01-23-14 04:04 AM
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  1. m1kr0's Avatar
    As I said time and time again before, it is time for BlackBerry to start cashing in on privacy and security breaches. This is yet another example of privacy violations, but the funny thing is, it seems that this happens every day and the world simply is not interested. I have just seen this from Engadget and I'm asking: how much is too much? Is this ever going to stop?

    From Engadget: France slaps Google with $204,000 fine for violating privacy laws

    France slaps Google with $204,000 fine for violating privacy laws

    "Google's run in with France's privacy regulator has come to a rather unglamorous end. After months of deliberation, the National Commission on Computing and Freedom (CNIL) today hit the search giant with a 150,000 ($204,000) fine for breaking the law with its unified privacy policy. It's significantly less than the*300,000 fine CNIL threatened in September, but the regulator will compound Google's misery by requesting it to display a notice on its Google.fr homepage for two days explaining the decision. It's the latest in a long line of privacy-related investigations against Google: six European countries have launched probes into its*privacy policies, with Spain fining the company900,000 ($1.2 million)*just last month. Google has protested its innocence throughout, but with penalties coming in thick and fast, it could be forced to amend its policies once more.‎"

    STL 100-1 OS 10.2.1.1925
    01-08-14 01:34 PM
  2. Hilman76's Avatar
    That $204,000 fine is surely going to hurt their pocketbook
    extisis, fadmin and iNeoEon like this.
    01-08-14 01:41 PM
  3. m1kr0's Avatar
    They won't feel it. They likely don't even account for anything less than $10 million and probably wrote it off with a smile rubbing their hands for yet another "victory". The principle is they were found guilty of privacy violations and the fine is immaterial.

    Posted via CB10
    01-08-14 01:49 PM
  4. imz's Avatar
    Translation.

    Google pays approximately $204,000 to gain access to private information.
    01-08-14 01:56 PM
  5. m1kr0's Avatar
    Translation.

    Google pays approximately $204,000 to gain access to private information.

    Sounds like a good deal.
    Exactly my point. Data mining is their core business.

    STL 100-1 OS 10.2.1.1925
    bungaboy likes this.
    01-08-14 01:58 PM
  6. katiepea's Avatar
    That is seriously nothing of a fine, it won't matter to anyone, everyone knows their information is being sold if they use Google, most people don't care a bit. Google just like all corporations and banks, consider fines merely an investment, the fines never exceed what is gained by the company, and henceforth considered a viable strategy to utilize. If the margin is too thin then the company will lobby legislation to move the barriers away from the intent. This is even taught if you venture far enough into economic studies. It's amoral, and most individuals would do it too. If you had the opportunity to spend $10,000 and you knew it would yield you $500,000 for sure, you'd do it, even if it meant you were breaking the law and paying a fine. The difference is your fine as an individual would likely equate the gain and be accompanied by jail time because you don't have scores of lawyers of which their only goal is to keep you out of prison full time.

    How much is too much? It's not even close to a breaking point. As long as there are class distractions that keep the middle class feeling above poverty, aka manufactured consent, nobody will care.
    01-08-14 02:27 PM
  7. m1kr0's Avatar
    That is seriously nothing of a fine, it won't matter to anyone, everyone knows their information is being sold if they use Google, most people don't care a bit. Google just like all corporations and banks, consider fines merely an investment, the fines never exceed what is gained by the company, and henceforth considered a viable strategy to utilize. If the margin is too thin then the company will lobby legislation to move the barriers away from the intent. This is even taught if you venture far enough into economic studies. It's amoral, and most individuals would do it too. If you had the opportunity to spend $10,000 and you knew it would yield you $500,000 for sure, you'd do it, even if it meant you were breaking the law and paying a fine. The difference is your fine as an individual would likely equate the gain and be accompanied by jail time because you don't have scores of lawyers of which their only goal is to keep you out of prison full time.

    How much is too much? It's not even close to a breaking point. As long as there are class distractions that keep the middle class feeling above poverty, aka manufactured consent, nobody will care.
    Katie, I'm 100% with you there. The gullible end user is the victim and they merrily go along with a violation of personal privacy without truly understanding the implications. This is a sad state of affairs.

