03-11-11 08:19 AM
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  1. i7guy's Avatar
    02-25-11 03:48 PM
  2. Daniel Ratcliffe's Avatar
    Don't post that, the Android fanboys will say it's not a reliable source and that Android is secure, and they will also say a single BlackBerry can get 2.5 billion viruses per nanosecond without visiting any sites, receiving any emails, or any user intervention etc.
    espresso1967 likes this.
    02-25-11 03:54 PM
  3. tack's Avatar
    I don't think this is news to anyone, including Android fans. (Don't be catty (fixed ) as it makes you look bitter and small. Certainly makes you look like an opposing BB fanboy.)

    Few people would argue nor would they win if they did. BB is rock solid secure. It is well known. The question for me is do most want or need the extra security? I believe ignorance may weigh in the decisions, but many, many people have decided "no". Features that don't sustain sales or market leads have to be marketed better or they become irrelevant to buy decisions.
    Last edited by dbw1000; 02-27-11 at 11:00 AM.
    02-26-11 06:06 AM
  4. CranBerry413's Avatar
    Don't post that, the Android fanboys will say it's not a reliable source and that Android is secure, and they will also say a single BlackBerry can get 2.5 billion viruses per nanosecond without visiting any sites, receiving any emails, or any user intervention etc.
    Your humor was not lost on Everybody. I got it, and I appreciate it thoroughly.

    As far as the article , that was an interesting piece of writing. I think that there was a huge misconception that phones are immune to attack. I do commend the Apple phone for it's tight grip on Apps. Though hated, it does protect the Users. RIM does the same thing with it's apps.

    That is good to see from companies. Users generally don't know what can attack them, so having something looking out for them is in their best interest.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    02-26-11 07:49 AM
  5. Rickroller's Avatar
    Old news...

    Might as well make a thread about "Air more breathable than Nitrogen"

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    02-26-11 08:23 AM
  6. mark_rivers19's Avatar
    this is a no brainer article..seriously.
    02-26-11 09:35 AM
  7. i7guy's Avatar
    Old news...

    Might as well make a thread about "Air more breathable than Nitrogen"

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    It's not that it's old news, it's where it was published. To you it may be another rag piece, but there are people who take the reporting in the journal seriously.
    02-26-11 09:56 AM
  8. Jake Storm's Avatar
    ...Don't be caddy ....
    I don't think that word means what you think it means.
    02-26-11 10:00 AM
  9. Jake Storm's Avatar
    Not old news at all.
    In fact, with NFC and talk of using phones for payment and other sensitive activity, it's very timely and relevant.
    02-26-11 10:04 AM
  10. mikeplus1's Avatar
    I don't think that word means what you think it means.
    maybe they meant "catty"?
    02-26-11 10:26 AM
  11. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    Not old news at all.
    In fact, with NFC and talk of using phones for payment and other sensitive activity, it's very timely and relevant.
    Why is that? From an open-minded perspective, connectivity security is never one that comes up with all these platforms (i.e. intercepting communication protocols from them/sniffing network info). I would wager to say that whatever security checklists will be in place for NFC on one platform will probably be on another platform is there is a standard. However, what won't be on all platforms is handset lockout security. You know, the idea of password protecting the info stored in them, like the account numbers associated with your NFC capable app. On BB this info can be wiped if a password is typed in wrong so many times, but this isn't always the case on other smartphones where the device just doesn't let you in as opposed to wiping itself. This is why the 6-minute hack the iPhone video via JailBreak comes into play. Now, with that said, who's to say that everyone with a BB actually uses a password to secure their BB down. I look around to everyone around me that uses one while I'm out and about and about 2% of them actually type in a password to unlock them. Everyone else is open pickings for anyone who would swipe their NFC equipped phones. Think about that before you say your platform is super secure. Nothing is secure from stupidity of the user.
    02-26-11 10:39 AM
  12. Rickroller's Avatar
    Not old news at all.
    In fact, with NFC and talk of using phones for payment and other sensitive activity, it's very timely and relevant.
    But with NFC don't you need the phone physically in your hands in order to use it for a payment? I thought you needed to "scan" the code into the phone..and then make payment arrangements after that.. If so..i'm sorry but that's still not a big deal in my mind. If i'm leaving my phone lying about often enough to be a target for theft..then I can see it being an issue. If I lost my phone that's when I make a call and report it lost..thus deactiviting it. Or if i'm really worried its somehow gotten into the wrong hands..remote wipe it.

    "This allowed hackers to manipulate text messages, steal contact lists, place calls, visit Web sites and quietly download files."

    I'd be more worried if they were accessing bank information and doing wire transfers than "manipulating" text messages. Maybe i'm missing something though..

