12-05-17 11:31 AM
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  1. conite's Avatar
    BB10 isn't going anywhere until they can get an android device to get full NIAP certification. They bank on the security and ability of BB7 and BB10 to operate at the highest level of government agencies. These phones are typically restricted anyway, hence a bbry classic variant without a camera. Government employees, especially those relying on security don't need a phone with facebook, games or apps. They need a secure platform that allows phonecalls, texting, email and browsing - hint hint, the browser being updated. Also, no way the US, or many other governments are going to let a TCL device operate on their network. BB10 isn't going to be licensed to anyone. Will they make a new BB10 device? Maybe not... depends on their ability to harness Droid and secure it properly. Plus, why make a new BB10 device? They're lightyears better than BB7, which is still widely used in government agencies. Also, the current BB10 line up is fairly inexpensive and works really well running it's core features.

    Posted via CB10
    There are a number of Android devices, along with iPhone, that have NIAP certification.

    I would imagine BlackBerry will make their application with the upcoming hardened Nougat, that BlackBerry claims is as secure as BB10.

    Do not minimise the importance of apps in the government and corporate sectors. As a matter of fact, BB10 can't even GET on some managed networks because of the lack of AirWatch, Citrix, SAP, IBM, and other EMM apps. Then you can start to list all of the business collaboration tools that are not compatible with BB10, and run out of room on the page.
    01-06-17 11:53 PM
  2. BurningPlatform's Avatar
    I could see the user base was too small to make it worth while
    [...]
    And based on such a small potential market, an app I charge $5 for over on the Apple Store, I'd have to charge at least 10x, maybe 20x that on BBW, just to get the same return on investment of my time and effort.
    Stephanie, I'm so glad that you were lucky enough to succeed with your apps on Android. The problem is that (according to several Google Play and Apple store stats I've read) some 60-80% of apps available there never got a single download. So unless those stats were untrue, lots (if not most judging by the percentage) of developers didn't have as much luck as you. At some point I had to make a decision whether to try luck on such an insanely competitive market as Android or iOS or whether to focus on something much less competitive as BB10, and I chose the latter. And I haven't died of hunger yet. And no, my apps don't cost like 10x or 20x the typical Android app price, all of them fit within the $0.99-2.99 range, i.e. quite normal I think.

    Of course, I do know that from now on it'll be getting worse and worse, but that's another story.
    01-07-17 02:34 AM
  3. Tim-ANC's Avatar
    Yet... BlackBerry TimeMachine...

    "How far are you headed?"
    "Oh, about ten years..."

    Sadly, the Flux Capacitor app doesn't work on BB10
    01-07-17 02:41 AM
  4. Troy Tiscareno's Avatar
    BB10 isn't going anywhere until they can get an android device to get full NIAP certification.
    Every iPhone and most Android flagships from the last 3-4 years are all NIAP certified. Enterprise isn't waiting for BB. Heck, even BB isn't waiting for BB - BES/Good manages all of those non-BB, NIAP-certified phones.
    01-07-17 04:05 AM
  5. Emaderton3's Avatar
    There are a number of Android devices, along with iPhone, that have NIAP certification.

    I would imagine BlackBerry will make their application with the upcoming hardened Nougat, that BlackBerry claims is as secure as BB10.

    Do not minimise the importance of apps in the government and corporate sectors. As a matter of fact, BB10 can't even GET on some managed networks because of the lack of AirWatch, Citrix, SAP, IBM, and other EMM apps. Then you can start to list all of the business collaboration tools that are not compatible with BB10, and run out of room on the page.
    This! Just because BlackBerry phones may have some special certifications does not make them the best tool for the government sector. People need apps, and it's just not games. And plenty of organizations in government have dumped BlackBerry phones, so obviously other types of phones have what they need.

    And in terms of consumer apps, just using your browser instead of having an app is not a long term solution. It is inconvenient and doesn't always have the same functionality. I am even running into sites where I cannot login using the browser anymore.