    Edit: I mean, when will people stand up and say: NO, you can't have it. It is private, it is personal and you do not have the right to infringe on one of the basic fundamentals of freedom and human rights.

    STL 100-1 OS 10.2.1.1925
    clickitykeys and bungaboy like this.
    01-08-14 02:38 PM
  8. bigbadben10's Avatar
    Huh...the most important thing to remember here is: I get free hangman apps on Android so I am blissfully happy and ignorant

    Arm yourselves people, the day of reckoning is surly coming!!!
    01-08-14 03:40 PM
  9. m1kr0's Avatar
    Huh...the most important thing to remember here is: I get free hangman apps on Android so I am blissfully happy and ignorant

    Arm yourselves people, the day of reckoning is surly coming!!!
    Yes Ben, but they are I'll informed, techno-virgins or simply plain stupid. They can't be bothered as long as there is instant gratification.

    STL 100-1 OS 10.2.1.1925
    bigbadben10 likes this.
    01-08-14 03:53 PM
  10. bigbadben10's Avatar
    Yes Ben, but they are I'll informed, techno-virgins or simply plain stupid. They can't be bothered as long as there is instant gratification.

    STL 100-1 OS 10.2.1.1925
    I would go with "Plain Stupid" and completely "Unaware", those two go hand in hand....people love being spoon fed with pablum these days...its easier that way!
    01-08-14 04:00 PM
  11. LuvULongTime's Avatar
    Which explains the Nexus' $350 price tag. Take a loss on the HW to get the phone into someone hands, and then mine their data!
    H_O_Boomaye likes this.
    01-08-14 04:07 PM
  12. sixpacker's Avatar
    That is seriously nothing of a fine, it won't matter to anyone, everyone knows their information is being sold if they use Google, most people don't care a bit. Google just like all corporations and banks, consider fines merely an investment, the fines never exceed what is gained by the company, and henceforth considered a viable strategy to utilize. If the margin is too thin then the company will lobby legislation to move the barriers away from the intent. This is even taught if you venture far enough into economic studies. It's amoral, and most individuals would do it too. If you had the opportunity to spend $10,000 and you knew it would yield you $500,000 for sure, you'd do it, even if it meant you were breaking the law and paying a fine. The difference is your fine as an individual would likely equate the gain and be accompanied by jail time because you don't have scores of lawyers of which their only goal is to keep you out of prison full time.

    How much is too much? It's not even close to a breaking point. As long as there are class distractions that keep the middle class feeling above poverty, aka manufactured consent, nobody will care.
    Multinationals have no moral compass, just a soleless search for improving the bottom line. Whether it's tax avoidance or trading subscriber information it's just another day at the office. Couple this with their lobbying control over politicians and we have a building crisis over democracy and freedom.
    kbz1960 likes this.
    01-08-14 04:13 PM
  13. breakingpoint0's Avatar
    I have been seeing this more and more and it makes me want to switch away from Google. I don't use their phones but I use their email. Where can one switch to that is more concerned with our privacy and not selling our data? Microsoft? Yahoo? Host your own?
    01-08-14 04:43 PM
  14. MERCDROID's Avatar
    Katie, I'm 100% with you there. The gullible end user is the victim and they merrily go along with a violation of personal privacy without truly understanding the implications. This is a sad state of affairs.

    Edit: I mean, when will people stand up and say: NO, you can't have it. It is private, it is personal and you do not have the right to infringe on one of the basic fundamentals of freedom and human rights.

    STL 100-1 OS 10.2.1.1925
    Honest question: Are you implying that everyone that uses Google's ecosystem is a gullible end user?
    Donvald, shief24 and MC_A_DOT like this.
    01-08-14 05:01 PM
  15. ray689's Avatar
    Which explains the Nexus' $350 price tag. Take a loss on the HW to get the phone into someone hands, and then mine their data!
    That explains android as a whole. Give away free to every phone vendor that will take it and get access to what you really want which is data.

