02-14-15 11:36 PM
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  1. berry4life99's Avatar
    It's clear to me I wasn't being clear. This is a second half to the previous post I wrote about the health of BlackBerry. Healthy company first: making money, can afford to advertise, able to take some risks. I'm not even trying to put all eggs in a single basket. I did that with both the Storm and the Z10. I will not make that same mistake. I'd just like to see people look at a BlackBerry and not be shocked like they witnessed a dodo crossing their path.

    Posted via CB10
    02-10-15 11:08 AM
  2. eyesopen1111's Avatar
    Actually, I think it is the road to a return to profitability. It will finally demonstrate that BlackBerry still has the ability to compete and that they are a growing concern, instead a of a company that slowly dying.

     Posted using my Z30 via CB10 
    I agree that a beast BlackBerry phone is precisely what the doctor would order! Its sales would help with the money levels and its positive impact on the brand image would help with turning things around on that front.

    I think that Windows Phone made a mistake by not producing a recent flagship device, and by producing a very, very niche Passport smartphone, BlackBerry has made much the same error. I think a company's flagship device influences where that company ranks in the buyers' mental hierarchies, even when that buyer isn't in the market for a flagship device. BlackBerry (and Microsoft) both need to show up as companies that can produce a drool-worthy device. In fact, this advice goes double for BlackBerry, because Microsoft probably has more advantages at the low end of the market, while BlackBerry has a naturally high-end appeal.
    02-10-15 02:39 PM
  3. berry4life99's Avatar
    I don't see the Passport as an error, but I see your logic. The unfortunate truth is people say they want something different when they really don't. In general people want the same thing over and over until they get tired of it. While the internals of the iPhone and Galaxy Note devices have been upgraded progressively over time, the look and feel has essentially not changed. Little tweaks to the device over time give the illusion of innovation. A full overhaul tends to be jarring for most people and turns them off.

    Think of the progression of sizes in the iPhone: the first five incarnations (first gen to 4S) were essentially the same size. Only when consumers began to complain did the 3.5" screen go away in lieu of first a 4" and then a 4.7" and 5.5" screen size. Android devices are available at essentially every half inch increment so it isn't out of the ordinary to see larger and larger Android devices.

    BlackBerry screen sizes have been all over the place. Being unpredictable made it difficult to catch the audience's attention for lack of stability in the eyes of consumers. "It doesn't look like my phone, I can't do the same things as I can with my phone, so I don't see a point in changing" is one of many arguments against BlackBerry.

    A different looking device does get attention but the kind of attention makes a difference. I think a Z30-type device running Android apps people are known to enjoy in an advertisement would be just the kind of comparison people need to give BlackBerry another look.

    Posted via CB10
    02-10-15 03:27 PM
  4. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    A "beast" phone without a supporting ecosystem will do just as poorly.

    If we learn anything from Apple, it should be the power of a cohesive ecosystem.

    ETA: IMHO, the PassPort is unique enough that I believe a good ecosystem would have really helped it gain traction.
    grover5 and berry4life99 like this.
    02-10-15 04:44 PM
  5. berry4life99's Avatar
    I wonder exactly what defines an ecosystem at this point. You look at Windows with computers, tablets and phones with downloadable apps. You see Apple with computers, tablets and phones with downloadable apps. You see Android with tablets and phones with downloadable apps. And finally there's BlackBerry with a tablet, phones and downloadable apps.

    I'm aware that what's available in each app store makes a difference, but it seems a little more ethereal when you lay it out in this manner.

    My big confusion is what does a developer have to lose by supporting BlackBerry and Windows Phone? How does a developer lose anything by supporting more platforms? Especially ones they don't really need to do much with any more? The only issues I have seen with Android apps on my Q10 have been sizing issues and Google Play services. I may not be a developer, but I imagine resizing UI elements can't be overwhelmingly difficult in 100% of cases. I had the Play services issue explained to me and it's a pro/con situation in my mind.

    I apparently don't understand the situation well enough if I'm asking questions, but it seems pretty simple to me that with proper specs an Android application should run fine on a BlackBerry 10 device and would expand the appreciation of consumers who felt left behind by developers.