    Posted via CB10
    Last edited by Emaderton3; 01-07-17 at 08:57 AM.
    01-07-17 08:12 AM
  6. stlabrat's Avatar
    (1) during sony attach, BBOS7 was the only one that worked and saved day - based on my understanding. look like it still has role to play.
    (2) I didn't know that 60-80% of app with download record zero. that is sad of waste talent and resources. Better structure than BBW or Play store of free market type is required to utilize the work done by programmers (don't know how...but that situation can't lasting very long)
    (3) App is on its way out (I believe), due to in-efficient use application (usually it is single application, not aggregated... something like "office suite"- with option of add on module increamental fee might be better?). If done properly, that will free up a lots of memories and clean up the UI screen.... most likely is going to benefit big player, that has many string to pull... like amazon and facebook,
    (4) BB10 if done properly, and timing correct, it might have chance due to secure and closed format (once it is open, you got ran over by massive "me too" - remind me the BBM cross platform days - how many fake on apple website?). you need close system for control.
    (5) The BB company is not the same as it used to be - hardware - gone. software of handset OS, server (BIS) - more or less gone. App - gone (not counting on droid... ). The current company link is QNX from the old days and BES. All others are NEW addition to the security, self driving car, radar... (network extension). Back to BB10 would be difficult, even it could be beneficial. I admit the chip is stack againest it.
    01-07-17 08:44 AM
  7. BlackBerryPassport's Avatar
    Why would anyone buy a phone only because it was shown to them by some guy on the street for the first (and last) time in their live, i.e. that they couldn't see anywhere else because its own maker didn't love it enough to promote it? People will only buy what they can see that the MANUFACTURER loves and properly supports, i.e. what they can see well advertised, supported and talked about. They DID love the design and UI, they DID NOT like the complete lack of support.



    YES, there was no money in developing for BB10 because availability of zillions of free or extremely cheap Android apps made native development uprofitable. As I already said, haven't I?


    Yes, I am a developer so I know the reasons. If BB10 wasn't Android-compatible, I would have been selling 50x more copies a day. Just like it was the case e.g. on tiny MeeGo (Nokia N9), i.e. a one-device platform with around 2 million users in total in its best time, yet bringing incomparably more sales due to *no* Android compatibility and therefore all users only buying native apps.


    Did I ever say anything else? Of course it didn't, due to the flood of Android apps. If one was forced to compete with Android apps, then he preferred to do it on Android itself.



    At least I am honest and I say what I think. As opposed to all those who stopped praising (and started bashing) BB10 overnight, right after Chen told them that Android is now the way to go. You guys go check what you were writing even just two years ago, and stop pretending that history hasn't proved you wrong, too.

    It looked the same on Symbian, where e.g. the AllaboutSymbian website still considered Symbian the best mobile OS on this planet even just one day before the infamous Elop memo, and the next day they had an illumination, launched AllAboutWindowsPhone site and wrote that Symbian was obsolete and Windows Phone was the future.

    Over & out.
    Very well said, agree to all the points. I know many won't agree as they are happy with their Android BlackBerry and they try to prove how BlackBerry android is better and efficient then bb10.

    Android is a hit just because of the apps Period. If bb10 has the same amount of Apps right from the beginning things might been different.

    If BlackBerry has still gone on developing and supporting bb10 to bb11 or bb12 with limited device and concentrating on developers on making popular apps for bb10 OS rather then going Android may be they would still be on Handset Division.

    Posted via CB10
    stlabrat likes this.
    01-07-17 10:16 AM
  8. Emaderton3's Avatar
    Very well said, agree to all the points. I know many won't agree as they are happy with their Android BlackBerry and they try to prove how BlackBerry android is better and efficient then bb10.

    Android is a hit just because of the apps Period. If bb10 has the same amount of Apps right from the beginning things might been different.

    If BlackBerry has still gone on developing and supporting bb10 to bb11 or bb12 with limited device and concentrating on developers on making popular apps for bb10 OS rather then going Android may be they would still be on Handset Division.

    Posted via CB10
    You can't force developers to make apps. BlackBerry offered conferences, workshops, and even financial incentives. It still didn't work. And you just can't pay a random developer to build an app for a popular one if the API is not available.

    Posted via CB10
    01-07-17 10:22 AM
  9. BurningPlatform's Avatar
    You can't force developers to make apps. BlackBerry offered conferences, workshops, and even financial incentives. It still didn't work. And you just can't pay a random developer to build an app for a popular one if the API is not available. Posted via CB10
    As Stephanie noted, it was completely irrelevant that they were offering "conferences, workshops and even financial incentives" if at the same time they were so strongly focusing on Android compatibility.

    Let me quote Stephanie, as what she wrote is exactly how it was:

    "I came to Crackberry in the fall of 2013 with the interest in bringing some of my apps to BB10. Even by then, it was already too late. The official advice from BlackBerry themselves at their dev blog was 'we support android apps, go write your app for android instead. Here's the tools if you insist on BB10 development but... seriously, go do android.'"

