1. nrkbb's Avatar
    Bangladesh bans BB service as it does not have the capability to decipher encrypted communications.
    Regulator directs GP, Airtel to discontinue BlackBerry services
    02-20-14 09:14 AM
  2. DurdenLunarius's Avatar
    Didn't BlackBerry address this with another country before? Essentially stating that they do not have the 'keys' to decrypting the messages as they're handled by the handsets themselves, not at the NOC level? I remember the talk of building a BB Server center in that country, but they told the government that it still wouldn't solve what they were asking, which was to monitor what was in the messages themselves.
    Cold Dog likes this.
    02-20-14 09:23 AM
  3. qwerty4ever's Avatar
    Didn't BlackBerry address this with another country before? Essentially stating that they do not have the 'keys' to decrypting the messages as they're handled by the handsets themselves, not at the NOC level? I remember the talk of building a BB Server center in that country, but they told the government that it still wouldn't solve what they were asking, which was to monitor what was in the messages themselves.
    For BIS subscribers the common encryption key is shared amongst all the smartphones and BlackBerry holds the private and public key-pair. For BES subscribers the encryption key is stored on the BES server in the database; I am not sure whether each smartphone has an unique public-private key-pair or are shared amongst all smartphones activated against that particular BES instance. The BlackBerry 10 smartphones likely share a common encryption key at least for BBM and probably PIN-to-PIN messages although BES 10 users might - I stress might - have their keys stored on their BES server in the database.

    The only safe communication these days is face-to-face meeting and writing down the "conversation" on a sheet of blank paper using a wood-and-graphite pencil after which meeting comes to a conclusion the sheet of paper is burned immediately prior to leaving the meeting location and the ashes left untouched. You do not want your DNA intermingled with those ashes. Oh, ignite the paper with a lighter not a match since possession of a burnt match could be indicative of a crime, your DNA transfers to the match stick (wood or paper) so leaving the burnt match at the meeting location could be used against you, and the sulpher (sulfur) from the burning match might transfer to your skin, hair, and clothes. Lastly, do not bring your smartphone, even if in the powered down state, nor your GPS-enabled vehicle to the meeting location.
    ssbtech likes this.
    02-20-14 09:45 AM
  4. nrkbb's Avatar
    BB pulled out of the agreement to place a server in Bangladesh. Funny thing is the biggest BB user is the Prime Minister's Office
    02-20-14 10:00 AM
  5. Karan Mohal's Avatar
    For BIS subscribers the common encryption key is shared amongst all the smartphones and BlackBerry holds the private and public key-pair. For BES subscribers the encryption key is stored on the BES server in the database; I am not sure whether each smartphone has an unique public-private key-pair or are shared amongst all smartphones activated against that particular BES instance. The BlackBerry 10 smartphones likely share a common encryption key at least for BBM and probably PIN-to-PIN messages although BES 10 users might - I stress might - have their keys stored on their BES server in the database.

    The only safe communication these days is face-to-face meeting and writing down the "conversation" on a sheet of blank paper using a wood-and-graphite pencil after which meeting comes to a conclusion the sheet of paper is burned immediately prior to leaving the meeting location and the ashes left untouched. You do not want your DNA intermingled with those ashes. Oh, ignite the paper with a lighter not a match since possession of a burnt match could be indicative of a crime, your DNA transfers to the match stick (wood or paper) so leaving the burnt match at the meeting location could be used against you, and the sulpher (sulfur) from the burning match might transfer to your skin, hair, and clothes. Lastly, do not bring your smartphone, even if in the powered down state, nor your GPS-enabled vehicle to the meeting location.
    Wow. You seem like the kind of user that would benefit from the "Black ops maps" app
    02-20-14 11:12 AM
  6. AnimalPak200's Avatar
    lol

    Posted via CB10
    02-20-14 11:25 AM
  7. DurdenLunarius's Avatar
    ...

