1. mdarscott's Avatar
    Tablets: Corporate market still up for grabs - FT.com

    Tablets are discussed in this order:
    Apple
    Android
    Windows 8
    RIM
    02-26-12 07:26 AM
  2. kbz1960's Avatar
    Well RIM better. Get their arses in gear and get the bugs out.
    VanCity778 likes this.
    02-26-12 07:31 AM
  3. simu31's Avatar
    Any chance of copying/posting (at least a part of) the article as it's behind a paywall?

    Thanks

    Si.
    02-26-12 07:35 AM
  4. llagerva's Avatar
    I believe that you have the option of signing up for free access to a few articles a week. The article also gives you the option of leaving a comment on their conclusions. I believe that I am the only one to comment so far - however with a different user name.
    02-26-12 08:12 AM
  5. apasehculun's Avatar
    Well, from what I've heard, BB & PB have a very high level of security & data encryption. I don't about other devices, but they are using regular provider line. You may be able to add more security by using specific apps or even hardware. But that mean cost you more. JM2C.
    02-26-12 09:47 AM
  6. sleepngbear's Avatar
    This could end up being a market where there is no clear 'winner'. RIM provides better security and BES already embedded in many large organizations; Apple has insanely higher consumer saturation; and Apple and Android are both (supposedly) more developer-friendly (whether that continues to be the case remains to be seen); Windows is of course deeply entrenched in most business of all types and sizes. I'm not about to make any predictions on this one, but I'd have to put Android at the bottom of the list.

    Here's a different article that references the one in the OP: Think Beyond iPad for Tablet Surveys | Research Access

    I hate to say it, but I think in the long run it's going to be Microsoft's for the losing. They will have the biggest foot in the door when it comes to integration with existing platforms. It's going to depend on when Windows 8 drops, if it's a truly viable tablet alternative, and how much adoption saturation the others have when it does drop. Could be a game-changer, could be a non-starter.
    02-26-12 10:07 AM
  7. kbz1960's Avatar
    I have to agree with sleepngbear.
    02-26-12 10:12 AM
  8. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    ^^^I also agree. I don't want any tablets other than a Windows 8 tablet (and a Linux Spark tablet to play with).

    All the iPads, Androids, Playbook = meh.
    02-26-12 10:34 AM
  9. sosumi11's Avatar
    All of the concerns mentioned in this article are exactly the same as they were for personal computers. The platform with the biggest support wins. Period. Security issues are handled by each company individually using third party solutions.

    Tablets: Corporate market still up for grabs
    By Chris Nuttall

    The iPad may have carried all before it in the consumer tablet market, but the corporate market seems still to be up for grabs, with companies more cautious in their commitments.

    Apple has first-mover advantage. On its quarterly earnings call in January, the Silicon Valley company said nearly all the US top companies were using the iPad to some degree to improve work flows, business processes and customer engagements.

    Generally, our clients are telling us: We are deploying the iPad or allowing the iPad into the workplace as a bring-your-own-device [BYOD]; we are looking at Android, but are not ready yet to commit to it; and we are waiting for Microsoft, says Carolina Milanesi, consumer technologies and markets analyst at Gartner, the research company.

    Googles Android operating system leads Apples iOS and the iPhone in smartphones, but has not had the same success in tablets, while Microsoft surrendered an early lead with Windows-based tablets, as businesses take a wait-and-see approach. The more touch- and app-friendly Windows 8 is due this year.

    Ms Milanesi says Android tablets problems are related to the Android market, where a lack of control over apps is raising security concerns.

    You cant count on users not downloading apps, because thats what they want the tablet for. So, for enterprises, it means they have to deploy something on top of Android from a security and device management perspective and that entails higher costs.
    For Android tablet manufacturers, of which Lenovo and Samsung are favoured by companies, says Gartner, concerns about security represent an opportunity.

    When we designed our Thinkpad tablets, we thought about the challenges for the IT department in securing devices that are instant-on, portable and easily forgotten people just leave them lying around, says Stephen Miller, Lenovo product ambassador.
    Lenovos security features include geostamping devices, so that they are locked and become unusable if taken out of the office or a defined area. They can also be wiped of all data remotely.