    I think "security" all boils down to personal use. If I worked in a job where I constantly carried "secret" information that I was worried about someone getting, or if I was the type of person who was constantly forgetting about or leaving behind my phone..perhaps I'd be more concerned about it. But my phone never leaves my side. When I leave a restaurant..i always make sure I have my keys, wallet, and cellphone. I'm more worried about card "skimmers" and whatnot from ATM's than I am someone hacking my phone and stealing my contacts (so they can send spam emails?..). But maybe that's just me..
    Last edited by Rickroller; 02-26-11 at 10:47 AM.
    02-26-11 10:42 AM
  13. howarmat's Avatar
    Why is that? From an open-minded perspective, connectivity security is never one that comes up with all these platforms (i.e. intercepting communication protocols from them/sniffing network info). I would wager to say that whatever security checklists will be in place for NFC on one platform will probably be on another platform is there is a standard. However, what won't be on all platforms is handset lockout security. You know, the idea of password protecting the info stored in them, like the account numbers associated with your NFC capable app. On BB this info can be wiped if a password is typed in wrong so many times, but this isn't always the case on other smartphones where the device just doesn't let you in as opposed to wiping itself. This is why the 6-minute hack the iPhone video via JailBreak comes into play. Now, with that said, who's to say that everyone with a BB actually uses a password to secure their BB down. I look around to everyone around me that uses one while I'm out and about and about 2% of them actually type in a password to unlock them. Everyone else is open pickings for anyone who would swipe their NFC equipped phones. Think about that before you say your platform is super secure. Nothing is secure from stupidity of the user.
    exactly, its the same across the board.

    and whoever said BB polices appworld is wrong too. Look into jared company or read the reviews for apps and get back to me on how App world is patrolled.
    02-26-11 10:45 AM
  14. i7guy's Avatar
    Why is that? From an open-minded perspective, connectivity security is never one that comes up with all these platforms (i.e. intercepting communication protocols from them/sniffing network info). I would wager to say that whatever security checklists will be in place for NFC on one platform will probably be on another platform is there is a standard. However, what won't be on all platforms is handset lockout security. You know, the idea of password protecting the info stored in them, like the account numbers associated with your NFC capable app. On BB this info can be wiped if a password is typed in wrong so many times, but this isn't always the case on other smartphones where the device just doesn't let you in as opposed to wiping itself. This is why the 6-minute hack the iPhone video via JailBreak comes into play. Now, with that said, who's to say that everyone with a BB actually uses a password to secure their BB down. I look around to everyone around me that uses one while I'm out and about and about 2% of them actually type in a password to unlock them. Everyone else is open pickings for anyone who would swipe their NFC equipped phones. Think about that before you say your platform is super secure. Nothing is secure from stupidity of the user.
    The point is RIM can allow the user to either leave their phone unsecured to secure it to the nth degree. It's pretty much immune from casual drive-bys when the phone is set up properly. The doesn't make the platform unsecure, it makes it as secure as the user wants. You are debating that a device is unsecure because the manufacturer allows that option. The question really is when the device is secured properly how unsecure is it?
    Jake Storm likes this.
    02-26-11 10:58 AM
  15. Rickroller's Avatar
    The doesn't make the platform unsecure, it makes it as secure as the user wants. You are debating that a device is unsecure because the manufacturer allows that option. The question really is when the device is secured properly how unsecure is it?
    +1..I can agree with that. However, I think as is being discussed in another thread..that BB's could be just as susceptible as other platforms in the Appworld due to the lack of "policing" of apps.
    02-26-11 11:29 AM
  16. avt123's Avatar
    Old. We already know this. Especially when this is preached almost every single day on this site lol.
    Last edited by avt123; 02-26-11 at 12:29 PM.
    02-26-11 12:27 PM
  17. MrObvious's Avatar
    Actually this is a new problem. Before when computers were dominant we had to make double sure the virus scanners were working and double check everything. Well boop, here comes smartphones, that basically do everything the computer can but smaller. So what do attackers do? Crack the smartphones! I think they just don't go after Blackberry because it isn't as popular as the iOS or Android platforms. It might be due to better coding too and encryption available but I'm sure there are just as many exploits you can find in these devices if you try hard enough.
    02-26-11 01:47 PM
  18. K Bear's Avatar
    A device is only as secure as the user makes it. I don't care what device you have, you can be hacked if you don't pay attention to what you are giving permissions to or have your password strength set to.
    02-26-11 03:40 PM
  19. Daniel Ratcliffe's Avatar
    I use a password of strength 2/4 usually. Sometimes 3/4 (8+ characters, numbers, and letters of mixed case, don't use symbols). I have a 3 incorrect attempt wipe though. However, my phone could easily be cracked in 2.5 seconds. How? The Jared Company. I started sending 5k texts more a month than I usually do because of 1 app from that company. And there is no way to unsubscribe (I already have hit the unsub link, they still send their spam). So to preach that BlackBerry is the super-sonic-undisputed-giga-unhackable-secure device is to be delusional. It CAN be hacked, but when secured properly, minus TJC, it is more secure).
    02-26-11 03:51 PM
  20. K Bear's Avatar
    I use a password of strength 2/4 usually. Sometimes 3/4 (8+ characters, numbers, and letters of mixed case, don't use symbols). I have a 3 incorrect attempt wipe though. However, my phone could easily be cracked in 2.5 seconds. How? The Jared Company. I started sending 5k texts more a month than I usually do because of 1 app from that company. And there is no way to unsubscribe (I already have hit the unsub link, they still send their spam). So to preach that BlackBerry is the super-sonic-undisputed-giga-unhackable-secure device is to be delusional. It CAN be hacked, but when secured properly, minus TJC, it is more secure).
    It's people like you I feel sorry for. You downloaded an app from a trusted source (App World) and still we're hacked.
    howarmat likes this.
    02-26-11 03:59 PM
  21. JRSCCivic98's Avatar
    I use a password of strength 2/4 usually. Sometimes 3/4 (8+ characters, numbers, and letters of mixed case, don't use symbols). I have a 3 incorrect attempt wipe though. However, my phone could easily be cracked in 2.5 seconds. How? The Jared Company. I started sending 5k texts more a month than I usually do because of 1 app from that company. And there is no way to unsubscribe (I already have hit the unsub link, they still send their spam). So to preach that BlackBerry is the super-sonic-undisputed-giga-unhackable-secure device is to be delusional. It CAN be hacked, but when secured properly, minus TJC, it is more secure).
    Maybe people in your situation should file a lawsuit against RIM and their inability to properly screen out the apps they allow people to submit to their store. I haven't read the agreement for AppWorld word for word (mostly because I didn't use crAppWorld to begin with) so I can't tell you if you have a case or not. For all I know they could have worded that with the standard "Whatever you download for our bullisht store is all on you" security and liability perspective, but a smart lawyer should be able to argue that when RIM goes ahead with whitepapers and industry docs and recognition that their platform is the most secure for both business and personal use, that a certain amount of "trust" is automatically bought into by any user who uses any of their hardware/software services and because of that, they can't simply get out of it with a bs disclaimer as that for the apps they host. There is after all some credibility with RIM that allows users to blindly trust anything linked to their name and because of that, normal human nature would conclude that everything they're involved with is inherently more secure. This should be the kind of argument a smart lawyer should bring up to a judge in such a case. Guaranteed that an impartial and ethically logical judge would side with the consumer on such a case.