    Posted via CB10
    02-10-15 06:02 PM
  6. KR2013's Avatar
    ETA: IMHO, the PassPort is unique enough that I believe a good ecosystem would have really helped it gain traction.
    Not sure it would happen, because of three things: 1) odd size that makes handling of the device a little difficult, 2) a square format the makes viewing of photos and videos less than ideal by not filling the screen, 2) a physical keyboard that is no longer popular with the masses, especially one that is non-standard. Believe it or not, many people still care about these things, even amongst the BB fans!
    02-10-15 06:32 PM
  7. ADGrant's Avatar
    My big confusion is what does a developer have to lose by supporting BlackBerry and Windows Phone? How does a developer lose anything by supporting more platforms? Especially ones they don't really need to do much with any more? The only issues I have seen with Android apps on my Q10 have been sizing issues and Google Play services. I may not be a developer, but I imagine resizing UI elements can't be overwhelmingly difficult in 100% of cases. I had the Play services issue explained to me and it's a pro/con situation in my mind.

    I apparently don't understand the situation well enough if I'm asking questions, but it seems pretty simple to me that with proper specs an Android application should run fine on a BlackBerry 10 device and would expand the appreciation of consumers who felt left behind by developers.

    Posted via CB10
    What developers have to lose is time and time is money. It's already challenging for Android developers to support all the different Android devices, most aren't interested in supporting devices that aren't even running an official Google build.

    Windows Phone OTOH needs a new app (unless some sort of cross platform toolkit was used).
    asherN likes this.
    02-10-15 07:08 PM
  8. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    I wonder exactly what defines an ecosystem at this point. You look at Windows with computers, tablets and phones with downloadable apps. You see Apple with computers, tablets and phones with downloadable apps. You see Android with tablets and phones with downloadable apps. And finally there's BlackBerry with a tablet, phones and downloadable apps.

    I'm aware that what's available in each app store makes a difference, but it seems a little more ethereal when you lay it out in this manner.

    My big confusion is what does a developer have to lose by supporting BlackBerry and Windows Phone? How does a developer lose anything by supporting more platforms? Especially ones they don't really need to do much with any more? The only issues I have seen with Android apps on my Q10 have been sizing issues and Google Play services. I may not be a developer, but I imagine resizing UI elements can't be overwhelmingly difficult in 100% of cases. I had the Play services issue explained to me and it's a pro/con situation in my mind.

    I apparently don't understand the situation well enough if I'm asking questions, but it seems pretty simple to me that with proper specs an Android application should run fine on a BlackBerry 10 device and would expand the appreciation of consumers who felt left behind by developers.
    I think your questions are fair; AdGrant pretty much nails it concisely.

    I used to wonder why developers didn't support all platforms. When I finally starting learning how to code as a hobby and write about technology for a living, it became apparent.

    Developing ain't easy.

    A developer broke it down for me a while back. The initial time it takes to develop an app is relatively small when one starts to consider continued support costs, server costs, travel time (conferences), customer service and more. I personally know SEVERAL developers who use Android devices in their personal lives, but develop only for iOS. For them, iOS pays the bills, and they get better ROI developing for it. Only when an additional platform provides clear earning potential does it become an option.

    I was interviewing a developers of an award-winning game that launched late last year. They hadn't slept in two days, and were struggling to keep up with a schedule that included fixing a glitch that had just been reported during a soft launch overseas.

    Freakin' 2 days without sleep to deal with support issues during a soft launch on ONE platform? Are you kidding me? One of the guys was newly married.

    The bottom line is that for most developers who code mobile apps for a living and don't have an overly emotional attachment to any single platform, one, maybe two platforms bring the RO! that makes the time and money expended worthwhile.

    It boils down to that: ROI.

    The Netflix fiasco was one situation that highlighted the lack of awareness some people had (have?) about app development. Years ago, Kevin and Bla1ze brought to light the phenomenon of app bounties that was taking root. Simply put, developers of major apps were beginning to understand how valuable their products were, and were beginning to tax platforms will smaller userbases for the privilege of coming on them. Netflix made a play for iOS, leaving Android in the cold, until Android had the numbers. Simple business. In talking to Netflix, it was clear that its mobile game plan is/was to increase its subscriber base. Developing for smaller platforms simply does not increase its user base.

    What did we do? A hilariously ill-advised strike, which garnered press and only proved to Netflix how little we affect its bottom line.

    For some reason, it seems we expect developers to be immune from the very same pressures every other working adult faces. We expect them to put in more work without matching ROI. The harsh truth is that is developing for BB10 was that lucrative, we'd all be falling over ourselves to do it.
    02-10-15 09:26 PM
  9. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Not sure it would happen, because of three things: 1) odd size that makes handling of the device a little difficult, 2) a square format the makes viewing of photos and videos less than ideal by not filling the screen, 2) a physical keyboard that is no longer popular with the masses, especially one that is non-standard. Believe it or not, many people still care about these things, even amongst the BB fans!
    Very fair points. i can't really argue.

