08-29-15 08:09 PM
28 12
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  1. Tranamal's Avatar
    I was reading a local newspaper and saw an article "BlackBerry works to make shoddy IT security illegal". Basically it was about the security conference BlackBerry had a week or two ago. What caught my attention was the part where I have highlighted. It says several BlackBerry big names rivals, big names everyone heard of are opting out of the security committee. See attachments.
    BlackBerry Competitors Don't Care About Security!!!-img_20150804_171301.jpg
    BlackBerry Competitors Don't Care About Security!!!-img_20150804_171336.jpg

    Wife Z10, daughter got my old Z10 and me with the awesome new World Z30. That's how we roll baby!
    08-04-15 05:47 PM
  2. Bla1ze's Avatar
    08-04-15 05:52 PM
  3. Tranamal's Avatar
    That's pretty fast acting there Bla1ze. I just press post and less than a minute later you added a link.

    Wife Z10, daughter got my old Z10 and me with the awesome new World Z30. That's how we roll baby!
    08-04-15 06:01 PM
  4. BCITMike's Avatar
    This is going to sound like a nit, but when you said "big names everyone heard of are opting out of the security committee", I got the impression they were IN and then decided to leave. Instead, they just opted not to JOIN. "Opting out" to join the committee may be correct, but I didn't read it that way. It's kind of a non-point, really. You could have ended the title with, "News at 11".
    08-04-15 09:52 PM
  5. Tranamal's Avatar
    You are right, my bad. I was trying to watch my daughter's soccer game and post this at the same time.

    Wife Z10, daughter got my old Z10 and me with the awesome new World Z30. That's how we roll baby!
    08-04-15 10:02 PM
  6. mithrazor's Avatar
    BlackBerry's security on the consumer end is the same as rivals.

    BlackBerry should really offer a security service for consumers. BES Cloud for consumers or something.

    Posted via CB10
    08-05-15 12:08 AM
  7. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    BlackBerry's security on the consumer end is the same as rivals.

    BlackBerry should really offer a security service for consumers. BES Cloud for consumers or something.

    Posted via CB10
    Can you count unrootable devices ?
    I know this has pretty much no sense / features impact for Joes.
    Therefore barely a sales argument.
    But claiming it's the 'same as rivals' in not accurate.


    Posted via CB10
    BlackQtCoder likes this.
    08-05-15 04:50 AM
  8. mithrazor's Avatar
    Can you count unrootable devices ?
    I know this has pretty much no sense / features impact for Joes.
    Therefore barely a sales argument.
    But claiming it's the 'same as rivals' in not accurate.


    Posted via CB10
    Let me adjust my statement. About the same as rivals*

    At least with rooting the device on rival phones you have the capability to introduce new features developed by the community.

    Not sure if not being able to root a device is a benefit or a hindrance TBH.

    Posted via CB10
    08-05-15 10:05 AM
  9. Bluenoser63's Avatar
    Let me adjust my statement. About the same as rivals*

    At least with rooting the device on rival phones you have the capability to introduce new features developed by the community.

    Not sure if not being able to root a device is a benefit or a hindrance TBH.

    Posted via CB10
    New features is a code word for viruses and hacks. Rooting a device means you are bypassing security. I won't own a phone that is vulnerable to hacking.
    08-05-15 11:29 AM
  10. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    This article was about medial device and not about smartphones.... not sure who those unnamed competitors where, but I don't think Google or Apple are pursuing the medical OS and infrastructure business at this time.

    Most likely these are companies that are already selling medical products and don't want more regulations forced upon them. But it does sound like there are some major risks with older equiment.... so the question becomes are the manufactures improving their products on their own. And then who tells a facility when they MUST replace older equipment. BlackBerry has a solution for a problem, but right now they don't seem to have anyone interested in it. So they'd like the government to force the issue.

