12-07-14 10:32 PM
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  1. BACK-2-BLACK's Avatar
    To be held Dec 3 and 4th, 2014.

    Blackberry seems to be the only mobile maker to be participating. (NantHealth also part of this forum)

    WOW. This is getting big... what do you all think?

    ================================================== =================================================

    LINK: Forbes Healthcare Summit 2014

    "Forbes Healthcare Summit: Smart Data Transforming Lives

    How big will the data get? This year we may collect more data about the human body than in all the history of medicine so far. But it often seems that this coursing circulatory system of medical data is clogged and clotted. Is all this information serving patients and helping doctors, or leaving the healthcare system drowning and confused?

    Help is on the way. At the 2014 Healthcare Summit, the world's most influential healthcare event featuring the top leaders in the industry, we will showcase several examples of how the production and analysis of new kinds of data are changing patient care, leading to new treatments, and saving money. Join us on December 3 and 4 to get smart about the big and little data that will shape the future of medicine. Our goal: to get from data to wisdom in a day."


    LINK: The Forbes Healthcare Summit 2014: The Agenda - Forbes


    The Forbes Healthcare Summit 2014: The Agenda

    I spend a lot of my time this year putting together the agenda for our annual Forbes Healthcare Summit, which will be held this year on December 3 and 4. Its an invite-only event where we gather some of the top minds in health care. This year will feature patients, entrepreneurs, and top researchers who are all changing the way we care for the sick using new and potentially better sources of data. Im psyched.

    Its still possible to get an invite to be an attendee. Send an email to healthcare@forbes.com.

    Sponsors for the event include Medidata, PwC, Allscripts, AthenaHealth, Covance, Optum, Docusign, IMS Health, and SAS.

    Forbes Healthcare Summit 2014: Smart Data Transforming Lives
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Wednesday, December 3

    6:00 pm Reception Featuring a showcase of innovations.

    7:00 pm Welcome: Smart Data Transforming Lives
    Steve Forbes, Chairman & Editor-in-Chief, Forbes Media

    7:15 pm Drug Development in a Time of Ebola The world is facing the worst Ebola outbreak in history. Now is the time to test new drugs and vaccines. The FDAs top minds tell us how we can do it.
    Edward Cox, Director, Office of Antimicrobial Products, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration
    Luciana Borio, Assistant Commissioner for Counterterrorism Policy, U.S. Food and Drug Administration
    Moderator: Matthew Herper, Senior Editor, Forbes Media

    Thursday, December 4

    7:00 am Registration/Breakfast

    8:00 am Introduction and Overview Matthew Herper, Senior Editor, Forbes Media

    8:05 am Welcome: Right Here, Right Now
    Steve Forbes, Chairman and Editor-in-Chief, Forbes Media

    8:15 am NantHealth Goes Global Last year at the Forbes Healthcare Summit, Patrick Soon-Shiong unveiled a sweeping vision of healthcares digital future. Now he says its getting even bigger.
    John Chen, Executive Chairman of the Board & Chief Executive Officer, BlackBerry
    Tim Kelsey, National Director for Patients & Information, NHS England
    Patrick Soon-Shiong,Chairman & Chief Executive Officer, NantHealth

    Moderator: Steve Forbes, Chairman & Editor-in-Chief, Forbes Media

    8:50 am DATA SPOTLIGHT: How Scientists Taught My Immune System to Kill My Cancer
    Doug Olson, President, Tekjo Consulting

    8:55 am A Tipping Point for Cancer Treatment New approaches in immune treatments and genetic technology mean that were making progress in ways that were previously unimaginable. Is vanquishing cancer possible?
    Alan Auerbach, Chairman, President & Chief Executive Officer, Puma Biotechnology
    Bob Hugin, Chairman & Chief Executive Officer, Celgene Corporation
    Richard Klausner, Chief Medical Officer, Illumina, and Former Director, National Cancer Institute
    Sandra Swain, Medical Director, Washington Cancer Institute at MedStar Washington Hospital Center
    Moderator: Matthew Herper, Senior Editor, Forbes

    9:35 am DATA SPOTLIGHT: How Much Should Drugs Cost? A Big Data Solution
    Murray Aitken, Senior Vice President, IMS Health and Executive Director, IMS Institute for Healthcare Informatics.