    I do think if BB10 had the ecosystem (which help the devices to do a whole lot more), chances are that they might have made a bigger, better impression with more people.
    02-10-15 09:28 PM
  10. berry4life99's Avatar
    Tre, you're the first person who gave me a concret and understandable reason for this. I want you to know I appreciate the time you took to share your experience. It at least clarifies things more for me.

    Posted via CB10
    Tre Lawrence likes this.
    02-10-15 10:49 PM
  11. birdman_38's Avatar
    Actually, I think it is the road to a return to profitability. It will finally demonstrate that BlackBerry still has the ability to compete and that they are a growing concern, instead a of a company that slowly dying.
    Same can be said for HTC. Yet they don't have people clamoring for their products. That won't happen until they spend upwards of a billion dollars in advertising.

    It's a two horse race in North America between Apple and Samsung. All the others are just fighting for scraps.
    02-12-15 04:24 PM
  12. RyanGermann's Avatar
    Same can be said for HTC. Yet they don't have people clamoring for their products. That won't happen until they spend upwards of a billion dollars in advertising.

    It's a two horse race in North America between Apple and Samsung. All the others are just fighting for scraps.
    ...but despite the quality of the flagship HTC devices, a Samsung device is a safer bet if the customer is concerned with the vendor staying in business: HTC is no stranger to press reports of their imminent demise, and those idiotic and expensive RDJ commercials didn't help. HTC's Android layer 'Sense' gets good reviews and their hardware is gorgeous to almost universal acclaim, so yeah, marketing (which includes carrier sales agent incentives) plays a huge part, too.

    BlackBerry has a number of obstacles to overcome, but it can succeed as a company even without selling 70 million devices per quarter. My iPhone 6+ isn't a bad device even though I hardly touch the thing... just as chocolate and vanilla ice cream are the most popular flavours, that doesn't mean that there isn't profits to be made producing Tiger Tail or Green Tea flavours... BlackBerry needs to maintain a unique value proposition to survive: the mistake was assuming that just because a BB10 device could ape the form factor and technology of populist hardware that would be enough to ensure popularity. Nope.

    There is potential for BlackBerry to grow, and if BlackBerry wanted to develop their own Netflix client, Netflix Ltd would block it or cite patents that BlackBerry has violated... so the issue of 'no native BB10 Netflix client' is less about their ROI, there's something wierd and creepy there when every 20,000 unit BluRay player has a netflix client but BB10 doesn't... I speculate that Jim or Mike L disrespected or disparaged Netflix's streaming strategy, perhaps even spurned overtures from netflix to preload the java-based Netflix client that runs on those aforementioned BluRay players on BBOS devices, and revenge is a dish best served cold, like ice cream... just tying up all those metaphorical loose ends there... and I'll be darned if I can guess what goes on in the head of an executive team that thought that a 100% price hike and 'Quikster' were good business ideas.

    Posted via CB10
    02-13-15 09:17 PM
  13. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    ...but despite the quality of the flagship HTC devices, a Samsung device is a safer bet if the customer is concerned with the vendor staying in business: HTC is no stranger to press reports of their imminent demise, and those idiotic and expensive RDJ commercials didn't help. HTC's Android layer 'Sense' gets good reviews and their hardware is gorgeous to almost universal acclaim, so yeah, marketing (which includes carrier sales agent incentives) plays a huge part, too.

    BlackBerry has a number of obstacles to overcome, but it can succeed as a company even without selling 70 million devices per quarter. My iPhone 6+ isn't a bad device even though I hardly touch the thing... just as chocolate and vanilla ice cream are the most popular flavours, that doesn't mean that there isn't profits to be made producing Tiger Tail or Green Tea flavours... BlackBerry needs to maintain a unique value proposition to survive: the mistake was assuming that just because a BB10 device could ape the form factor and technology of populist hardware that would be enough to ensure popularity. Nope.

    There is potential for BlackBerry to grow, and if BlackBerry wanted to develop their own Netflix client, Netflix Ltd would block it or cite patents that BlackBerry has violated... so the issue of 'no native BB10 Netflix client' is less about their ROI, there's something wierd and creepy there when every 20,000 unit BluRay player has a netflix client but BB10 doesn't... I speculate that Jim or Mike L disrespected or disparaged Netflix's streaming strategy, perhaps even spurned overtures from netflix to preload the java-based Netflix client that runs on those aforementioned BluRay players on BBOS devices, and revenge is a dish best served cold, like ice cream... just tying up all those metaphorical loose ends there... and I'll be darned if I can guess what goes on in the head of an executive team that thought that a 100% price hike and 'Quikster' were good business ideas.