    Posted via CB10
    bigbadben10 likes this.
    01-08-14 05:04 PM
  16. Hilman76's Avatar
    Oh noes, they might find out my high score in Candy Crush or see a picture of my cat on Instagram lol, obviously millions of people a day don't care and are flocking to Android.
    01-08-14 05:14 PM
  17. CrackberryQ's Avatar
    That is seriously nothing of a fine, it won't matter to anyone, everyone knows their information is being sold if they use Google, most people don't care a bit. Google just like all corporations and banks, consider fines merely an investment, the fines never exceed what is gained by the company, and henceforth considered a viable strategy to utilize. If the margin is too thin then the company will lobby legislation to move the barriers away from the intent. This is even taught if you venture far enough into economic studies. It's amoral, and most individuals would do it too. If you had the opportunity to spend $10,000 and you knew it would yield you $500,000 for sure, you'd do it, even if it meant you were breaking the law and paying a fine. The difference is your fine as an individual would likely equate the gain and be accompanied by jail time because you don't have scores of lawyers of which their only goal is to keep you out of prison full time.

    How much is too much? It's not even close to a breaking point. As long as there are class distractions that keep the middle class feeling above poverty, aka manufactured consent, nobody will care.
    Katie always love ur posts! What do u do btw?

    Posted via CB10
    kbz1960 likes this.
    01-08-14 05:17 PM
  18. ray689's Avatar
    Oh noes, they might find out my high score in Candy Crush or see a picture of my cat on Instagram lol, obviously millions of people a day don't care and are flocking to Android.
    Prime candidate number 1 right here.

    Posted via CB10
    01-08-14 06:55 PM
  19. kfh227's Avatar
    That $204,000 fine is surely going to hurt their pocketbook
    Anchor in terms of the country of France only.

    Posted via CB10
    01-08-14 07:15 PM
  20. katiepea's Avatar
    Honest question: Are you implying that everyone that uses Google's ecosystem is a gullible end user?
    No, I'm saying it's either that, or they don't care, the difference is irrelevant as the result is the same.
    MERCDROID, kbz1960 and MC_A_DOT like this.
    01-08-14 07:19 PM
  21. MERCDROID's Avatar
    No, I'm saying it's either that, or they don't care, the difference is irrelevant as the result is the same.
    Ok, that's fair. Trust me, I know the vast majority of people either don't care to have any privacy, or don't care that what little privacy they have is possibly being bought and sold. As a primarily Android user, I know that Google stores, uses, and sells some of my information. That's why I'm smart about what information I let them have access to (and, I'm sure, I'm not the only Android user that isn't privy to what information I'm willing to diverge to Google, fan or not).

    But, in response to the other poster, it's not really fair to isolate one ecosystem and call all of its users gullible. At some point in time, by accessing the internet, we're all giving up some elements of our privacy, whether we like it or not, and/or whether we're aware of it or not.

    Just my opinion.
    01-08-14 07:32 PM
  22. raccoon210's Avatar
    I have been seeing this more and more and it makes me want to switch away from Google. I don't use their phones but I use their email. Where can one switch to that is more concerned with our privacy and not selling our data? Microsoft? Yahoo? Host your own?



    I use outlook and would highly recommend it





    Sent from my RM-915_nam_usa_228 using Tapatalk
    MERCDROID and LP_Rigg like this.
    01-08-14 07:39 PM
  23. BobWalker's Avatar
    Google will pay that with change from the sofas in the employee lounge. It's irrelevant.

    Some people care about privacy, others don't. BlackBerry should be marketing to those who do.
    ray689, MERCDROID and MC_A_DOT like this.
    01-08-14 09:43 PM
  24. ray689's Avatar
    Yes, Google likely made 5 times that amount in the time it took the original poster to type up the thread title.

    Posted via CB10
    01-08-14 09:53 PM
  25. m1kr0's Avatar
    Honest question: Are you implying that everyone that uses Google's ecosystem is a gullible end user?
    Not at all. There are people that are cautious to make sure that their personal information and online activities are secure as best as possible but they are in the minority by far. The rest don't know better or they know and still don't worry about it. Just because a large portion of the population falls in the latter category, it doesn't give anyone the right for private or confidential information to be collected and used. The article is all about Google being found guilty of doing that and the majority of users affected by their action were blissfully unaware - those users affected probably still are.

    STL 100-1 OS 10.2.1.1925
    MERCDROID likes this.
    01-08-14 11:10 PM
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