    9:45 am Who Owns Your Data? The creation of new drugs and diagnostics depends on linking genetic and medical data. But who owns that information? You? Your hospital? Your insurer? The way we answer these questions will determine whether or not we get new treatments.
    Linda Avey, Co-Founder & Chief Executive, We Are Curious
    Jamie Heywood, Co-Founder & Chairman, PatientsLikeMe
    Eric Schadt, Professor & Chair, Genetics and Genomic Sciences and Director, Icahn Institute for Genomics and Multiscale Biology, The Mount Sinai School of Medicine
    George Yancopoulos, Chief Scientific Officer, Regeneron, and President, Regeneron Laboratories
    Moderator: Matthew Herper, Senior Editor, Forbes

    10:25 am BREAK (Atrium)

    10:45 am Health Insurance: Prescriptions for Populations How will we use data to improve the health of every person an insurer covers? That will be the key to success in the future.
    David Goldhill, Author, Catastrophic Care and President & Chief Executive Officer, Game Show Network
    Dan Hilferty, President & Chief Executive Officer, Independence Blue Cross
    Kevin Nazemi, Co-Founder & Co-Chief Executive Officer, Oscar Insurance
    Samuel Nussbaum, Chief Medical Officer & Executive Vice President, Clinical Health Policy, WellPoint
    Moderator: Avik Roy, Contributor, Forbes Media and Senior Fellow, Manhattan Institute for Policy Research

    11:25 am DATA SPOTLIGHT: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help Health Insurers

    Colin Hill, Co-Founder, Chairman, President & Chief Executive Officer, GNS Healthcare

    11:30 am Making Medicine High Tech for Real Because of government incentives, U.S. doctors and hospitals are finally adopting electronic health records. But if prices are extortionate and data are not shared everybody loses. How can we win?
    Paul Black, President & Chief Executive Officer, Allscripts
    Jonathan Bush, Chief Executive Officer & Co-Founder, athenahealth
    Robert Robbins, President & Chief Executive Officer, Texas Medical Center
    Richard Rothman, Founder, Rothman Institute and James Edward Professor, Thomas Jefferson University
    Moderator: Erin DuPree, Chief Medical Officer & Vice President, Joint Commission for Transforming Healthcare

    12:10 pm LUNCH

    1:30 pm The Top Health Industry Trends to Watch in 2015 A new health economy is taking shape. Next year the $2.8 trillion U.S. healthcare industry will finally begin to look and feel more like like the rest of the business world: catering to wired customers who expect one-click service and fast access to data.
    Kelly Barnes, Partner and U.S. Health Industries Leader, PwC

    1:45 DATA SPOTLIGHT: Preventing The Next Ebola
    Dune Ives, Senior Director, Vulcan Philanthropy & Co-Manager, Paul G. Allen Family Foundation

    1:50 pm Radical Transparency: Lets Talk About Our Genomes Senior Editor Matthew Herper just had his DNA sequenced. Top genomics expert Robert Green, also Matts doctor, had already taken the plunge. With the help of experts in the audience, theyll lead a powerful, personal conversation about what it means to know whats in your genes.

    Patient: Matthew Herper, Senior Editor, Forbes
    Doctor: Robert Green, Director, G2P Research Program, Harvard Medical School

    2:10 pm DATA SPOTLIGHT: How to Cut a Year Off Your Clinical Trial
    William Klitgaard, Chief Information Officer, Covance

    2:20 pm Learning From Real Life Right now, data collection is a laborious process. But very soon all the information about a patient will be gathered automatically, in real time. That will change everything.
    Glen de Vries, President, Medidata Solutions
    Jeff Hammerbacher, Chief Scientist, Cloudera
    Dena Bravata, Chief Medical Officer, Castlight Health
    Jeroen Tas, Chief Executive Officer, Informatics Solutions and Services, Philips Healthcare
    Moderator: Harlan Krumholz, Contributor, Forbes Media and Harold H. Hines, Jr. Professor of Medicine, Yale University

    3:00 pm DATA SPOTLIGHT: Collaborating With Big Data
    Paul Bleicher, Chief Executive Officer, Optum Labs

    3:10 pm BREAK (Atrium) 3:30 pm DATA SPOTLIGHT: How Real-Time Monitoring Changed the Way I Treat Heart Patients
    Suneet Mittal, Director, Electrophysiology, Valley Hospital Health System

    3:40 pm Big Data Inspiration What do patients think of the data revolution? Hear the stories of a cancer patient who is donating his data, a woman whose lung tumors faded thanks to DNA sequencing, and a diabetic who received an artificial pancreas.