    Posted via CB10
    Nope. Simple business.

    Who's making those Blu-Ray players (or handheld gaming system or smart tv)? Ah... the strategy makes more sense.

    Netflix can't afford to have hurt feelings. They want new customers. Creating Netflix ports for, say, all Sony consumer products does that. Doing it for BB10 is simply not worth the investment at this point.
    JeepBB likes this.
    02-13-15 09:36 PM
  14. RyanGermann's Avatar
    Nope. Simple business.

    Who's making those Blu-Ray players (or handheld gaming system or smart tv)? Ah... the strategy makes more sense.

    Netflix can't afford to have hurt feelings. They want new customers. Creating Netflix ports for, say, all Sony consumer products does that. Doing it for BB10 is simply not worth the investment at this point.
    Can you explain why Netflix would block BlackBerry from developing the BB10 native Netflix client? Please don't suggest that BlackBerry would not want to make the investment nor that it would be costly for Netflix to develop because both are implausible.

    The reasons I suggest ARE simple: "anti-blackberry bias" which may be inspired by an exclusivity deal with other vendors, but with Netflix available on hardware manufactured by virtually every vendor, 'simple business' i.e. insufficient ROI of allowing netflix on BB10 is pure speculation and doesn't make sense.
    02-14-15 12:04 PM
  15. ubizmo's Avatar
    "Anti-BlackBerry bias" is even more speculative and makes less sense. Why should Netflix have such a bias? What makes simple sense is, they don't want to take responsibility for maintaining and supporting a service on a platform with so few users. It's the same explanation for why other content providers are absent from BB10. Why is there no Audible app, when we know the Android one has always worked fine, even before the Amazon app store "deal"? Amazon didn't have to do anything to the Audible app except put it in BlackBerry World, but they never did. Why not? Because they hate BlackBerry?

    As soon as a developer makes an app available on a platform, that developer takes responsibility for updating and supporting it, and that costs money. Why spend the money if the number of users is tiny?
    JeepBB and grover5 like this.
    02-14-15 12:34 PM
  16. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Can you explain why Netflix would block BlackBerry from developing the BB10 native Netflix client? Please don't suggest that BlackBerry would not want to make the investment nor that it would be costly for Netflix to develop because both are implausible.

    The reasons I suggest ARE simple: "anti-blackberry bias" which may be inspired by an exclusivity deal with other vendors, but with Netflix available on hardware manufactured by virtually every vendor, 'simple business' i.e. insufficient ROI of allowing netflix on BB10 is pure speculation and doesn't make sense.
    How would "Netflix" block BBRY from developing its own app? Netflix does its own development, which is what I'd expect.

    Again, remember, the number one reason for a Netflix client is to get NEW subscribers. When you look at it through that lens, it makes sense.
    02-14-15 01:27 PM
  17. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Some perspective:

    http://forums.crackberry.com/showthread.php?p=11349578

    Something to consider here: Netflix doesn't support iOS or Android or anyone else because it "likes" them; it does so because doing so provides ROI.

    It doesn't make a port for Firefox for the SAME reason BBRY hasn't made a BBM port for Firefox: it doesn't make sense financially.
    02-14-15 01:35 PM
  18. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    Can you explain why Netflix would block BlackBerry from developing the BB10 native Netflix client? Please don't suggest that BlackBerry would not want to make the investment nor that it would be costly for Netflix to develop because both are implausible.
    It's because Netflix closed its API to everyone, likely due to pressure from the content-owners, who are afraid that too many hands in the pie would allow their content to escape. It cannot be overstated how paranoid the studios are about their content being stolen from licensed means, especially if it can be done easily.

    Yes, at one time, Netflix would give their APIs to major hardware manufacturers so that Netflix apps could be created for their devices: TVs, Blu-Ray players, network streamers, game consoles, etc. Netflix didn't have the resources to do all that development itself at the beginning, but things change, and now, that access has been withdrawn to protect the content, and it's up to Netflix to decide where to spend their limited development resources.

    Their first priority is for devices that are normally connected to a TV, as this is how most users use the service. Mobile devices are correctly seen as a secondary priority. By developing for Mac, PC, iOS, and Android, they are covering 98+% of their target audience. Remember that Netflix mostly serves the US, Canada, and some of Europe, with other regions slowly coming online as Netflix is able to make deals for content licensing, but the US is the primary market.

