're not the same thing.

    BlackBerry Android devices may indeed be more secure than the average Android device through proprietary hardware and software features, meaning it is more difficult for an attacker to compromise the device.

    But Android itself is a vehicle for data mining and tracking by Google and dozens of other third parties - companies with names you've never heard of and with different privacy policies and ethics. In that sense, BlackBerry Android devices are just like any other Android device. If you use any mainstream Android apps, most of them have embedded trackers that monitor and record everything from your location, to your browsing history, to your sleep habits.

    So assuming BlackBerry's claims of being the most secure Android device may be true, I believe any claims of protecting your privacy hold no water as long as they're running Android.
    whatsever likes this.
    07-29-18 11:39 AM
  13. THBW's Avatar
    Anything can be hacked. It's just a matter of how much time, people and resources you're willing to throw at it.

    Posted via CB10
    rthonpm likes this.
    07-30-18 07:17 PM
  14. rajashekar sanga's Avatar
    If the device is not open for Government Security Agencies , Then it can be definitely used to disrupt the security provided by the government!
    And other people with knowledge can access your device only if you are sharing the access controls knowingly or unknowingly!
    08-02-18 01:23 PM
  15. Emaderton3's Avatar
    Ugh. Are we talking privacy or security?
    08-02-18 05:22 PM
  16. rthonpm's Avatar
    Privacy vs security is always a distinction that needs to be made in any discussion of security.

    A few points for the OP:

    Your Wikipedia post references nation state access only to BIS from the old BBOS devices.

    Many of the security claims made by BlackBerry in the past relied on not only using a BlackBerry handset, but also managing them through BES.

    The Android claims are made with their hardening of Android in mind. BlackBerry cannot significantly alter the core structure of Android, but they can buttress the inherent security components offered by the hardware and OS.

    Posted via CB10
    08-13-18 06:26 AM
  17. ZeBB45's Avatar
    That's a valid thought, never thought of it that way!

    Although I have nothing to hide, I don't understand why we must be under constant surveillance... where is the freedom in that?

    One that is constantly pointed out to us in comparison to less economically developed countries that are ruled by 'dictators'. In essence we are no different, the only difference is that we are monitored behind close doors - what's worse? I believe the cloak and dagger approach!
    Communism, bro

    Posted via CB10
    skrble likes this.
    09-17-18 01:43 PM
  18. ZeBB45's Avatar
    In all seriousness, as soon as you connect to the Internet, you're giving away private information. Your ISP is capturing it. Yes, you can use a VPN, but how much do you trust your provider with your information?

    Don't get me wrong. I don't think BB10 is Jam-packed, full of backdoors (compared to Android or iOS).

    Posted via CB10
    09-17-18 01:46 PM
  19. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    Your Wikipedia post references nation state access only to BIS from the old BBOS devices.

    Many of the security claims made by BlackBerry in the past relied on not only using a BlackBerry handset, but also managing them through BES.
    BIS did not create encrypted data traffic - it provided no additional encryption beyond any normal device. Consumer BBM was moderately encrypted but with a single system-wide key that should be considered transparent to nation-states. BIS's only "security" add-on was that messages were re-routed to travel through BB's network (in most countries) rather than through the general Internet.

    Given that there's really nothing to talk about regarding "BIS encryption" (as such a thing never existed), any discussions about breaking, bypassing, or being given keys to BB's encryption would be talking about systems that actually use encryption - such as BES.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    09-24-18 02:53 PM
  20. ezubeBB2013's Avatar
    Well there's security and then there's privacy. They're related, but they're not the same thing.

    BlackBerry Android devices may indeed be more secure than the average Android device through proprietary hardware and software features, meaning it is more difficult for an attacker to compromise the device.

    But Android itself is a vehicle for data mining and tracking by Google and dozens of other third parties - companies with names you've never heard of and with different privacy policies and ethics. In that sense, BlackBerry Android devices are just like any other Android device. If you use any mainstream Android apps, most of them have embedded trackers that monitor and record everything from your location, to your browsing history, to your sleep habits.

    So assuming BlackBerry's claims of being the most secure Android device may be true, I believe any claims of protecting your privacy hold no water as long as they're running Android.

    Majority of people are android users why don't they mind being data mined and tracked? Do they really 'trust' Google.

    Posted via BlackBerry Passport
    10-15-18 11:29 AM
  21. Digital_Islandboy's Avatar
    Dear all

    I saw this on wikipedia today, what are your thoughts?

    Have we been really so naive in believing that BlackBerry was the most secure provider of all ?

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/BlackBerry
    SMS is not encrypted. It is an open standard like (POP3 /SMTP) email is. Apple tries to get you to stop using SMS and instead use their iMessage platform.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IMessage

    If you REALLY want to help security you can use distributed computing and run one of two projects which try to push the limits on creating tougher encryption. 1) Finding new million+ digit prime numbers. Such as www.Mersenne.org Prime Numbers are used in Internet Encryption and finding new longer digit numbers helps create higher level of encryption.

    2) The other Project is www.Distributed.net which tries to find weaknesses in current encryption levels with the aim of of stress testing current encryption levels and finding future solutions for use.
    10-31-18 01:29 AM
  22. TrumpetTiger's Avatar
    Majority of people are android users why don't they mind being data mined and tracked? Do they really 'trust' Google.

    Posted via BlackBerry Passport
    Yes.


    Posted via CB10
    Alonso2019 likes this.
    10-31-18 02:31 AM
  23. Alonso2019's Avatar
    BB has a robust structure back then during early 200s
    11-05-18 05:43 AM
  24. i_plod_an_dr_void's Avatar
    It depends if it's a state actor trying to get into your phone or not. If it is, roll out the red carpet.
    Of course it is claimed that the FBI got a 3rd party CrackerJAck hack to break-into the iPhone that Apple publicly refused to do, apparantly costing not an insignificant sum of money to the government.
    11-10-18 07:53 AM
  25. RLeeSimon's Avatar
    with all the outside security companies they bought it sure ought'a be by now...
    11-11-18 02:31 PM
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