    Another feature is custom imaging allowing a standard set-up for company-issued tablets, with defined and approved apps on specified screens. Additional apps can be delivered over the air and Lenovo offers control over custom app stores.

    Research In Motion is offering a more flexible approach by introducing BlackBerry Balance with its PlayBook tablet a safe sandboxing of part of the tablet for personal use.
    This allows users to have their own space on the device, so they can load games, browse, play music do what they want, rather than the old days of locking it down, says David Heit, director of product strategy for RIM.

    BlackBerry Balance is part of a 2.0 version of the Playbooks software being introduced. The tablet has been a disappointment for RIM in December 2011, it announced a $485m charge for unsold PlayBooks.

    The device originally relied on bridging software for email and calendar to be accessed on the tablet through a companion BlackBerry smartphone a criticised modus operandi no longer needed with 2.0.

    The idea of the bridge was that this leveraged the security already on the BlackBerry smartphone, the big benefit being it allowed a lot of organisations a bit more time to figure out their strategy for tablets, explains Mr Heit.
    Non-iPad tablet makers have also sought an advantage in a feature Apple turned its back on many years ago with the failure of its Newton personal digital assistant pen-based input, with a number of manufacturers integrating a stylus and pen-specific software in their devices.

    The digital paper company Anoto is working on the concept of a folder with a tablet and special writing pad next to it. Using the digital pen on the pad streams the writing in real time to the screen of the tablet.

    More than 80 per cent of all daily capture in the enterprise is with paper still, says Stein Revelsby, Anoto chief executive.

    Unless it wants to lose market share to Samsung [whose new Galaxy Note tablet features a pen], I think Apple needs to do something with pens as well.

    While a recent NPD In-Stat survey found 68 per cent of tablets provided by companies to staff were iPads, Frank Dickson, its vice-president of mobile research, says there is still not the same brand loyalty as in the consumer world. People are not wedded to a platform or device; they are trying to figure out what they can do with a tablet, he says.
    Email is by far the number one thing people want to use an iPad or tablet for, but there are many niche apps that are popular as well, such as IT monitoring, and its really about how whichever tablet can solve such unique problems.
    02-26-12 10:57 AM
  10. VanCity778's Avatar
    Well yea its up for grabs because its still a new market. It will be dominated by Apple and Windows. Its only a matter of time. RIM is in for a big fight if they think they can battle those two giant's. I love RIM so don't get me wrong here but they should focus on Android right now. Windows 8 has the potential go head to head with the ipad in the corporate community.

    I say this because of the long history that Windows has in the office world and the long history Apple has in the school system. People grew up with these brands. I want RIM to be successful but right now it time to lay low and make noise when they have a ground breaking product. But hey, that's just my opinion.
    02-26-12 11:23 AM
  11. needforbbx's Avatar
    "RIM is in for a big fight if they think they can battle those two giant's"

    Hold on - RIM did battle MS before and came out on top. So not out of the realm of possibilities....
    recompile likes this.
    02-26-12 01:20 PM
  12. Economist101's Avatar
    Hold on - RIM did battle MS before and came out on top. So not out of the realm of possibilities....
    True, but that was in phones, and tablets aren't phones. RIM need not be intimidated by MS, but since you can't draw a straight line from phones to tablets this isn't a simple "if, then" argument. Look no further than Android, which roars in phones and whimpers in tablets (sales wise).
    VanCity778 likes this.
    02-26-12 01:26 PM
  13. sinsin07's Avatar
    All of the concerns mentioned in this article are exactly the same as they were for personal computers. The platform with the biggest support wins. Period. Security issues are handled by each company individually using third party solutions.
    There was no BYOD for personal computers.
    02-26-12 01:42 PM
  14. sosumi11's Avatar
    There was no BYOD for personal computers.
    True. It was all about compatibility. People bought PC's for home because that's what they used for work. Today, people are buying Macs for home (compatibility issues almost disappeared) and now there is a strong demand for BYOC today.