    MEDJACK: Hackers hijacking medical devices to create backdoors in hospital networks | Computerworld
    08-05-15 11:51 AM
  11. Maxxxpower's Avatar
    Consumers don't care about security.
    08-05-15 12:06 PM
  12. Bluenoser63's Avatar
    Consumers don't care about security.
    Until they get hacked and their identify stolen and then they do. Why go through all the hassle?
    DJM626 and Superdupont 2_0 like this.
    08-05-15 12:39 PM
  13. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    Until they get hacked and their identify stolen and then they do. Why go through all the hassle?
    Because it doesn't happen very often.....

    How many people do you know that have had their phone "hacked"?
    How many people do you know that have had their identity stolen because of their smartphone?

    Does it happen, yes. Is it a common enough occurrence that it puts Security and Privacy ahead of being able to easily install apps.... so far it doesn't.


    It's like having a security system on your home... It is a great solution's for protection your home and your family, but lot's of people don't do it.
    08-05-15 12:58 PM
  14. Bluenoser63's Avatar
    Because it doesn't happen very often.....

    How many people do you know that have had their phone "hacked"?
    How many people do you know that have had their identity stolen because of their smartphone?

    Does it happen, yes. Is it a common enough occurrence that it puts Security and Privacy ahead of being able to easily install apps.... so far it doesn't.


    It's like having a security system on your home... It is a great solution's for protection your home and your family, but lot's of people don't do it.
    Your proof that it doesn't happen very often? What is not too often? Seems like you haven't been paying attention. The last numbers I saw for 2014 was about 1% of phones were hacked. Most people wouldn't know that they were hacked. The fact that a single MMS can infect about a billion Android phones and most of those phones will never be patched isn't a good sign.
    08-05-15 03:08 PM
  15. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    Your proof that it doesn't happen very often? What is not too often? Seems like you haven't been paying attention. The last numbers I saw for 2014 was about 1% of phones were hacked. Most people wouldn't know that they were hacked. The fact that a single MMS can infect about a billion Android phones and most of those phones will never be patched isn't a good sign.
    I'll take your percentage, so if you know 100 people... only one of them has ever been hacked? That to me would qualify as not very often, especially when I don't go into that much detail with every one I know. So if I know 300 people, only three have been hacked but I'm not really close to them... I might not even know it happened to them... Thus I truthfully don't really know of anyone that has been hacked.

    But I'm just pointing out from my experience and the experience of a number of other posters here.... it's just not a common enough event to cause the average person to be concerned. Because like me they have been using Windows Computers for years and they have listened to all the security issues that Windows has had... and yet the world didn't come to an end (even in 2000 when we all taught our PC were going to explode).

    I'm not saying that security isn't important, I'm saying that people don't always see a threat.... until it comes up and bites them in the buttocks.
    08-05-15 04:51 PM
  16. DenverRalphy's Avatar
    Seems like you haven't been paying attention. The last numbers I saw for 2014 was about 1% of phones were hacked. Most people wouldn't know that they were hacked. The fact that a single MMS can infect about a billion Android phones and most of those phones will never be patched isn't a good sign.
    I've been paying attention. And today it was revealed that 90% of Android devices are already protected against the attack due to ASLR having been implemented since Android 4.0. It turns out the 900 million number was greatly exaggerated. So basically it's only the 2.x devices that are really vulnerable (there's effectively zero 3.x devices left in the world).


    Penned via Tapatalk
    Dunt Dunt Dunt and BCITMike like this.
    08-05-15 05:47 PM
  17. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    Let me adjust my statement. About the same as rivals*

    At least with rooting the device on rival phones you have the capability to introduce new features developed by the community.

    Not sure if not being able to root a device is a benefit or a hindrance TBH.

    Posted via CB10
    That's precisely why BlackBerry devices still hold the upper grade in terms of security (exclude Bond toys). Unrootable means you can decide what is legit and what is not. And until then, you can't be secure.
    It's fundamental, not enough as such, yet mandatory.

    Posted via CB10
    08-05-15 07:06 PM
  18. canuckvoip's Avatar
    BlackBerry's security on the consumer end is the same as rivals.

    BlackBerry should really offer a security service for consumers. BES Cloud for consumers or something.

