02-18-14 10:31 PM
259 ... 34567 ...
tools
  1. R Field's Avatar
    Because they aren't in the grave doesn't mean they aren't dead. I like to think of BB as a zombie that has escaped a stab to the head over the last couple years.

    Sent from my SM-N900V using Tapatalk
    Smaller yes, dead no. That would mean they were bankrupt, ceased operations completely or were sold off none of which has happened. As much as the lot of you want a duopoly they're still in the game as a smaller player but in regardless.
    12-22-13 01:34 PM
  2. ocgltd's Avatar
    Great thread title! way to be supportive, exactly what you want people to see when they do a google search....NOT

    Posted via CB10
    It's not the customer's job to be 'supportive', customers go where they find the best value. I think the thread and subject are appropriate and reasonable. After investing $600 in a new phone it can be disconcerting to hear that your purchase may no longer receive much attention from the manufacturer. (See the numerous Playbook threads).

    If BB focuses on low-end "developing" markets then they will not be able to retain the level of software development we have been accustomed to. If BB focuses on "enterprise" then expect low sell through volumes (and again less $ to reinvest in the product and R&D).

    I understand that Chen may have little choice - but don't critize the OP for a reasonable post.
    ekv, cwalt2166, techvisor and 5 others like this.
    12-22-13 01:36 PM
  3. LuvULongTime's Avatar
    Yes, they will be able to make cheaper devices... and they will probably be able to better compete on price with the cheaper Android devices.

    But I don't believe the Google Play support. Why would Google allow Blackberry (ie. the competition) access to Google Play when it could take away some of Android's marketshare. While I think that's just a pipe-dream that BB having access to Google Play will make much of a difference - I don't see Google allowing it anyway.

    The Blackberry name is DIRT... MUD really. Most people will just avoid Blackberry altogether because of all the negative connotations associated with it. Plus, if people want access to the Android ecosystem - they'll buy an Android device. Simple as that.

    Every step of the way since Blackberry tried to make a comeback with BB10, everyone here has been disappointed. Yet, there are those who still hold out hope - even though there's really no reason to believe it will get better. It will NOT work out... it's over.
    OK, great. You've admitted Foxconn can and will be able to make cheaper devices. This is really step 1. And this is how MS did it with the Nokia Lumina 5xx, and 6xx series of phones. I think Google would gladly allow Google play on BBRY devices assuming they get something out of it.
    bungaboy likes this.
    12-22-13 01:38 PM
  4. TGR1's Avatar
    I think Google would gladly allow Google play on BBRY devices assuming they get something out of it.
    What would Google get out of allowing BlackBerry Google Play access, other than po'ing Android vendors currently kept on a strict leash?
    techvisor and JeepBB like this.
    12-22-13 02:01 PM
  5. ekv's Avatar
    Just assuming Blackberry is exiting the consumer market in NA, what words will a CEO use to break it in an earnings call.
    Would it not be something similar to what was said...

    Do you expect him to say "we will make sure none of you in NA are able to buy a Blackberry" ?


    Sent from my iPad using CB Forums mobile app
    12-22-13 02:14 PM
  6. needforbbx's Avatar
    If they are going to sell enterprise units, they will most likely still sell through carriers. Enterprise purchases of devices are through carries i.e. have arrangements with bell / rogers etc... If they are available through carries, I'm sure you can get you hands on a unit if you want one.
    12-22-13 02:14 PM
  7. lawguyman's Avatar
    Just assuming Blackberry is exiting the consumer market in NA, what words will a CEO use to break it in an earnings call.
    Would it not be something similar to what was said...

    Do you expect him to say "we will make sure none of you in NA are able to buy a Blackberry" ?


    Sent from my iPad using CB Forums mobile app
    Putting aside the fact that he went out of his way to say that there is a "consumer" strategy, answer this:

    Are people who work in regulated industries like banking, finance, government, and the military consumers or not?




    Posted via CB10
    12-22-13 02:26 PM
  8. GadgetTravel's Avatar
    It's nothing personal. It's business. BlackBerry must save the ship. In this case, it means dropping the consumer market in North America. It sux but it makes sense.