    Garth Callaghan
    Corey Wood
    Kady Helme
    Moderator: Dan Diamond, Contributor, Forbes Media and Executive Editor, Advisory Board Company

    4:05 pm DATA SPOTLIGHT:Using Sound to Probeand Cutthe Body.
    Jonathan Rothberg, Chief Strategy Officer, 4Combinator

    4:15 pm Betting on the Future Three of the worlds leading healthcare investors tell us how changing incentives, big data and other new technologies will change healthcareand where they are putting their money right now.
    Brandon Hull, Managing Partner, Cardinal Partners
    Robert Kocher, Partner, Venrock
    John Sculley, Managing Partner, Sculley Family Office
    Moderator: Moira Forbes, President & Publisher, ForbesWoman

    5:00 pm Close
    Steve Forbes, Chairman & Editor-in-Chief, Forbes Media

    5:30 pm Reception (Atrium)

    ================================================== =================================================
    jasg999, neoberry99, jxnb and 6 others like this.
    11-24-14 10:04 PM
  2. world traveler and former ceo's Avatar
    Impressive!! This could be huge for BlackBerry...

    Posted via CB10
    11-24-14 10:58 PM
  3. itsyaboy's Avatar
    This is definitely an area where BlackBerry (with partners) should take a pioneering role!!! Form bridges with existing medical technology companies and become the biggest player before Apple will try it.. :O
    11-25-14 04:56 AM
  4. bakron1's Avatar
    This is a potentially huge deal for BlackBerry and getting in on the ground floor is a big benefit.

    Sent from my Lovely Passport on T Mobile USA
    11-25-14 07:31 AM
  5. FSeverino's Avatar
    Hopefully this brings some positive news to BlackBerry. The only thing I'm worried about is that BlackBerry doesn't have a tablet and that is where the push will be in this area.

    If you watch greys anatomy they got surface tablets a few seasons ago and the whole show is now a digital hospital with each doc using tablets. Obviously it is a TV show, but it does show how it could possibly work irl

    Posted via CB10
    11-25-14 11:23 AM
  6. BACK-2-BLACK's Avatar
    JC has teased in some presentations of how BB is working on a Tablet (or something like that). Perhaps someone can confirm.

    May never materialize, but who knows!
    11-25-14 12:21 PM
  7. itsyaboy's Avatar
    In my opinion, BlackBerry should think bigger than just a tablet that can be used in hospitals. I don't believe that tablets are the way to go, because of several issues: 1) incredible battery life is necessary because hospital physicians are always on the go and cannot afford to charge during the day or night, 2) form factor because they will not carry something that will slow them down, 3) what is the added use for daily patient care? 4) the potential revenue of this is imo limited

    I would say that a total solution is far more desirable. Create a system where all patient data comes together, with input from, say like, the monitoring of vital parameters. This system should be accessible from multiple devices (i.e. make it crossplatform) and should be secure (call it BES-H, BES Healthcare, or Clinical OS, which already exists thanks to NantHealth of course). Make it so that communication with other physicians is easy to use and quick and secure. Make it also that only relevant medical information is displayed to the correct speciality. A surgeon should not be able to withdraw information from the cardiologic patient file (unless the patient authorizes it). Preferably, it should also be accessible from home in a secure way. Some radiologists already stay home during night shifts because they can see the radiologic images at home.

    I believe that if BlackBerry and NantHealth can deliver such a system that is secure and pratical (some current programs that I know are definitely not practical), this will mean MILLIONS in revenue (seriously).

    There are so many ways in which the hospital life of a physician can be improved by medical technologies, I mean there are probably a lot of things I can't even think of, instead of just creating a device with limited capabilities.
    11-26-14 08:14 AM
  8. BACK-2-BLACK's Avatar
    This concept or new way for Health Care is much bigger than a tablet. (I was just replying to a previous post about tablets).

    Nice that BB invested into Nanthealth....and hope that Nanthealth does becomes more substantial and prominent in this field with Blackberry leading the way for Securing the data flow.
    11-27-14 02:53 PM
  9. Prem WatsApp's Avatar
    Ironically John Sculley, ex-Apple CEO, is there, too... LOL
    :-D

    ? ? ? Zzzzwipetyped from The Maskport - Zzzzmoqin'.... ? ? ?
    11-27-14 03:23 PM
  10. BACK-2-BLACK's Avatar
    Ironically John Sculley, ex-Apple CEO, is there, too... LOL
    :-D

    ? ? ? Zzzzwipetyped from The Maskport - Zzzzmoqin'.... ? ? ?
    Ooooo...good eye mate!

    He was one the "potential" buyers when BlackBerry was up for sale, hebjust couldn't raise enough $$$ at the time.