    The only safe communication these days is face-to-face meeting and writing down the "conversation" on a sheet of blank paper using a wood-and-graphite pencil after which meeting comes to a conclusion the sheet of paper is burned immediately prior to leaving the meeting location and the ashes left untouched. You do not want your DNA intermingled with those ashes. Oh, ignite the paper with a lighter not a match since possession of a burnt match could be indicative of a crime, your DNA transfers to the match stick (wood or paper) so leaving the burnt match at the meeting location could be used against you, and the sulpher (sulfur) from the burning match might transfer to your skin, hair, and clothes. Lastly, do not bring your smartphone, even if in the powered down state, nor your GPS-enabled vehicle to the meeting location.
    Or just learn the art of not being caught from Dexter! (Pre-Season 6 of course. I think the general consensus is that Season 4 was the zenith.)
    02-20-14 11:54 AM
  8. milo53's Avatar
    Emerging market?
    02-20-14 04:18 PM
  9. BanffMoose's Avatar
    Emerging market?
    "Disappearing Markets?"

    Seriously BlackBerry should just abandon security, or do as Umi suggested (I'm sure others as well) and create a line of cell phones that can't pair with BES10. BES is really what's slowing BlackBerry down because turning out hardware and software/OS is easier if you don't worry about security or controlling the device. It's at the heart of India, Saudi Arabia, Bangladesh and others from threatening to lock BlackBerry out of their countries. BlackBerry only gets derided by the market for losing another market and the uninformed masses accuse BlackBerry of caving in and selling users out to the government. Meanwhile the competitors are extolled for not caving in (because they never offered any security or privacy in the first place).

    Instead BlackBerry should take their "control" features and market them to parents seeking to control their kids' cell phone usage. Use a parent oriented BES Cloud-type service to control when and who kids can call, text, BBM, surf the Web, access social media, play games, etc. Parents the world over will be buying their kids a "Jakarta." Kids will hate BlackBerry growing up, but will buy a BlackBerry for their kids. And given the rate we add kids to this world, BlackBerry would have a big, big market to satisfy.

    Oh, then do as PC manufacturers do, experiment with the bleeding edge on the consumer line and gradually add useful, tested features and control and security to the enterprise/BES line of phones.

    Too much to ask?
    milo53 likes this.
    02-20-14 08:39 PM
  10. BCITMike's Avatar
    "Disappearing Markets?"

    Seriously BlackBerry should just abandon security, or do as Umi suggested (I'm sure others as well) and create a line of cell phones that can't pair with BES10. BES is really what's slowing BlackBerry down because turning out hardware and software/OS is easier if you don't worry about security or controlling the device. It's at the heart of India, Saudi Arabia, Bangladesh and others from threatening to lock BlackBerry out of their countries. BlackBerry only gets derided by the market for losing another market and the uninformed masses accuse BlackBerry of caving in and selling users out to the government. Meanwhile the competitors are extolled for not caving in (because they never offered any security or privacy in the first place).

    Instead BlackBerry should take their "control" features and market them to parents seeking to control their kids' cell phone usage. Use a parent oriented BES Cloud-type service to control when and who kids can call, text, BBM, surf the Web, access social media, play games, etc. Parents the world over will be buying their kids a "Jakarta." Kids will hate BlackBerry growing up, but will buy a BlackBerry for their kids. And given the rate we add kids to this world, BlackBerry would have a big, big market to satisfy.

    Oh, then do as PC manufacturers do, experiment with the bleeding edge on the consumer line and gradually add useful, tested features and control and security to the enterprise/BES line of phones.

    Too much to ask?
    They should buy a home server media type of company, like Tonido. Throw it on Windows Home Server 2011 ($60?), license 5 devices for $100, and you have a home based product that can sell millions.
    02-20-14 08:51 PM
  11. Thesmartmale's Avatar
    Didn't BlackBerry address this with another country before? Essentially stating that they do not have the 'keys' to decrypting the messages as they're handled by the handsets themselves, not at the NOC level? I remember the talk of building a BB Server center in that country, but they told the government that it still wouldn't solve what they were asking, which was to monitor what was in the messages themselves.
    Lol I know which country was that :P

    Posted via CB10
    02-21-14 04:53 AM
  12. JonCBK's Avatar
    Lol I know which country was that :P

    Posted via CB10
    I thought it was Saudi Arabia that was demanding access to blackberry messaging. It will be interesting what happens as facebook starts mining more information from whatsapp. My understanding is that whatsapp doesn't currently mine that much. But at $19 billion puchase price that is clearly not the long term goal.