    How to Safely Implement Bring Your Own Computer Programs
    Last edited by sosumi11; 02-26-12 at 06:14 PM.
    02-26-12 05:42 PM
  15. Dapper37's Avatar
    I like Rims chances in the corporate world. They are well on their way to a unique solution for IT departments. PlayBook already is a no brainer when it comes to compatibility with the Smart Phone.
    02-26-12 10:26 PM
  16. world traveler and former ceo's Avatar
    True, but that was in phones, and tablets aren't phones. RIM need not be intimidated by MS, but since you can't draw a straight line from phones to tablets this isn't a simple "if, then" argument. Look no further than Android, which roars in phones and whimpers in tablets (sales wise).
    RIM has been at the tablet space for a while now and is seriously committed to this area ... they can compete and they can be a strong player without question .. they need to build on their strengths and continue to innovate ... the integration of their tablets with their superphones will bode well for them .. but its competitive for sure ... i don't think they will be intimidated ...

    The playbook is a solid and professional product that continues to develop and improve ... as a IT professional and executive of over 25 years .. its my tablet of choice .....
    recompile likes this.
    02-27-12 02:00 AM
  17. Rootbrian's Avatar
    Bugs, Glitches... What platform DOESN'T have them? They all do, it's just how the user/IT department handles them. I want to see more blackberrys in the IT section. I do see quite a bit on bay street when downtown. Like tons.
    02-27-12 06:38 AM
  18. Rootbrian's Avatar
    I fully agree!

    RIM has been at the tablet space for a while now and is seriously committed to this area ... they can compete and they can be a strong player without question .. they need to build on their strengths and continue to innovate ... the integration of their tablets with their superphones will bode well for them .. but its competitive for sure ... i don't think they will be intimidated ...

    The playbook is a solid and professional product that continues to develop and improve ... as a IT professional and executive of over 25 years .. its my tablet of choice .....
    02-27-12 06:39 AM
  19. Economist101's Avatar
    The playbook is a solid and professional product that continues to develop and improve ... as a IT professional and executive of over 25 years .. its my tablet of choice .....
    This has been the case since launch, but being the "IT tablet of choice" hasn't delivered the kind of advantage RIM hoped. It's a Hobson's choice; serve the enterprise and lose consumers, or serve consumers and lose the enterprise.
    02-27-12 07:46 AM
  20. swyost's Avatar
    This could end up being a market where there is no clear 'winner'. RIM provides better security and BES already embedded in many large organizations; Apple has insanely higher consumer saturation; and Apple and Android are both (supposedly) more developer-friendly (whether that continues to be the case remains to be seen); Windows is of course deeply entrenched in most business of all types and sizes. I'm not about to make any predictions on this one, but I'd have to put Android at the bottom of the list.

    Here's a different article that references the one in the OP: Think Beyond iPad for Tablet Surveys | Research Access

    I hate to say it, but I think in the long run it's going to be Microsoft's for the losing. They will have the biggest foot in the door when it comes to integration with existing platforms. It's going to depend on when Windows 8 drops, if it's a truly viable tablet alternative, and how much adoption saturation the others have when it does drop. Could be a game-changer, could be a non-starter.
    Microsoft has always been the 800 pound gorilla in the room. In the end, I think their strategy of the past year will prove to have been the wise one. They stayed mostly out of the game to work on an optimized OS that would unify all of its platforms and have already lined up hardware vendors for it. This meant they did not bet the farm and push a tablet OS to the market in a year when corporations were still doing recession inspired belt tightening. People are also going to be given nearly a year to play with it for free starting Wednesday, which gives them time to convince people to like certain things or make adjustments. In addition, they just extended the life of Windows 7 by a decade which will allow them to market the corporate sector from both directions for quite some time to come.

    BTW, Microsoft and RIM both have one advantage over the Android crowd and Apple. Apple and Google have allowed their feud to get personal, which is never good for business in the long run.
    02-27-12 03:50 PM
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