    Thinks he knows something?
    11-27-14 08:01 PM
  11. Superfly_FR's Avatar
    The only thing I'm worried about is that BlackBerry doesn't have a tablet and that is where the push will be in this area
    Don't. They may eventually decide to build one later, but as of date and AFAIK it's not on the roadmap.
    We have to understand that BlackBerry is now a cross-platform software company and a device (smartphones) maker, both aimed first to enterprises.
    See how they promote "BES" naming (instread of BlackBerry Enterprise Server) and stamp (devices) competitors logo on each and every slide of their presentations.
    They're not fighting against them, they warmly welcome them in an environment where BlackBerry adds their how-to and proved security.

    Also, they have to deal with one matter at the time, not try to "fix everything at the same time" as Chen stated recently (end of video - BTW I'm stunned by the sincerity of this ITW.)
    John Chen: `I'm Not Crazy' for Taking CEO Job: Video - Bloomberg
    Fighting today against iPads and Surfaces is a lost battle, given the means they have in hands.

    So, create the high level infrastructures, security "protocols" and back-end software first.
    BlackBerry devices have / will always have a "plus" for those willing it.
    Timing ist the key.
    deremi and rarsen like this.
    12-04-14 08:08 AM
  12. itsyaboy's Avatar
    Totally agree. Devices can't be their primary focus anymore and devices will not dominate in the healthcare sector. Information systems stand far better chances of long term adoption. I still believe that BlackBerry is the ultimate player to create a fully featured, secure electronic patient file system that is capable of communication. And seeing how they partner with others, that'd be a real smart choice. Let's see how that BlackBerry - NantHealth thing works out.

    And thanks for that video! I love that Chen!
    Superfly_FR likes this.
    12-04-14 08:36 AM
  13. BACK-2-BLACK's Avatar
    Tweet Pics from the Forbes Healthcare Summit :




    Last edited by BACK-2-BLACK; 12-04-14 at 11:54 AM.
    Superfly_FR likes this.
    12-04-14 11:43 AM
  14. BACK-2-BLACK's Avatar
    Viewing A Genome On A BlackBerry Phone

    Published on Dec 4, 2014
    NantHealth CEO Patrick Soon-Shiong says his new app will let doctors view genomes on a secure phone.

    Check out the Video from the conference

    Superfly_FR likes this.
    12-04-14 11:45 AM
  15. BACK-2-BLACK's Avatar
    NantHealth CEO Patrick Soon-Shiong mentions that he will be on 60 minutes this Sunday and this new app will be featured in the upcoming CES !!
    12-04-14 11:57 AM
  16. BACK-2-BLACK's Avatar
    Opportunity for NantHealth announcement.

    Published on Dec 4, 2014
    CEO Patrick Soon-Shiong tells Steve Forbes the inspiration for taking his company public in 2015

    More video goodness from Forbes Health Care Summit:

    12-04-14 12:31 PM
  17. itsyaboy's Avatar
    Thanks for the info! Though as a Dutchman, I haven't heard 60 minutes. Wonder if it's streamable after it has aired?
    12-04-14 03:17 PM
  18. early2bed's Avatar
    Thanks for the info! Though as a Dutchman, I haven't heard 60 minutes. Wonder if it's streamable after it has aired?
    60 Minutes can be listened to on popular podcast utilities like Stitcher the day after it airs on Sunday.

    Does anyone else in health care think that this talk of viewing the human genome on a mobile device is bizarre? I seriously can't think of a clinical setting where it would be useful to view any part of the genome on a mobile device. This has no practical health care application that I know of.
    12-04-14 04:41 PM
  19. itsyaboy's Avatar
    60 Minutes can be listened to on popular podcast utilities like Stitcher the day after it airs on Sunday.

    Does anyone else in health care think that this talk of viewing the human genome on a mobile device is bizarre? I seriously can't think of a clinical setting where it would be useful to view any part of the genome on a mobile device. This has no practical health care application that I know of.
    Thanks for the tip about Stitcher!

    And yes, I agree, I fail to see the clinical relevance of such an app, but there is probably more to it than they currently said. I'll definitely tune in to 60 minutes!
    12-04-14 04:51 PM
  20. RECOOL's Avatar
    60 Minutes can be listened to on popular podcast utilities like Stitcher the day after it airs on Sunday.

    Does anyone else in health care think that this talk of viewing the human genome on a mobile device is bizarre? I seriously can't think of a clinical setting where it would be useful to view any part of the genome on a mobile device. This has no practical health care application that I know of.
    You missing the point bruv. If he can pull genome data to that level of detail what else can he pull? A man as smart & rich as himself (13 billion) wouldn't create app for one thing. He told you the trick and you still don't get it.The magic lies in this cloud and data pull which was pretty damn fast for where ever its coming from.