    Poetry in Motion
    Isn't that what Michael said when he kissed Fredo on the lips. .
    12-22-13 03:21 PM
  9. sentimentGX4's Avatar
    Foxconn probably already has a good idea of what their first Jakarta phone will look like from a component and cost perspective. They know they can compete with the cheap Android OEM's, otherwise the wouldn't have bothered entering into an agreement with BBRY.
    I'd like to preface this by saying I have no doubt that there is a possibility Blackberry could maintain a significant presence in the Indonesian market.

    What has been failed to addressed is how dominating the Indonesian market will save Blackberry. The Indonesian market is smaller and much less affluent than the US market. Heck, its much smaller and a bit less affluent than the Chinese market and, tbh, there has never been much value in even the much hyped Chinese market. Companies like Oppo and Jiayu and Meizu are not rolling in cash.

    In order for Blackberry to maintain itself, it will need Indonesia and India and a bunch of other developing nations, many of which it has no stronghold in. Also, it is crucial to note none of the low end OEMs in any developing nations have the resources to support an entire OS. At best, they have a forked Android.

    So what I'd like to know is how Blackberry intends to make big money off of Indonesia. As I see it, even a successful strategy will mean the retirement of BB10 and possibly the end of the company.
    techvisor and JeepBB like this.
    12-22-13 03:27 PM
  10. GadgetTravel's Avatar
    Putting aside the fact that he went out of his way to say that there is a "consumer" strategy, answer this:

    Are people who work in regulated industries like banking, finance, government, and the military consumers or not?




    Posted via CB10
    No, they aren't considered the consumer market.
    12-22-13 03:33 PM
  11. lawguyman's Avatar
    No, they aren't considered the consumer market.
    Thanks for not answering the question.


    Posted via CB10
    12-22-13 03:58 PM
  12. lnichols's Avatar
    The Z10 sells for less than $300 unlocked and Bold series you can get it for less than $200..compared to high end phones like the Galaxy, Htc One, and iPhones that all run over $600, they are quite cheap.
    Where? The $200 deal in the US was the only one I've seen as cheap or cheaper than you mention. $400 is the standard price for unlocked Z10 in US.

    Posted via CB10
    12-22-13 04:03 PM
  13. GadgetTravel's Avatar
    Thanks for not answering the question.


    Posted via CB10
    Is there a typo here? "No" seemed like a pretty clear answer to me. Sort of binary even.
    cwalt2166, ekv, techvisor and 1 others like this.
    12-22-13 04:15 PM
  14. Gazza12's Avatar
    The app issue aside, if the US, Canadian and Australian consumer markets have been led into inferior products through clever marketing, peer pressure and poor press, then its their loss and will suffer limited access to BB.

    Chen is a very clever man. The emerging markets offer over a billion customers eager to enjoy what the west has had to offer. There will be enormous status for BB users in the east.
    Their largest markets now are in what are loosely defined as emerging economies.
    12-22-13 04:22 PM
  15. NYC10065's Avatar
    It's over -- there's no such thing as an "enterprise only" customer unless BB thinks it has the heft and influence to go against the BYOD trend that has been written/talked about ad nauseum for the past few years. Focusing on
    "enterprise only" would only make sense if the market continued to exist.
    JeepBB and ocgltd like this.
    12-22-13 04:22 PM
  16. heymaggie's Avatar
    Are people who work in regulated industries like banking, finance, government, and the military consumers or not?
    If they are issued only Blackberries at work then they are not. If they have a choice of smartphones to use then they probably are.
    JeepBB likes this.
    12-22-13 04:31 PM
  17. GadgetTravel's Avatar
    If they are issued only Blackberries at work then they are not. If they have a choice of smartphones to use then they probably are.
    Right. BYOD is not enterprise.
    12-22-13 04:38 PM
  18. belfastdispatcher's Avatar
    Right. BYOD is not enterprise.
    It's not. It's the consumer bringing his own device at work.
    12-22-13 04:42 PM
  19. Dave Bourque's Avatar
    Once again, listen to the earnings call. Do your research. You will see that by outsourcing to Foxconn, BlackBerry is now free to focus on monetizing its software offerings and expanding solutions for the enterprise sector (government and corporate). At least Indonesia and about 7 other emerging markets, consumers will be able to purchase a BlackBerry.

