1. MMB916's Avatar
    The days when airplanes offer a hiatus from being connected to the office are numbered.

    After years of discussion and delay, U.S. airlines will start offering in-flight Internet connections, instant messaging and wireless email within 12 months, turning the cabin into a WiFi "hotspot." Carriers are expected to start making announcements around the end of the summer, with service beginning early next year.

    Like it or not, airborne cellphone chatter still has a flying chance in U.S. airplane cabins, as well, despite a recent indication that the Federal Communications Commission will keep a ban in place.


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    04-04-07 01:09 PM
  2. tmag2005's Avatar
    Not being funny but if its allowed on train nd other public transport then fine. As long as it doesnt affect vital operational running of the plane then fine. And yes i know you always get the business user shouting their odds around but actually BB users wont be so inconsiderate as they will be emailing etc.....

    Has anyone ever seen Dom Jolly?

    HERE

    04-04-07 01:39 PM
  3. MMB916's Avatar
    This is VERY funny, tmag! I had never seen this.

    And I agree - u can at least be quite with a BB.

    Most imporant thing of course is that there is NO interferance in the actual flying of the plane...as u say

    Not being funny but if its allowed on train nd other public transport then fine. As long as it doesnt affect vital operational running of the plane then fine. And yes i know you always get the business user shouting their odds around but actually BB users wont be so inconsiderate as they will be emailing etc.....

    Has anyone ever seen Dom Jolly?

    HERE

    04-04-07 01:45 PM
  4. anon(153966)'s Avatar
    My only problem with being able to be connected everywhere (I know I want to be) is that families and loved ones can suffer...

    Why, example, you're busy at work enough as it is now, then you take it home, then you take it on holiday with you, then you're sick, in the hospital, and do it there too (noticed I've not started a new sentence), then you're at your childs football game, and your working there too, you've even out to dinner, and you're working (answering work emails)...

    My point is, where does it end? Now, don't get me wrong, I want my BlackBerry and other gadgets to work no matter where I am, but, where does one draw the line? Rhetorical, of course, since no one can 'really' answer that; there are too many counter arguments to it...
    04-04-07 01:51 PM
  5. MMB916's Avatar
    I'm not answering - just agreeing that you just pinpointed the downside of our lovable gadgets - although..I will atest - when sick and in the hospital they can be a gift sent from heaven - provided you're too sick to go out but well enough to use the gadgets...

    My only problem with being able to be connected everywhere (I know I want to be) is that families and loved ones can suffer...

    Why, example, you're busy at work enough as it is now, then you take it home, then you take it on holiday with you, then you're sick, in the hospital, and do it there too (noticed I've not started a new sentence), then you're at your childs football game, and your working there too, you've even out to dinner, and you're working (answering work emails)...

    My point is, where does it end? Now, don't get me wrong, I want my BlackBerry and other gadgets to work no matter where I am, but, where does one draw the line? Rhetorical, of course, since no one can 'really' answer that; there are too many counter arguments to it...
    04-04-07 01:55 PM
  6. MMB916's Avatar
    No-call zone

    Published April 6, 2007 - Chicago Tribune...

    You know the pretakeoff drill. Fasten your seat belts. Locate the nearest exits. Turn off all portable electronic devices and cell phones. That's not going to change any time soon. And for that, you can thank the Federal Communications Commission.

    The FCC has decided to keep its ban on cell phone use in the skies because it just doesn't know enough about how those calls would affect cell phone traffic on the ground. The Federal Aviation Administration also bans the use of cell phones and electronic devices while planes are airborne because they might interfere with the plane's navigation and communications systems. Those government restrictions have kept the skies mercifully free of cell phone chatter.

    The FCC decision two and a half years ago to consider lifting the ban provoked a furious debate. More than 8,000 people sent comments to the FCC. Many begged the FCC: Please don't subject us to this.

    Some people pointed out that airplanes had substantial background noise, such as the roar of engines, so people on their phones would talk even louder than they normally do. Others hinted darkly at the potential for "air rage" and "violent conflict between passengers." Others insisted that they have an inherent right to carry on conversations wherever they please -- behind the wheel, on buses and trains, in restaurants, in movie theaters and on airplanes.

    The FCC said none of the emotional arguments on either side swayed commissioners. It will keep the ban because it doesn't have enough information on how cell phone calls from 5 miles up would affect cell towers on the ground. Those calls could tie up circuits in many cell towers at once, perhaps leading to worse service.

    Whatever the reason, this is a small victory in the cell phone wars. For at least a little while longer, the skies will remain a refuge from the can-you-hear-me-now? crowd.
    04-08-07 06:29 PM
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