    Every new developer who came to BB10 and opened their developer portal for the first time could see that they supported multiple development platforms (Native, Android, HTML5, etc.) but it wasn't native what they clearly recommended. It was under the Android icon where they were praising it as 'great opportunity to develop for billions of devices, for BB10 and Android at once'.

    And add to it the BBW store where native apps were NEVER in any way distinguished or promoted (except for the small selection of BfB certified apps, which was only strengthening the impression that there were so few native apps for BB10 as lots of users thought that only apps with the BfB logo were native) and they were simply totally eclipsed by countless Android uploads, majority of them of hopeless quality (as those really good ones were not there, only some utter cr*p). That's the picture every developer was facing when considering whether to develop for BB10 or not.

    The best example of it was (and still is) the "New arrivals" category in BBW, where your native app didn't even have half an hour to remain visible as it was instantly flooded by 200 new Android and HTML5 submissions, 99% of them completely worthless and unusable (mostly feeds of websites created in an app generator), made only to show some Google ads. It was talking half an hour of scrolling through that sea of cr*p to reach the first USABLE app on that list. A completely discouraging experience for BOTH developers and all users.

    There were tens of thousands of native apps in BBW, but if you looked at it the impression you were getting was that there were just hundreds. Always the same few apps being featured on the Carousel all the time, same few apps PERMANENTLY being shown in all featured categories.

    Every time my app gets featured, I get lots of reviews like "I've been looking for such an app for ages!" while the app has been there for 4 years (!), just completely invisible.

    So, in reality, BlackBerry never did ANYTHING to truly promote development of native apps and to help developers make them discoverable (and thus sellable).

    There is nothing wrong in Android compatibility itself, but if BlackBerry ever really wanted to promote native development, native apps would have been clearly distinguished in BBW, positioned on top of search results above Android ports and on top of all featured categories, and so on. And there would have been a clear message to users like "We give you Android compatibility for millions of Android apps, but always be sure to look for native apps first as only they can give you the full BlackBerry experience and performance". There were NO such things, EVER.

    When we heard that in 10.3 they were going to add the Amazon store for Android apps, we all hoped that they'd finally remove all that cr*p from BBW and from that point it would finally become a place where native apps would find their true home and proper exposure. No, nothing like that. They didn't change absolutely anything, they just added Amazon, with no changes in BBW whatsoever. On the contrary, to make things even worse they dumped the BfB program, the ONLY way to have a native app distinguished and promoted in any way on BBW.

    Honestly, it couldn't be worse.
    Daniel Montanaro and stlabrat like this.
    01-07-17 01:37 PM
  10. Slash82's Avatar
    My company develops mobile apps to support our enterprise software. We did have BB10 apps. As we were planning our updates we met with BlackBerry last year. I can't reveal what they told us, but I can say we are new software will not have BB10 apps.
    Wow! That's a sad thing! :/

    And if that really is the case:
    This should tell us WHO stopped Facebook & WhatsApp for OS10.

    I'm pretty sure that BlackBerry is lying about "no more support".


    Posted via CB10
    01-07-17 02:01 PM
  11. conite's Avatar
    @BurningPlatform, you never really answered my porting statement.

    Netflix, Instagram, Candy Crush, and dozens more major Android apps worked perfectly and smoothly on BB10, but those developers didn't bother taking the 5 minutes to upload them to BBW with the free porting tool. Those developers had BlackBerry knocking at their doors every day.
    01-07-17 02:12 PM
  12. Emaderton3's Avatar
    Wasn't the runtime initially included to let Android developers see what their apps would look like on OS10? They were then encouraged to develop but that failed. The original vision was not for porting apps or running Android apps. They panicked with the app gap then started pushing the Amazon store.

    Posted via CB10
    stlabrat likes this.
    01-07-17 02:39 PM
  13. conite's Avatar
    Wasn't the runtime initially included to let Android developers see what their apps would look like on OS10? They were then encouraged to develop but that failed. The original vision was not for porting apps or running Android apps. They panicked with the app gap then started pushing the Amazon store.

    Posted via CB10
    True enough. Since there was so little uptake on their ported apps (those few who actually bothered), they saw no value in further development. Most of those app worked very, very well too.