    That's why they don't care about mobile platforms with <2% of the US market - mobile devices are already a secondary priority for them, and they understand that most of those users will already have another way of viewing Netflix, so not having, say, a BB10 Netflix app is only likely to lose them a handful of subscriptions compared to if such an app existed.

    This is their business, and you can bet that they have paid subscriptions to all of the ratings and marketshare services, and have extensive logs of use of their own services, and know better than any of us what the demand is like for smaller platforms. If there was money to be made supporting a new platform, they almost certainly would, but since they haven't, it's a very good bet that there's just no money in it for them. Remember too that any app not only has initial development costs but sustained ongoing development and support costs, so an app would have to create long-term profits to make sense.
    JeepBB likes this.
    02-14-15 01:36 PM
  19. berry4life99's Avatar
    Another person who's at least being logical. I appreciate the breakdown of why it wouldn't make sense instead of just saying it wouldn't make sense. I had a deep argument about the capabilities of BlackBerry 10 with an Android diehard whose only argument was essentially "BlackBerry's stupid, and anyone who supports them is stupid too." I,for one, like seeing logical arguments rather than emotional ones. In this forum alone I have learned about the general background of app development and gained a better understanding of business undertakings for developers. This is what we need more than people just bashing one platform or another.

    With that being said, I have to acknowledge the emotional aspect as well. Business aside, I'm frustrated by the lack of acknowledgement by app developers and businesses in the US. It's a Catch 22 constantly: BlackBerry needs app support to attract consumers, consumers don't get BlackBerry devices because "there's no apps", companies don't support BlackBerry because "no one uses BlackBerry"...ad infinitum. I boycott Netflix for not even giving BlackBerry 10 a look, but by that logic I should abandon my banks, the stores I like to go to, public events and even food products because they don't support my platform. Why don't I? None of them came out and publicly said "you can't use this because you like BlackBerry instead of being smart like iOS and Android users and jumping on the bandwagon". It has taken me years to finally decide to dual wield devices so I can at least understand why the general population in America seems to think Android is so superior when the only apparent difference is app support. The differences beneath the surface can sway a consumer in one direction or another, but the average person usually asks "can I get this or that app?" and if they are told no or there's a relatively elaborate (more than one step) way to do it, they move on.

    I am finally attempting to abandon my bias and be more agnostic, but I don't fully understand how the masses can't get behind BlackBerry. My quest, much like Don Quixote, is to find out the answer for myself.

    Posted via CB10
    02-14-15 02:16 PM
  20. birdman_38's Avatar
    I am finally attempting to abandon my bias and be more agnostic, but I don't fully understand how the masses can't get behind BlackBerry. My quest, much like Don Quixote, is to find out the answer for myself.
    Lack of apps coupled with market dominance by Apple. There's your answer.
    02-14-15 02:22 PM
  21. ADGrant's Avatar

    It has taken me years to finally decide to dual wield devices so I can at least understand why the general population in America seems to think Android is so superior when the only apparent difference is app support. The differences beneath the surface can sway a consumer in one direction or another, but the average person usually asks "can I get this or that app?" and if they are told no or there's a relatively elaborate (more than one step) way to do it, they move on.
    I am finally attempting to abandon my bias and be more agnostic, but I don't fully understand how the masses can't get behind BlackBerry. My quest, much like Don Quixote, is to find out the answer for myself.

    Posted via CB10
    Why would the masses get behind BB? What would it give them that they are not already getting from the smartphone they are currently using?
    Why shouldn't they prioritize app selection over the Hub?
    02-14-15 02:44 PM
  22. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Another person who's at least being logical. I appreciate the breakdown of why it wouldn't make sense instead of just saying it wouldn't make sense. I had a deep argument about the capabilities of BlackBerry 10 with an Android diehard whose only argument was essentially "BlackBerry's stupid, and anyone who supports them is stupid too." I,for one, like seeing logical arguments rather than emotional ones. In this forum alone I have learned about the general background of app development and gained a better understanding of business undertakings for developers. This is what we need more than people just bashing one platform or another.