    I guess its typical of todays world the front end is all we can see and pay for. Backends not important until things break and the backend takes front stage with a dumbed down explanation that its really the most important part.
    12-05-14 08:22 AM
  21. itsyaboy's Avatar
    You missing the point bruv. If he can pull genome data to that level of detail what else can he pull? A man as smart & rich as himself (13 billion) wouldn't create app for one thing. He told you the trick and you still don't get it.The magic lies in this cloud and data pull which was pretty damn fast for where ever its coming from.
    Paving the way for an always connected secure electronic patient file system? Oh yes, this will definitely be the last time I'll say that.. haha. So awesome!
    12-05-14 08:27 AM
  22. early2bed's Avatar
    You missing the point bruv. If he can pull genome data to that level of detail what else can he pull? A man as smart & rich as himself (13 billion) wouldn't create app for one thing. He told you the trick and you still don't get it.The magic lies in this cloud and data pull which was pretty damn fast for where ever its coming from.
    I don't see how that's a demonstration of anything other than a fast cloud server and wifi. Frankly, I'd be more impressed with 4K video streaming as that's some real evidence of bandwidth.

    So you pull the genome data down to a Passport. What, exactly do you do with it? Let's say there is a particular gene that leads to a treatment decision. Wouldn't it be a hell of a lot easier to just flag the medical record with something like "Carries the gene for XXXX susceptibility" rather than download the entire genome to a mobile device? That would be like downloading the entire Google Maps for the US to find the nearest Starbucks.

    This idea doesn't even stand up to the slightest scrutiny. Either these technologists falsely believe that genomes are the key to curing most diseases or they are simply tapping into a healthcare market that is soon going to consume 20% of US GDP.
    12-05-14 08:39 AM
  23. THBW's Avatar
    I don't see how that's a demonstration of anything other than a fast cloud server and wifi. Frankly, I'd be more impressed with 4K video streaming as that's some real evidence of bandwidth.

    So you pull the genome data down to a Passport. What, exactly do you do with it? Let's say there is a particular gene that leads to a treatment decision. Wouldn't it be a hell of a lot easier to just flag the medical record with something like "Carries the gene for XXXX susceptibility" rather than download the entire genome to a mobile device? That would be like downloading the entire Google Maps for the US to find the nearest Starbucks.

    This idea doesn't even stand up to the slightest scrutiny. Either these technologists falsely believe that genomes are the key to curing most diseases or they are simply tapping into a healthcare market that is soon going to consume 20% of US GDP.
    And how do you determine whether someone has a genetic susceptibility. A specialist has to interpret the information, make a decision and then send that decision to an electronic record. LOL, have you ever, ever worked in a hospital? As too a working example, think cardiac death. It isn't rocket science.

    As t

    Posted via CB10
    12-05-14 09:37 AM
  24. RECOOL's Avatar
    I don't see how that's a demonstration of anything other than a fast cloud server and wifi. Frankly, I'd be more impressed with 4K video streaming as that's some real evidence of bandwidth.

    So you pull the genome data down to a Passport. What, exactly do you do with it? Let's say there is a particular gene that leads to a treatment decision. Wouldn't it be a hell of a lot easier to just flag the medical record with something like "Carries the gene for XXXX susceptibility" rather than download the entire genome to a mobile device? That would be like downloading the entire Google Maps for the US to find the nearest Starbucks.

    This idea doesn't even stand up to the slightest scrutiny. Either these technologists falsely believe that genomes are the key to curing most diseases or they are simply tapping into a healthcare market that is soon going to consume 20% of US GDP.
    You just arguing with yourself.You have the answer.There are plenty of doctors on call , out of office, elite doctors that travel the world.Now if your one of those MOBILE doctors and you can pull down records anywhere in the palm of your hand.You can asses conditions before you even get to the patients/hospital/consultation. All this gives doctors time to make decisions quickly or slowly depending on situation.You no longer have to wait to get to a pc/laptop and hospital networks before assessing conditions.

    You keep focusing on this genome thing. The big picture is medical data being pulled quickly and safely to doctors anywhere ,anytime.If your a mobile doctor.I don't know you can screen share these genome/records in BBM meetings. And talk with other doctors and suggest treatment on condition/patient X,Y,Z. I don't know its just some crack pot theory. Too much smoke of medicinal.

    I don't know maybe if it was another useless social app/spotify it will make sense right
    Last edited by RECOOL; 12-05-14 at 10:30 AM.
    12-05-14 10:19 AM
  25. early2bed's Avatar
    I think we already have something like this - electronic medical records. I use them every day on mobile devices. Trust me, the transformation of someone's genomic data into useful information isn't going to happen on a mobile device. Again, it's like trying to download the map of an entire country rather than simply querying a database for specific directions.
    12-05-14 10:26 AM
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