    Big name apps needed to drive the whole process, and that just didn't happen. Then people returned their devices en masse, and/or never bothered to buy in the first place.
    01-07-17 02:49 PM
  14. StephanieMaks's Avatar
    You can't force developers to make apps. BlackBerry offered conferences, workshops, and even financial incentives. It still didn't work. And you just can't pay a random developer to build an app for a popular one if the API is not available
    As Stephanie noted, it was completely irrelevant that they were offering "conferences, workshops and even financial incentives" if at the same time they were so strongly focusing on Android compatibility.
    I should clarify that some of the things Emaderton3 mentioned and what I experienced did not happen simultaneously. I don't believe they started steering devs to Android till late 2013.

    IIRC when BB10 was just being unveiled and the Z10 was being kicked off, BlackBerry did offer all kinds of financial incentives and stuff like that. This would have been late 2012 or early 2013, I don't recall exactly. I was just a casual observer at that time as my time and energy was 100% on iOS development back then.

    It was not until autumn 2013 when I had wrapped up things on iOS and could then turn my attention to BB10. By that point there were no incentives, BlackBerry had already tried (and failed) to sell the company, and Thor was on his way out and Chen on his way in.

    That is the situation when I was ready to start on BB10 development, and that was definitely too late.

    However you slice it, my belief is that there were a lot of high hopes for BB10 at the start of 2013 but by the end of 2013 just about everyone involved knew it was dead.
    01-07-17 04:03 PM
  15. thurask's Avatar
    I should clarify that some of the things Emaderton3 mentioned and what I experienced did not happen simultaneously. I don't believe they started steering devs to Android till late 2013.

    IIRC when BB10 was just being unveiled and the Z10 was being kicked off, BlackBerry did offer all kinds of financial incentives and stuff like that. This would have been late 2012 or early 2013, I don't recall exactly. I was just a casual observer at that time as my time and energy was 100% on iOS development back then.

    It was not until autumn 2013 when I had wrapped up things on iOS and could then turn my attention to BB10. By that point there were no incentives, BlackBerry had already tried (and failed) to sell the company, and Thor was on his way out and Chen on his way in.

    That is the situation when I was ready to start on BB10 development, and that was definitely too late.

    However you slice it, my belief is that there were a lot of high hopes for BB10 at the start of 2013 but by the end of 2013 just about everyone involved knew it was dead.
    All the BlackBerry Jam conferences, port-a-thons and device giveaways were in 2012-13, up to BB10 launch.
    Elephant_Canyon likes this.
    01-07-17 04:15 PM
  16. StephanieMaks's Avatar
    All the BlackBerry Jam conferences, port-a-thons and device giveaways were in 2012-13, up to BB10 launch.
    Thanks for clarifying! I knew I'd missed the boat, but wasn't sure exactly when it had set sail.
    DrBoomBotz likes this.
    01-07-17 04:25 PM
  17. DecAway's Avatar
    There are a number of Android devices, along with iPhone, that have NIAP certification.

    I would imagine BlackBerry will make their application with the upcoming hardened Nougat, that BlackBerry claims is as secure as BB10.

    Do not minimise the importance of apps in the government and corporate sectors. As a matter of fact, BB10 can't even GET on some managed networks because of the lack of AirWatch, Citrix, SAP, IBM, and other EMM apps. Then you can start to list all of the business collaboration tools that are not compatible with BB10, and run out of room on the page.
    That's why I said "full" NIAP certification. There are multiple levels and blackberry is the only phone with full certification.

    Posted via CB10
    stlabrat likes this.
    01-07-17 05:34 PM
  18. eshropshire's Avatar
    That's why I said "full" NIAP certification. There are multiple levels and blackberry is the only phone with full certification.

    Posted via CB10
    I get tired of these type of comments I work with many US Fed Agencies. They use NAIP certified devices including iOS and select Android phones. I know of a few that still have some BBOS in use, but these are almost phased out. All devices have strong MDM control. I know of no US Fed Agency that has standardized on BB10 or has plans for BB10. Please let us know these agencies that can't work without this BB10 NAIP certification.
    01-07-17 06:50 PM
  19. ohaiguise's Avatar
    'Fully committed' means nothing more than 'we've still got some stock we want to try and sell you at full- or near-full price'.

    Anyone who thinks it means anything else is deluding themselves.
    StephanieMaks likes this.
    01-07-17 06:54 PM
  20. BurningPlatform's Avatar
    @BurningPlatform, you never really answered my porting statement. Netflix, Instagram, Candy Crush, and dozens more major Android apps worked perfectly and smoothly on BB10, but those developers didn't bother taking the 5 minutes to upload them to BBW with the free porting tool. Those developers had BlackBerry knocking at their doors every day.
    The only explanation I can find is that BlackBerry simply wasn't 'convincing' enough. Compared to BB10, MeeGo was an order of magnitude smaller platform, yet Nokia somehow managed to have native (and fully integrated with the OS) Skype client and a few others, too. So maybe BlackBerry shouldn't have "knocked at their door" but simply made a proper deal with them. They are commercial businesses, so I can't believe they'd refuse to get paid for something that - as you wrote - didn't really take any effort or investment. More likely, no one really offered them anything but "kind requests".

    Wasn't the runtime initially included to let Android developers see what their apps would look like on OS10? They were then encouraged to develop but that failed. The original vision was not for porting apps or running Android apps. They panicked with the app gap then started pushing the Amazon store.
    The Alien Dalvik Android runtime that BB10 (and Jolla too) now uses was developed by Myriad company long before BB10 came out, and for the first time it was demoed on the Nokia N900 (Maemo) and then on the N9 (Maemo Harmattan aka MeeGo) in 2010-2011.

    Myriad Alien Dalvik for Maemo (N900) by Myriad Group AG :: Maemo software @ My-Maemo.com
    Myriad Alien Dalvik for MeeGo Harmattan (Nokia N9 / N950 app) by Myriad Group AG :: MeeGo Harmattan software @ My-MeeGo.com

    From the very beginning its purpose was to fully integrate with the OS and make it possible to run Android apps the same way as native ones by END USERS, it was never meant to be just a tool for developers. It COSTED MONEY to licence it, so no one would have paid for it just to let developers test apps on it. Nokia didn't pay so it never came out for the N900, N9 and Symbian even though it was demoed on them and worked great, i.e. was ready for release.

    I don't know where you took that 'developer tool' idea from but it definitely wasn't true.

    I should clarify that some of the things Emaderton3 mentioned and what I experienced did not happen simultaneously. I don't believe they started steering devs to Android till late 2013.
    Even if they didn't explicitly promote Android development before late 2013, from the very beginning they weren't doing absolutely anything to have native apps distinguished and properly exposed in the BBW store. I got the Z10 in February 2013 or so and that's when I started developing for BB10, and already at that time BBW was literally FILLED UP with Android junk making it a challenge to find native apps diluted by counless Android and HTML5 apps and in no way distinguished. In most cases you needed to download an app and only after installation you could know if it was Android or native one as it wasn't (and still isn't) in any way indicated. People were downloading hopeless semi-working Android cr*p and thinking that native BB10 software was so poor, or vice versa - they were downloading a good working native app and thinking that it was an Android port. What a mess.

    IIRC when BB10 was just being unveiled and the Z10 was being kicked off, BlackBerry did offer all kinds of financial incentives and stuff like that.
    There were. But so what if the app store wasn't made to properly expose all those apps then. Even if you got attracted to the platform by some kind of incentive and you created a nice native app, it just DISAPPEARED in BBW among hundreds of thousands of horrible Android ports. Your app could not be found so it wasn't selling, and if it wasn't selling then you were kissing BB10 goodbye.

    Even on the niche Sailfish OS users FORCED Jolla at some point to distinguish Android apps from native ones in their store (by adding an Android icon to all Android apps), which I think is the best proof that users want to clearly see which apps are native and to be able to filter out non-native ports. BlackBerry never did it.

    --------

    One more thing. I came to BB10 from Symbian / MeeGo and I knew lots of Symbian / MeeGo developers who did the same. Why? Because BB10 is a Qt-based platform and it was extremely easy to port countless existing apps from Symbian and MeeGo. While porting to Cascades needed a few days, it was also possible to use Symbian or MeeGo apps on BB10 *DIRECTLY*, just by including Symbian or MeeGo Qt components in the project and rebuilding it, a matter of MINUTES. That's how I initially "ported" my apps (an HOUR of work per app at worst, if it needed a few tweaks to look better) and only then slowly ported them to Cascades and released as new versions.

    Back to the topic, in 2013 I could see hundreds of Symbian developers on BB10, attracted by how easy and quick it was to port their apps. But a year later there were none. Why? For the very reason I already wrote several times: because their apps simply disappeared in BBW and no one could find them there so they weren't earning anything. Those people very quickly realized that if they were forced to compete with countless Android apps then it only made sense to do it on Android itself. So they went away.