    With that being said, I have to acknowledge the emotional aspect as well. Business aside, I'm frustrated by the lack of acknowledgement by app developers and businesses in the US. It's a Catch 22 constantly: BlackBerry needs app support to attract consumers, consumers don't get BlackBerry devices because "there's no apps", companies don't support BlackBerry because "no one uses BlackBerry"...ad infinitum. I boycott Netflix for not even giving BlackBerry 10 a look, but by that logic I should abandon my banks, the stores I like to go to, public events and even food products because they don't support my platform. Why don't I? None of them came out and publicly said "you can't use this because you like BlackBerry instead of being smart like iOS and Android users and jumping on the bandwagon". It has taken me years to finally decide to dual wield devices so I can at least understand why the general population in America seems to think Android is so superior when the only apparent difference is app support. The differences beneath the surface can sway a consumer in one direction or another, but the average person usually asks "can I get this or that app?" and if they are told no or there's a relatively elaborate (more than one step) way to do it, they move on.

    I am finally attempting to abandon my bias and be more agnostic, but I don't fully understand how the masses can't get behind BlackBerry. My quest, much like Don Quixote, is to find out the answer for myself.

    Posted via CB10
    As Birdman said... ecosystem.

    I honestly believe ecosystem has been the biggest barrier. More painful is that old-timers like myself remember when BBRY had the ecosystem advantage. BBRY miscalculated, while Apple/iOS stumbled (IMHO) on the a la carte model of satisfying consumers AND developers at relatively bargain prices. Google was able to hop on the bandwagon early on, while WP8 tarried a bit too long.

    But its that ecosystem, IMHO.

    I allowed a friend to use one of my BBs. He uses iOS, but isn't unwilling to try new things; I don't consider myself a platform evangelist by any stretch, but he broke his phone, and needed a GSM device, and I had an extra, so it worked out. He loved BB10, but in the end, it just didn't allow him to do the things he was used to as easily. The underlined was a major factor. From a consumer perspective, i makes a lot of sense. No matter what we think, we as people generally don't adopt stuff that is more difficult -- or less effective -- when we are already entrenched in any one method.

    The runtime? Well, ask the average person to patch an app, and you'll see the tough road that BBRY faces.

    So, in my estimation, that delay right around 07/08 continues to cost BBRY till this day. I think BBRY has made some decent decisions recently, and has weathered the storm in a relatively equitable manner. It will need to find a way to shore up its ecosystem (apps, accessories, etc) to have a fighting chance, whether or not it is focusing on consumers or not.
    ubizmo and anon1727506 like this.
    02-14-15 02:53 PM
  23. Tre Lawrence's Avatar
    Why would the masses get behind BB? What would it give them that they are not already getting from the smartphone they are currently using?
    Why shouldn't they prioritize app selection over the Hub?
    Again, straight to the point, and concise.

    The hub is probably one of my favorite concepts in a long time, but I completely understand how it is not the anchor feature some people think it is.
    ADGrant likes this.
    02-14-15 02:55 PM
  24. ubizmo's Avatar

    I am finally attempting to abandon my bias and be more agnostic, but I don't fully understand how the masses can't get behind BlackBerry. My quest, much like Don Quixote, is to find out the answer for myself.
    It only takes one missing app to give someone a sufficient reason to leave BB10, or to not try it in the first place.

    I've been called a BlackBerry fanboy more than once around here, but if the Kindle app were to cease working on BB10, I'd be gone the next day. I have no interest in a platform that doesn't fully support Kindle. For someone else it might be Netflix or SnapChat. The Hub just can't overcome that.

    The "masses" are just ordinary people whose expectations have been formed by current functionalities and the apps that provide them.
    pantlesspenguin likes this.
    02-14-15 04:49 PM
  25. RyanGermann's Avatar
    If there was money to be made supporting a new platform, they almost certainly would, but since they haven't, it's a very good bet that there's just no money in it for them. Remember too that any app not only has initial development costs but sustained ongoing development and support costs, so an app would have to create long-term profits to make sense.
    I assert the reasons why Netflix is not allowing THE MOST SECURE mobile OS to have a native Netflix app nor port over the Android version IS NOT because the content owners are worried about BlackBerry security. Every $50 BluRay player STILL has netflix on it.

    my point: the reasons are fishy, not necessarily explained by more than 'Netflix executive is capricious when it comes to mobile OS support', and fiscal considerations don't bear scrutiny. There are millions of active BB10 devices. That's a significant number: in a world when one developer can build a full-featured Instagram or SnapChat app, the cost of development also doesn't hold up as a reason NETFLIX et. al have rejected the idea of native BB10 support.
    Posted via CB10
    Last edited by RyanGermann; 02-14-15 at 05:10 PM.
    02-14-15 05:00 PM
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