1. cbvinh's Avatar
    BlackBerry's Famous Last Words At 2007 iPhone Launch: 'We'll Be Fine' - Forbes

    BlackBerry's co-CEO's reaction to the iPhone wasn't so completely out there...

    "BlackBerrys executives were at first in awe of Apples ability to pack so many features into one phone, but they werent impressed enough to race to build a consumer device that was just as useful and aesthetically pleasing.

    Instead they comforted themselves with reminders that the iPhones keyboard was difficult to use and the battery life, terrible. BlackBerry was leading the pack, after all."


    They certainly didn't see the potential of the larger consumer market, probably because consumers were buying BlackBerry's without any push from them. They certainly didn't anticipate that people would buy something that was a utility device as a status symbol ("aesthetically pleasing") and give up easy typing and long battery life.

    "That January day as Lazaridis watched Jobs unveil the first iPhone, he was shocked to see the CEO of AT&T-owned Cingular Wireless join Jobs on the stage to announce a multiyear contract with Apple.

    Surely all those downloads of music and videos onto iPhones would collapse the network."


    They were right about that. AT&T's network crawled with iPhone's on it. They didn't anticipate that people didn't care about data compression.

    "From the book:

    The next day Mr. Lazaridis grabbed his co-CEO Jim Balsillie at the office and pulled him in front of a computer.

    Jim, I want you to watch this, he said, pointing to a webcast of the iPhone unveiling. They put a full Web browser on that thing. The carriers arent letting us put a full browser on our products.

    Mr. Balsillies first thought was RIM was losing AT&T as a customer.

    Apples got a better deal, Mr. Balsillie said. We were never allowed that. The U.S. market is going to be tougher.

    These guys are really, really good, Mr. Lazaridis replied. This is different.

    Its OKwell be fine, Mr. Balsillie responded."


    Sure seems like Lazaridis knew what was coming... thus the purchase of QNX, TAT, etc. Balsillie sounds like he didn't see any competition.

    "The iPhone didnt look like a threat to the companys core business. It wasnt secure, COO Larry Conlee told the books authors. It had rapid battery drain and a lousy [digital] keyboard."

    They didn't see that the general public didn't care anything about security, battery drain or typing speed... things that people care about now... well, minus security.
    jake simmons3 and eldricho like this.
    05-26-15 08:27 PM
  2. lnichols's Avatar
    Balsillie was more concerned about getting an NHL franchise than running a company. He should have handed off the reigns, retired and bought a hockey team instead of staying and driving the company into the ground.

    Posted via Z30
    05-26-15 09:05 PM
  3. early2bed's Avatar
    It sounds like BlackBerry considered Verizon and other carriers to be their customer and kept delivering phones that would be frugal with bandwidth while Apple appealed to the end users and used their data usage to bludgeon the carrier into investing in their networks.
    05-26-15 09:31 PM
  4. AnimalPak200's Avatar
    It sounds like BlackBerry considered Verizon and other carriers to be their customer and kept delivering phones that would be frugal with bandwidth while Apple appealed to the end users and used their data usage to bludgeon the carrier into investing in their networks.
    I think that's about right. They were equipment suppliers for the carriers, which at that point required data efficient equipment. The company was never made to be a glitzy consumer focused affair,.. and it never really learned how to be one.

    So maybe they will settle back into a 'middle-ware' role, becoming once again a 'supplier'.

    Posted via CB10
    05-26-15 09:41 PM
  5. lnichols's Avatar
    It sounds like BlackBerry considered Verizon and other carriers to be their customer and kept delivering phones that would be frugal with bandwidth while Apple appealed to the end users and used their data usage to bludgeon the carrier into investing in their networks.
    The iPhone actually pushed rapid advancements in network technology. Apple didn't ask what carriers wanted, they asked what the end user wanted, and what Apple's vision for mobility was. Once people had a phone that could do more than email and BBM, they wanted to do more. Carriers realized voice and text was becoming a commodity, and data is where the money was at. BlackBerry didn't expect LTE to get here so quickly and we're caught with their pants down. They were forced to focus on "emerging markets" with horrible networks that BBOS was built to work well on and slowly worked a solution for the developed world.

    Posted via Z30
    05-26-15 09:56 PM
  6. djchrisluna's Avatar
    Well atleast it wasn't as bad at what Steve ballmer said when first asked about the iphone years back.

    Posted via CB10
    05-27-15 02:55 AM
  7. bakron1's Avatar
    The success of the iPhone was an amazing thing and the folks at Apple also had the vision of putting their products into the public schools and almost every young person today has had exposure to an Apple product in one way or another.

    So once the iPhone came out and Jobs started to integrate IOS with Mac OS, it was only the natural thing for folks who already have been using a Mac for some time now to migrate to the IOS platform and this rest is history.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    05-27-15 04:50 AM
  8. ozdezignr's Avatar
    Slow news day, this all happened 8 years ago...
    andy957 and web99 like this.
    05-27-15 05:52 AM
  9. bobby1966's Avatar
    History,not news.

    Via my Z30 on the Telus network
    05-27-15 06:42 AM
  10. Gajja's Avatar
    BlackBerry's Famous Last Words At 2007 iPhone Launch: 'We'll Be Fine' - Forbes

    BlackBerry's co-CEO's reaction to the iPhone wasn't so completely out there...

    "BlackBerry’s executives were at first in awe of Apple’s ability to pack so many features into one phone, but they weren’t impressed enough to race to build a consumer device that was just as useful and aesthetically pleasing.

    Instead they comforted themselves with reminders that the iPhone’s keyboard was difficult to use and the battery life, terrible. BlackBerry was leading the pack, after all."


    They certainly didn't see the potential of the larger consumer market, probably because consumers were buying BlackBerry's without any push from them. They certainly didn't anticipate that people would buy something that was a utility device as a status symbol ("aesthetically pleasing") and give up easy typing and long battery life.

    "That January day as Lazaridis watched Jobs unveil the first iPhone, he was shocked to see the CEO of AT&T-owned Cingular Wireless join Jobs on the stage to announce a multiyear contract with Apple.

    Surely all those downloads of music and videos onto iPhones would collapse the network."


    They were right about that. AT&T's network crawled with iPhone's on it. They didn't anticipate that people didn't care about data compression.

    "From the book:

    The next day Mr. Lazaridis grabbed his co-CEO Jim Balsillie at the office and pulled him in front of a computer.

    “Jim, I want you to watch this,” he said, pointing to a webcast of the iPhone unveiling. “They put a full Web browser on that thing. The carriers aren’t letting us put a full browser on our products.”

    Mr. Balsillie’s first thought was RIM was losing AT&T as a customer.

    “Apple’s got a better deal,” Mr. Balsillie said. “We were never allowed that. The U.S. market is going to be tougher.”

    “These guys are really, really good,” Mr. Lazaridis replied. “This is different.”

    “It’s OK—we’ll be fine,” Mr. Balsillie responded."


    Sure seems like Lazaridis knew what was coming... thus the purchase of QNX, TAT, etc. Balsillie sounds like he didn't see any competition.

    "The iPhone didn’t look like a threat to the company’s core business. “It wasn’t secure,” COO Larry Conlee told the book’s authors. “It had rapid battery drain and a lousy [digital] keyboard.”"

    They didn't see that the general public didn't care anything about security, battery drain or typing speed... things that people care about now... well, minus security.
    What about the Android system? Probably a bigger threat in much of the world. The Apple sucess depends a bit on which country / territory you live in as to whether it's the big thing or not.
    05-27-15 06:59 AM
  11. cbvinh's Avatar
    What about the Android system? Probably a bigger threat in much of the world. The Apple sucess depends a bit on which country / territory you live in as to whether it's the big thing or not.
    True, but the article is about BlackBerry's response to seeing the iPhone for the first time.
    05-27-15 12:25 PM
  12. tchocky77's Avatar
    What about the Android system? Probably a bigger threat in much of the world.
    Well,...for historical perspective,...we can look at Google's response to the iPhone...

    http://www.theatlantic.com/technolog...ndroid/282479/

    Up until the iPhone, Android was intended to work on, get this,....a PKB device! That's stunning to me. Of course, after seeing Jobs at that first demo,...they through everything out and started all over.
    So,...they were considerably more affected by what they saw than Blackberry was.

    And that has been to their benefit.
    05-27-15 12:40 PM
  13. cbvinh's Avatar
    Well,...for historical perspective,...we can look at Google's response to the iPhone...

    The Day Google Had to 'Start Over' on Android - The Atlantic

    Up until the iPhone, Android was intended to work on, get this,....a PKB device! That's stunning to me. Of course, after seeing Jobs at that first demo,...they through everything out and started all over.
    So,...they were considerably more affected by what they saw than Blackberry was.

    And that has been to their benefit.
    BlackBerry probably couldn't switch direction overnight. They had a sizable market share they just couldn't alienate immediately. (Look at all the posts from people who still want BBOS. It's not like they're just asking for all the features of BBOS in BB10, but they want BBOS itself.) Google could do whatever it wanted. Android hadn't launched yet.

    It's not like BlackBerry didn't see a change was needed. They were just really slow at executing it.
    05-27-15 12:59 PM
  14. techvisor's Avatar
    Well atleast it wasn't as bad at what Steve ballmer said when first asked about the iphone years back.

    Posted via CB10
    True but they did eventually drop the price of iPhone.

    It sounds like BlackBerry considered Verizon and other carriers to be their customer and kept delivering phones that would be frugal with bandwidth while Apple appealed to the end users and used their data usage to bludgeon the carrier into investing in their networks.
    That's true. Back then the carriers used to determine the types, features, and cost of phones. They only saw phones as ways to get people locked into contracts and get service revenue. They had little respect for the OEM's. Apple changed that with the iPhone, and ever since the carriers want a "flagship" device that will drive sales demand. Power has shifted from the carrier to manufacturer, and I for one am glad this has happened.

    The iPhone actually pushed rapid advancements in network technology.
    Posted via Z30
    Absolutely and we all have benefited from this. Apple basically accelerated the inevitable, which is a much higher demand for network capacity, due to the trends of miniaturization, mobility, and content consumption. I don't think it was ever a question of if but when cellular networks would need massive upgrades.
    Last edited by techvisor; 05-27-15 at 03:47 PM.
    05-27-15 03:04 PM
  15. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    The success of the iPhone was an amazing thing and the folks at Apple also had the vision of putting their products into the public schools and almost every young person today has had exposure to an Apple product in one way or another.

    So once the iPhone came out and Jobs started to integrate IOS with Mac OS, it was only the natural thing for folks who already have been using a Mac for some time now to migrate to the IOS platform and this rest is history.
    It also helped that people had iPods. I'd say the success of the iPod helped the iPhone catch on more than the Mac. There were more Windows users than Mac users who got iPhones, but many of those folks had iPods previously.

    Sent from my Moto X using Tapatalk
    05-27-15 03:13 PM
  16. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    iTunes is just as big a part of Apple's success with the iPhone.....

    And an example of what BlackBerry was missing for so long, and never really implemented in a consumer friendly way.
    m1kr0 likes this.
    05-27-15 03:26 PM
  17. abwan11's Avatar
    What's really funny.....The Apple products and brand in its early days was no different than it is viewed today. Apple II, macintosh etc were legendary innovations when released and yet they lost out to IBM and Microsoft. ..Go figure,. It was something that I couldn't understand at the time. Having owned an apple II, the competition imo wasn't even close to apples products design, ease of use, plug and play etc. And yet they lost. Jim and Mike probably remember those days and saw the iPhone as another McIntosh.

    Posted via CB10
    05-27-15 06:53 PM
  18. cbvinh's Avatar
    the competition imo wasn't even close to apples products design, ease of use, plug and play etc.
    The competition, except for the Amiga's, you mean...
    05-27-15 07:39 PM
  19. AnimalPak200's Avatar
    It also helped that people had iPods. I'd say the success of the iPod helped the iPhone catch on more than the Mac. There were more Windows users than Mac users who got iPhones, but many of those folks had iPods previously.

    Sent from my Moto X using Tapatalk
    Absolutely. When Jobs introduced the iPhone he said:

    "An iPod, a phone, and an internet communicator."

    The iPod was probably much more significant to their initial resurgence, if not revenue-wise, then definitely popularity-wise.

    I know for me, that early iPod (which replaced a Sony mini disc player) was my first Apple product. I've never had Macs (or any other Apple product), but always had an iPod ever since.

    Posted via CB10
    Last edited by AnimalPak200; 05-27-15 at 09:14 PM.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    05-27-15 08:33 PM
  20. Bfalcon1's Avatar
    Apple never asked the end user what they wanted...consumers don't know what they want. Apple gave them something they now need...Blackberry got fat. A lot of companies rest on their laurels. Change always comes...those who don't lose...

    Posted via CB10
    05-27-15 08:41 PM
  21. FSeverino's Avatar
    So... they are saying that the 'we will be fine' almost TEN years ago was some crazy statement?

    Im sorry... how many tech companies rule the world for decades at a time? How many fizzle after 10 years?
    The majority of tech companies dont last more then 10 years. Sure BB was a huge company, but no one stays on top forever

    Having 'survived' for almost 10 years when Apple released the BlackBerry killer is actually a testament to BlackBerry.
    05-27-15 10:53 PM
  22. abwan11's Avatar
    The competition, except for the Amiga's, you mean...
    lol, yeah your right. ... ahh the gud ol days...vic 20s were like skateboards, everyone had one or had access to one.
    05-28-15 03:30 PM
  23. prplhze2000's Avatar
    This is what happens when you have co-cEOs and decisive action is required.

    Posted via CB10
    05-30-15 05:56 PM

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