    Long story short: any incentives, contests, competitions etc. just won't do a thing, if then the app store doesn't let people find (read: buy) your apps. To have an app store where 5% of native apps are DILUTED among 95% of Android ports and there's not a single function to reach / prioritize native apps was the worst thing BlackBerry could do.

    P.S. This discussion is really funny. You're all pretending as if you weren't fully aware of how BBW has always been totally flooded with all that HTML5 and Android junk making native apps almost unfindable.
    Last edited by BurningPlatform; 01-07-17 at 07:27 PM.
    01-07-17 07:16 PM
  21. Emaderton3's Avatar
    Thank you StephanieMacks and Eshropshire for your clarifying posts.

    I got the info about the runtime being a developer tool from BlackBerry and the experts in these forums. It is widely known and accepted even if you do not want to believe it.

    BBW has a ton of issues. That is the one point I agree with.

    Posted via CB10
    BigBadWulf and StephanieMaks like this.
    01-07-17 07:19 PM
  22. BurningPlatform's Avatar
    I got the info about the runtime being a developer tool from BlackBerry and the experts in these forums. It is widely known and accepted even if you do not want to believe it.
    If it was a developer-only tool, it would have been available on Dev Alpha devices and in SDK Simulators only, or downloadable only to units with PIN numbers assigned to registered developer / BBW vendor accounts. As I said, it is a copyrighted stuff made by third party, whose licencing costs money, most probably per-copy. That's why on Sailfish OS the Android runtime isn't included in any community port for non-Jolla devices.

    It has nothing to do with believing or not, it's a fact.
    01-07-17 08:01 PM
  23. stlabrat's Avatar
    interesting. I thought hardware was the one not pushed to the front by carrier. (was in CA years ago, the carrier store got iphone flag ads,but BB was no where to be found - except the corner of display).. look like native app got the s- treatment as well. did heard about SDK not as very good in early days. Apple also got similar quality issues with app. Swift somehow made a bit better. May be a new hardware/software coupled close system a new language (or new rev... that is a lot of work) still going to save it... but that is almost impossible for BB, especially, the focus is on cars not phone.
    01-07-17 08:25 PM
  24. BigBadWulf's Avatar
    If it was a developer-only tool, it would have been available on Dev Alpha devices and in SDK Simulators only, or downloadable only to units with PIN numbers assigned to registered developer / BBW vendor accounts. As I said, it is a copyrighted stuff made by third party, whose licencing costs money, most probably per-copy. That's why on Sailfish OS the Android runtime isn't included in any community port for non-Jolla devices.

    It has nothing to do with believing or not, it's a fact.
    The clearest evidence, was the hoops that needed jumped through, in order to install an apk in the early BB10 versions.

    I agree CrapWorld was a mess, but I don't think it was impossible to find the quality apps. Furthermore, BlackBerry knew without a full store, with big names contained, they would never attract consumers. What were they to do, but push hard at porting? Not sure where you get your statistics on Google Play either, and would love some examples of quality apps with zero downloads from there.

    There were so many glaring reasons for BB10's failure by early 2013, pontificating about minutia is rather pointless. Nearly as pointless as dreaming there's still a future, or believing those who have accepted reality are haters.
    01-08-17 02:56 AM
  25. Superdupont 2_0's Avatar
    I really don't understand the issues some people have with BB10.

    I have chosen BB10 for the things it actually *can* do, and not for any "what could have been".
    Any company CTO who has chosen BB10 has probably made the choice for exactly the same reason.

    I am fairly sure this setup will continue to work for the next years, so, to me BB10 isn't dead, I actually just got my second Passport from Vodafone.

    I totally understand all people/companies, who have tested BB10 in 2013/2014 and decided against the platform for whatever reasons, but those who were happy in 2014 (after evaluation phase) will probably stay happy for the next several years.

    By the way, I still use my PlayBook on a daily base to check e-mails (Exchange 2013), browse the news websites, everything protected over VPN directly to my home router when I am outside... although the device is EOL for 3 years now.

    Oh, and by the way, Windows 7 is also dead.
    Still I have experienced so many issues with Windows 10, that I will stick to W7 until 2020.
    And it seems, I will do exactly the same for BB10... I could easily get equivalent results on Android or iOS, but the BB10 experience is so much more fun and I ain't missing anything.



    Posted via CB10
    ezubeBB2013 likes this.
    01-08-17 09:40 AM
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