    Poetry in Motion
    You do realize that this is a refocusing strategy. Meaning they won't abandon the consumer market but it will not be their focus in the time being. Hes putting focus where the most profit will come out eventually leading to bigger expansion. This is like starting at 0 and working your way up.
    12-22-13 05:00 PM
  20. badonkadonk's Avatar
    This thread is funny. Let's out it this way: Q5 was designed for "mid range" as it supports LTE but was cheaper than Q10. They definitely had a "Q3" in the works as well, like the lower-end Curve family of old. These are now going to be made by Foxconn instead of their US / German / Canadian design teams (the majority of which are part of that 4500 person layoff). Whatever remaining "in-house" design teams will work on replacements for Q10 and Z30. That's it. Two devices a year for Enterprise, maybe 1-2 a year for "consumer", which means entry tier, which means no LTE, WVGA screens, etc. That product won't sell in NA anyhow because no carrier will range it without LTE.
    techvisor likes this.
    12-22-13 05:52 PM
  21. berklon's Avatar
    My opinion is that if BlackBerry is to survive, it will regain popularity the same way it grew to begin with.

    Enterprise customers will force their employees to use a BlackBerry. Employees will go "Hey, this is a nice phone." will show it off to friends and family. Eventually friends and family will want to buy one.
    Those days are long over. Back in the day, Blackberry was the leader in this field, so everyone was willing to issue Blackberry's among their employees. Today, very few employers will force their employees to use Blackberries.

    BYOD is the solution now... and no one wants a BB. Employers see no reason to force it as BYOD is saving them money, and with iOS/Android - there are A LOT more productivity apps available for them. What will make employers abandon all that costs savings and productivity apps? Security? Nope, that won't do it. They'll spend some extra money implementing a MDM at the firm to secure things up - that's more than enough, and they don't have to give up the HUGE benefits of going BYOD.

    You can't turn back the clock.
    techvisor and JeepBB like this.
    12-22-13 05:55 PM
  22. badonkadonk's Avatar
    The BlackBerry started in "Enterprise" and then grew into "Prosumer" and finally "Consumer". The same thing will happen again. They are firing most of the people they brought on to develop 10+ handsets a year that were largely indistinguishable from each other. Consider "Bold" as Enterprise, "Torch" as Prosumer and "Curve" as Consumer (Pearl has been dead since before BB7). They are outsourcing the cheap phones to China and will only sell them in Emerging markets. They will keep high end in-house and sell these everywhere there is LTE support. There won't be "middle" phones anymore, which just means nothing like Q5 or Z10 again.
    12-22-13 06:01 PM
  23. anon5129477's Avatar
    The title of this thread is stupid. There are millions who fiercely demand a Blackberry Phone who are consumers, prosumers or whatever and we will be able to get it too.
    12-22-13 06:09 PM
  24. R Field's Avatar
    The Jakarta series is only set for release to 7 countries including Indonesia obviously and Chen said Malaysia. This is the smart play to go low end next first. They still need to sell off existing inventory of Z10/Q10/Q5 devices

    BlackBerry Z30 | 10.2.1.1055 | BBM Channel C0006E212
    12-22-13 06:35 PM
  25. sianto's Avatar
    Okay. So what exactly is an "enterprise" device today? A Q10 or a crippled version of a Q10 that no one would want to use?

    Posted via CB10
    There is already one! It's called the Q5!
    R Field likes this.
    12-22-13 06:44 PM
259 ... 34567 ...

Similar Threads

  1. Who here has owned a Q10 more than a month?
    By Alex Keb in forum BlackBerry Q10
    Replies: 106
    Last Post: 01-22-14, 07:41 AM
  2. Blackberry ID
    By Constantine94 in forum BlackBerry Z10
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12-26-13, 02:19 AM
  3. Good Bye Blackberry
    By rraj2k12 in forum BlackBerry 10 OS
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-22-13, 12:03 PM
  4. Use Android UI On BlackBerry 10!
    By nerdydaddyo in forum BlackBerry 10 OS
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 12-22-13, 11:44 AM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD