11-25-14 01:03 AM
66 123
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  1. Carrtman's Avatar
    There is nothing wrong with being stuck in the past, remember how some companies used to talk bs about the "antiquidated desktop, mouse and keyboard in favour of the allmighty touch ?" well even a company as big as Ford has backpedalled and introduced physical buttons again, because they are much easier to use for car drivers.

    BBs biggest mistake has been trying to be like all the other smartphone manufacturers, while not taking advises from their classic users.

    BB should and will try to create their own niche, they are the best at offering physical keyboards plus security.
    10-31-14 11:45 AM
  2. RyanGermann's Avatar
    The premise in the quoted excerpt is flawed because a) no, it's not always about apps, and b) switching from an old OD like BBOS to a modern OS like Android or iOS may be a "one way trip" (i.e. it's hard to go back to BBOS from a modern OS) but switching from a QWERTY + touchscreen to a full-slab touchscreen is NOT a one way trip.... plenty of people who switched to full touchscreen devices enjoyed the novelty of what that form factor and those form factors bring, but once that novelty wears off, they're stuck with an unsatisfactory experience.

    I echo the "720 x 720 is too small" but the solution to that isn't sticking with Android or iOS, it's for BlackBerry to put out the slider with all the benefits of a large touch screen and the full utility of the keyboard and trackpad... as the Classic is to the Bold, this new Slider would be to the Torch, giving maximum choice and filling out the portfolio.

    Also, saying the Classic isn't the "right solution" without referencing the user experience of the Passport (effectively, the Passport isn't square, it's a landscape screen that is even taller for more utility) is a "lie of omission". If acknowledging the Passport's UX undermines his "BlackBerry is falling into old bad habits" point, then better not mention it, right?

    It's the same mentality that led the world from the excellence of 1920 x 1200 screens to the mediocrity of 1920 x 1080 screens because ***** consumers didn't like the black bars above and below the screen when they viewed 1920 x 1080 content on 1920 x 1200 screens... the manufacturers responded by giving consumers what they stupidly want. If he can't see that a 1440 x 1440 screen isn't just a "square" but rather is a 1440 x 960 landscape screen that's even taller, or a 960 x 1440 screen that's even wider, then, well, that's what I expect from most tech writers today. They have a point to make, clicks to bait, and facts and insight be darned.
    10-31-14 11:50 AM
  3. clickitykeys's Avatar
    ..., that's what I expect from most tech writers today. They have a point to make, clicks to bait, and facts and insight be darned.
    Scarily accurate observation. I can't say if tech writing was always so bad, but there is no doubt that it sucks. This epidemic of insight-free journalism starts at the very top, all the way from Walt Mossberg, to David Pogue, to the hispters at Gizmodo, Engadget and CNET.


    Q10/10.3.1.821
    10-31-14 08:02 PM
  4. Clanked's Avatar
    This guy is a moron. He hates BlackBerry and can't think logically. Just ignore him.

    Z30 (10.3)
    11-01-14 03:05 AM
  5. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    The premise in the quoted excerpt is flawed because a) no, it's not always about apps, and b) switching from an old OD like BBOS to a modern OS like Android or iOS may be a "one way trip" (i.e. it's hard to go back to BBOS from a modern OS) but switching from a QWERTY + touchscreen to a full-slab touchscreen is NOT a one way trip.... plenty of people who switched to full touchscreen devices enjoyed the novelty of what that form factor and those form factors bring, but once that novelty wears off, they're stuck with an unsatisfactory experience.

    I echo the "720 x 720 is too small" but the solution to that isn't sticking with Android or iOS, it's for BlackBerry to put out the slider with all the benefits of a large touch screen and the full utility of the keyboard and trackpad... as the Classic is to the Bold, this new Slider would be to the Torch, giving maximum choice and filling out the portfolio.

    Also, saying the Classic isn't the "right solution" without referencing the user experience of the Passport (effectively, the Passport isn't square, it's a landscape screen that is even taller for more utility) is a "lie of omission". If acknowledging the Passport's UX undermines his "BlackBerry is falling into old bad habits" point, then better not mention it, right?

    It's the same mentality that led the world from the excellence of 1920 x 1200 screens to the mediocrity of 1920 x 1080 screens because ***** consumers didn't like the black bars above and below the screen when they viewed 1920 x 1080 content on 1920 x 1200 screens... the manufacturers responded by giving consumers what they stupidly want. If he can't see that a 1440 x 1440 screen isn't just a "square" but rather is a 1440 x 960 landscape screen that's even taller, or a 960 x 1440 screen that's even wider, then, well, that's what I expect from most tech writers today. They have a point to make, clicks to bait, and facts and insight be darned.
    Ryan, you are often quite critical of BlackBerry, I know :-)

    Hats off for this great summary about screen sizes, you really nailed it!
    Wow.

    Exactly my sentiment about the Passport, right from the start when I first saw it, it's a landscape device with extra vertical space!



    ? ? ? Passposted via CB Chen ? ? ?
    11-01-14 06:41 AM
  6. farusa's Avatar
    The track pad keyboard adds to the landscape experience as well. Being able to move your view up or down or right to left without touching the screen is the ultimate.

    Posted via CB10
    11-01-14 08:07 AM
  7. bungaboy's Avatar
    My take on the article author is that he has shorted BB stock and is now bashing the company to force the stock lower. That, or the article is sponsored by the iThing or alike.

    I managed to read only a portion of the article before wanting to puke. Then again, for the most part, honest journalism doesn't exist anymore so I guess I shouldn't be surprised.
    Yup. Shorty at work as usual. History lessons.
    11-01-14 08:14 AM
  8. BACK-2-BLACK's Avatar
    The problem is that most 9900 users do not want to use BB10 otherwise they would have jumped on the Q10 tool belt or not.
    Seems like most 9900 users didn't want the Q10 because it didn't have the familiar tool belt/trackpad.... some were skeptical about the new OS, but I think the lack of a toolbelt and overall asthetics put them off.

    Hopefully the "Classic" changes that. Either way, not much choice now if you are looking for a New BlackBerry device like the previous 9900. This seems to be the closest.
    11-01-14 08:18 AM
  9. BB_Junky's Avatar
    So you guys are hating on a Forbes article because it doesnt praise a device that you love. If you could just see past your nose, you would see a modern world with modern needs and BBRY has to step up or step aside....
    11-01-14 12:20 PM
  10. RyanGermann's Avatar
    So you guys are hating on a Forbes article because it doesnt praise a device that you love. If you could just see past your nose, you would see a modern world with modern needs and BBRY has to step up or step aside....
    He's not criticizing the device he's criticizing the company and the overall device strategy and not bringing all the evidence into his assessment: don't mischaracterise our criticism of the article in the same way that he is mischaracterising BlackBerry's design portfolio.
    11-01-14 03:48 PM
  11. spikesolie's Avatar
    So you guys are hating on a Forbes article because it doesnt praise a device that you love. If you could just see past your nose, you would see a modern world with modern needs and BBRY has to step up or step aside....
    Are you incapable of comprehension, reading or what?

    Posted from zee flicking coolest smartphone evah!
    11-02-14 01:27 AM
  12. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Exactly!

    The decline of app-mania is inevitable and people will start to want phones that just work for them. So if BlackBerry can offer the necessary apps and a great, productive experience otherwise then they should be in a good position. Let the fans of fart apps and candy games play with their toys, the rest of us will keep using these tools for what they are meant for

    BB for Life
    LOL.
    techvisor likes this.
    11-02-14 01:46 AM
  13. MarsupilamiX's Avatar
    He's not criticizing the device he's criticizing the company and the overall device strategy and not bringing all the evidence into his assessment: don't mischaracterise our criticism of the article in the same way that he is mischaracterising BlackBerry's design portfolio.
    I agree with the thesis that BlackBerry is still stuck in the past and hasn't learned what devices and what strategy they should adopt to finally be successful again with their handset business.
    I don't agree with the arguments presented though.

    Posted via CB10
    Last edited by MarsupilamiX; 11-02-14 at 04:31 AM.
    techvisor likes this.
    11-02-14 04:06 AM
  14. spikesolie's Avatar
    I agree with the thesis that BlackBerry is still stuck in the past and hasn't learned what devices and what strategy they should adopt to finally be successful again with their handset business.
    I don't agree with the arguments presented though.

    Posted via CB10
    Passport has proven you wrong. If you believe they aren't chasing apple or Samsung, then their strategy makes sense..but It doesn't seem you people get it

    Posted from zee flicking coolest smartphone evah!
    11-02-14 11:24 AM
  15. MarsupilamiX's Avatar
    Passport has proven you wrong. If you believe they aren't chasing apple or Samsung, then their strategy makes sense..but It doesn't seem you people get it

    Posted from zee flicking coolest smartphone evah!
    Passport hasn't proven anything, dafuq?
    Until we have seen the real sale numbers and afterwards the sustained long term sales nothing has changed.

    Do you think that the Passport being out of stock in the beginning of the production run proves anything?

    Nothing has changed for the handset business since the Z10 launch.
    It's still not profitable.
    The marketshare is still abysmal.

    Or did the Passport singlehandedly change that since it launched? No?
    (I mean, it won't happen when the Classic joins the portfolio either, so yeah... Call me when the keyboard phones have a sizable share of the market?)

    Posted via CB10
    techvisor and pakcikkayo like this.
    11-02-14 12:11 PM
  16. RyanGermann's Avatar
    Until we have seen the real sale numbers and afterwards the sustained long term sales nothing has changed.
    The only definition of success that is legitimate is that of the BlackBerry Ltd. Board of Directors. Everything else is academic. Device sales and market share statistics aren't the whole picture so watch your quarterly statements from the board and you'll know if Blackberry is being successful or not.

    Posted via CB10
    11-02-14 04:30 PM
  17. SK122387's Avatar
    The author is stuck in the past.

    He doesn't understand that BlackBerry has taken a new direction, away from consumers.

    It's like the author has been under a rock the last year, where John Chen has laid out his enterprise-focused plans and begun to execute pretty precisely.


    Posted via CB10
    clickitykeys likes this.
    11-02-14 04:58 PM
  18. world traveler and former ceo's Avatar
    Pretty much any article that isn't supportive of BlackBerry is biased.

    Posted using my Z10 via CB10
    Assuming you were not sarcastic lol

    Not true... only those that display such a lack of intelligence or competence or those that clearly show a predetermined bias (ie,someone with an agenda... ( as a short seller, someone heavily invested in a competitor's product...Apple, and so on)... Such that their "expert opinions" hold no credibility.... most journalists or bloggers fall in that category...

    Those that can... DO. Those that can't... BLOG! Write, offer investment advice, lol ..... it's true.

    Well, I wouldn't trust any of them to park my car!!! lol

    Luckily, Blackberry has a very experienced and shrewd CEO...



    Posted via CB10
    11-02-14 11:56 PM
  19. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Meh.

    Bottom line? Nobody should be so invested in a commercial device that a divergent opinion incites rage.

    One need not hang on the every word of a tech writer for validation.

    On the one hand, we claim to be so set apart from the crowd, but furtively seek the approval of said crowd every time a device is released.
    11-03-14 12:03 AM
  20. MarsupilamiX's Avatar
    The only definition of success that is legitimate is that of the BlackBerry Ltd. Board of Directors. Everything else is academic. Device sales and market share statistics aren't the whole picture so watch your quarterly statements from the board and you'll know if Blackberry is being successful or not.

    Posted via CB10
    I think that you misunderstood what a publicly traded company represents.
    I also wonder if you didn't realise that "success" being a comparative measure, makes a company like BlackBerry easily comparable through a number of different factors.
    (competitors, being able to generate at least 1$ of profit, past performance etc etc etc)

    Posted via CB10
    11-03-14 01:39 AM
  21. THBW's Avatar
    [QUOTE=MarsupilamiX;11041273]I think that you misunderstood what a publicly traded company represents.
    I also wonder if you didn't realise that "success" being a comparative measure, makes a company like BlackBerry easily comparable through a number of different factors.
    (competitors, being able to generate at least 1$ of profit, past performance etc etc etc)

    Posted via CB10[/QUOTE
    Didn't understand a single thing you said. Success isn't a comparative business term, it is a relative subjective term based on preference. I think the point your trying to make is that public corporations are allowed access to market capital in exchange for profit generation.

    Posted via CB10
    11-03-14 06:46 AM
  22. MarsupilamiX's Avatar
    What I meant is that a publicly traded company isn't free to define success by itself.
    Success of a company or lack thereof, will be reflected in a number of things.
    An extreme lack of success, no matter how the management defined "success", or the negligent destruction of shareholder value can easily result in a law suit against the company/management.

    Secondly, the word "success" is a relative word. Without comparing 2 companies with each other, it's impossible to define which one is successful or unsuccessful for example.
    Another one would be the comparison between the actual state of a company and the desired state of where the management wants to take the company. Through juxtaposing those, the notion of "success" gets its meaning.
    (This is what I meant with it being a comparative measure)

    You are partly correct though. I implicitly stated that the definition of a publicly traded company limits the possible definitions of "success" before.
    I did it explicitly now and I hope that cleared up your confusion.


    Posted via CB10
    Last edited by MarsupilamiX; 11-03-14 at 09:36 AM.
    11-03-14 07:24 AM
  23. Banco's Avatar
    What I meant is that a publicly traded company isn't free to define success by itself.
    Success of a company or lack thereof, will be reflected in a number of things.
    An extreme lack of success, no matter how the management defined "success", or the negligent destruction of shareholder value can easily result in a law suit against the company/management.

    Secondly, the word "success" is a relative word. Without comparing 2 companies with each other, it's impossible to define which one is successful or unsuccessful for example.
    Another one would be the comparison between the actual state of a company and the desired state of the management. Through juxtaposing those, the notion of "success" becomes its meaning.
    (This is what I meant with it being a comparative measure)

    Posted via CB10
    I know what you're saying, but you've got to be careful when doing the comparison.

    In my business there are larger companies doing the same sort of thing, and success for me wouldn't even be a zit on the backside of the bigger companies doing the same type of stuff. And I really couldn't care less what they think, in any way whatsoever. Success is defined in terms of what it means to my shareholders (i.e. Me) not what it means to anyone else.

    Posted via CB10
    MarsupilamiX and RyanGermann like this.
    11-03-14 07:30 AM
  24. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    I know what you're saying, but you've got to be careful when doing the comparison.

    In my business there are larger companies doing the same sort of thing, and success for me wouldn't even be a zit on the backside of the bigger companies doing the same type of stuff. And I really couldn't care less what they think, in any way whatsoever. Success is defined in terms of what it means to my shareholders (i.e. Me) not what it means to anyone else.

    Posted via CB10
    At the risk of speaking for him, I think you guys are saying the exact same thing. Success is measured by the shareholders.
    MarsupilamiX likes this.
    11-03-14 07:37 AM
  25. MarsupilamiX's Avatar
    I know what you're saying, but you've got to be careful when doing the comparison.

    In my business there are larger companies doing the same sort of thing, and success for me wouldn't even be a zit on the backside of the bigger companies doing the same type of stuff. And I really couldn't care less what they think, in any way whatsoever. Success is defined in terms of what it means to my shareholders (i.e. Me) not what it means to anyone else.

    Posted via CB10
    Ultimately the accountability lies in your hands, that is totally correct.

    But let's imagine (and I don't think that this is the case and I obviously hope that it'll never be the case) that your company hasn't left the reds in 10 years.
    In my country, the tax office will then send you a letter that they appreciate your efforts, but that you can stop deducting taxes on everything that has to do with said company.
    Simply said, in such a scenario, you were too unsuccessful for the tax office.

    Another example:
    You are around the break even point for 10 years now. That's probably successful enough for the tax office, and maybe even for yourself, but pretty much everyone else would just discount your success as being meaningless, because the whole point of a business, to make meaningful amounts of money, hasn't been met.

    Which doesn't mean that I don't agree with you.
    When your business is successful, and you more or less meet your defined target, you are obviously successful, in your own right, and screw the others.
    Publicly traded companies sadly/luckily don't have it that easy though.

    At the risk of speaking for him, I think you guys are saying the exact same thing. Success is measured by the shareholders.
    Haha.
    Well yeah, in less words one could say it like that as well.

    Posted via CB10
    11-03-14 07:40 AM
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