    Posted via CB10
    02-21-14 08:26 AM
  13. Thesmartmale's Avatar
    I thought it was Saudi Arabia that was demanding access to blackberry messaging. It will be interesting what happens as facebook starts mining more information from whatsapp. My understanding is that whatsapp doesn't currently mine that much. But at $19 billion puchase price that is clearly not the long term goal.

    Posted via CB10
    Lol yeah it was Saudi Arabia, and they had plans to ban Whatsapp but something stopped them at the last second, hope they reconsider it.

    Posted via CB10
    02-21-14 11:55 AM
  14. TheScionicMan's Avatar
    Lol yeah it was Saudi Arabia, and they had plans to ban Whatsapp but something stopped them at the last second, hope they reconsider it.

    Posted via CB10
    They probably realized how full of security holes it was...
    Thesmartmale likes this.
    02-21-14 08:51 PM
  15. Thesmartmale's Avatar
    They probably realized how full of security holes it was...
    LOL!

    Posted via CB10
    02-22-14 07:13 AM
  16. cgangoli's Avatar
    Lol yeah it was Saudi Arabia, and they had plans to ban Whatsapp but something stopped them at the last second, hope they reconsider it.

    Posted via CB10
    The Indian government too has been provided with the means for what over here is euphemistically called 'lawful interception'. There was a long standoff between BlackBerry and the GoI with BlackBerry at one time claiming that only the devices had decryption keys and that it was therefore impossible to comply with the government's snooping requests. Faced finally with a Hobson's choice, BlackBerry did cave in. So, if you think that your BlackBerry is NSA proof, think again.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/indiahome...r-service.html



    Posted via CB10
    02-23-14 06:17 AM
  17. beemaabeemababy's Avatar
    A friend of mine confirmed that he can't use BBM in Bangladesh unless if he pays 25 per month for the carrier to allow him to the it. What a rip off.

    Too sad.

    Posted via CB10
    02-24-14 04:50 AM
  18. badiyee's Avatar
    The Indian government too has been provided with the means for what over here is euphemistically called 'lawful interception'. There was a long standoff between BlackBerry and the GoI with BlackBerry at one time claiming that only the devices had decryption keys and that it was therefore impossible to comply with the government's snooping requests. Faced finally with a Hobson's choice, BlackBerry did cave in. So, if you think that your BlackBerry is NSA proof, think again.

    No secrets on Blackberry: Security services to intercept data after government gets its way on messenger service | Mail Online



    Posted via CB10
    So If India can, USA had?

    Unless you're insinuating USA is hacking into India's monitoring system to monitor BBM messages, which is still illegal.
    02-24-14 06:32 AM
  19. qwerty4ever's Avatar
    Wow. You seem like the kind of user that would benefit from the "Black ops maps" app
    Funny. But when I was consulting for the Government of Canada years ago I regularly engaged in thought experiments when approaching the building(s) where I worked trying to come up with a means to avoid the surveillance cameras, security patrols, and get into the lobby and take-out the security staff behind the counter without raising any alarms. It was fun running through various scenarios each week with the objective of defeating my own plan if at all possible. Today, such thought experiments would likely result in the label "terrorist", the misappropriated term "terroristic acts", and a bed within the walls of a maximum security prison. Club Gitmo in Cuba with its warm climate would be a dream compared to Stony Mountain Institution in Alberta, Canada.

    BlackBerry has a Black Ops Map app?
    03-01-14 12:08 PM
  20. Karan Mohal's Avatar
    Yep! Looks nice, but pricey.

    http://appworld.blackberry.com/webst...ntent/18561034



    Posted via CB10
    03-01-14 09:59 PM

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