    There is far too much crap corporations get away with by simply using disclaimers... it needs to stop once and for all.


    *Disclaimer*
    Please note that the above written post was not the intended or documented viewpoint of JRSCCivic98 or the person/persons this username is assigned or linked to in any way, shape, or form.
    02-26-11 05:17 PM
  22. i7guy's Avatar
    I use a password of strength 2/4 usually. Sometimes 3/4 (8+ characters, numbers, and letters of mixed case, don't use symbols). I have a 3 incorrect attempt wipe though. However, my phone could easily be cracked in 2.5 seconds. How? The Jared Company. I started sending 5k texts more a month than I usually do because of 1 app from that company. And there is no way to unsubscribe (I already have hit the unsub link, they still send their spam). So to preach that BlackBerry is the super-sonic-undisputed-giga-unhackable-secure device is to be delusional. It CAN be hacked, but when secured properly, minus TJC, it is more secure).
    Its not really hacked, its more like social engineering. After all the app didn't magically install on your phone. A bad app that wants to interface to your email looks the same to the OS as a good app.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    02-26-11 10:30 PM
  23. qbnkelt's Avatar
    Sometimes the most obvious answer is the one that is right in front of your nose, regardless how much you might want to argue or come up with convoluted justifications against it.
    Goes to security on smartphones and good security practices. I have my BBerries and will get the iP5. I'll be happy with those.
    02-27-11 06:39 AM
  24. Daniel Ratcliffe's Avatar
    Its not really hacked, its more like social engineering. After all the app didn't magically install on your phone. A bad app that wants to interface to your email looks the same to the OS as a good app.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    Yet it continued doing it after a security wipe of ALL apps and PIM data? Wow, their social engineering tactics are really aimed at irremovable spamming... Looks like when I get it back, if Carphone haven't fixed it, then simply brick it and reload the OS from there...
    02-27-11 06:42 AM
  25. i7guy's Avatar
    Yet it continued doing it after a security wipe of ALL apps and PIM data? Wow, their social engineering tactics are really aimed at irremovable spamming... Looks like when I get it back, if Carphone haven't fixed it, then simply brick it and reload the OS from there...
    Once your email address is transmitted to a malicious server yes you can get spammed. It has nothing to do with your phone.

    Posted from my CrackBerry at wapforums.crackberry.com
    02-27-11 07:05 AM
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