    Posted via CB10
    Disagree completely. iOS has 537 vulnerabilities currently. I think BB has one.
    Apple Iphone Os : List of security vulnerabilities
    I like your BES for consumers idea though.
    BCITMike likes this.
    08-05-15 07:43 PM
  19. Superdupont 2_0's Avatar
    [...] And today it was revealed that 90% of Android devices are already protected against the attack due to ASLR having been implemented since Android 4.0. It turns out the 900 million number was greatly exaggerated. [...] Penned via Tapatalk
    Ars cited "exaggerated the threat it posed to real-world users" and that ASLR "is designed to significantly lessen the damage".
    See http://arstechnica.com/security/2015...-if-its-fixed/

    That means ASLR can mitigate many "simple" attack forms, but not fully protect the device (from more sophisticated attacks).
    No doubt that ASLR is a good thing, but it is even better that vendors will fix the vulnerability with an update.


    By the way, there are more problems coming up:
    http://thehackernews.com/2015/08/and...t-bug.html?m=1








    Posted via CB10
    08-06-15 06:03 AM
  20. Superdupont 2_0's Avatar
    Because it doesn't happen very often.....

    How many people do you know that have had their phone "hacked"?
    .
    Google "Murphy's Law"and "Entropy".
    For me there is far too much "potential" in Android waiting to happen.


    Posted via CB10
    08-06-15 06:24 AM
  21. DenverRalphy's Avatar
    Ars cited "exaggerated the threat it posed to real-world users" and that ASLR "is designed to significantly lessen the damage".
    See Google pushes fixes for critical code-execution bug in Android | Ars Technica

    That means ASLR can mitigate many "simple" attack forms, but not fully protect the device (from more sophisticated attacks).
    No doubt that ASLR is a good thing, but it is even better that vendors will fix the vulnerability with an update.
    \
    Yeah, the ASLR isn't an end solution. But realistically, with the Stagefright bug, the most that would happen is that it crashes the phone requiring a reboot/restart. Annoying as heck, but not much of a security issue. A more sophisticated attack that could capitalize upon it would likely require physical access to the device, which would basically negate the need to use the Stagefright exploit because there would be more efficient and effective methods to hack the device once they have it in their possession.
    08-06-15 09:02 AM
  22. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    BlackBerry's security on the consumer end is the same as rivals.
    ...

    Posted via CB10
    If that's what you reckon... :-)))

    Sure that wouldn't happen with BlackBerry :

    http://www.extremetech.com/mobile/21...ted-plain-text

    That's real SMH stuff if they don't know what world-readable means. Even a Linux newbie that's done a few stunts at the commandline would have figured that one out... :-)



      BB10 -- Finger flickin' good... in any form factor!  
    BCITMike likes this.
    08-12-15 05:40 PM
  23. BCITMike's Avatar
    Yeah, the ASLR isn't an end solution. But realistically, with the Stagefright bug, the most that would happen is that it crashes the phone requiring a reboot/restart. Annoying as heck, but not much of a security issue. A more sophisticated attack that could capitalize upon it would likely require physical access to the device, which would basically negate the need to use the Stagefright exploit because there would be more efficient and effective methods to hack the device once they have it in their possession.
    A denial of service is indeed a security issue.
    08-12-15 06:27 PM
  24. GadgetTravel's Avatar
    Consumers don't care about security.
    Consumers in many cases care about security. But it ALWAYS a trade off between security and functionality. Many of us will sacrifice some security, I'm actually not convinced we are but let's say so for the moment, for a high functional phone rather than a BB. I have had personal data possibly exposed 3 times. None of them were by phone hack. All were on servers that were compromised. The phone risk is pretty low and using things like VPNs can make it even lower.
    08-20-15 08:51 PM
  25. Kurdis Blough's Avatar
    I will be concerned about the ability to root (administrator privileges) Android devices the day Microsoft blocks those same privileges on Windows.

    It's really a silly distinction.

    !
    08-20-15 09:03 PM
28 12

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