1. darkone778's Avatar
    Living on Blackberry Island in the Sea of Android and iOS

    I have been a user of Android since the first Motorola Droid was released all the way back in 2010. In that time, smartphones have come a very long way. Gone are the days of Windows Mobile and underpowered smartphones, gone are the days of physical keyboards, though with some rare exceptions. We now live in a world of flat black slabbed screen phones that either run some form of Android or iOS. I have always shunned away from iOS as the walled garden approach Apple has taken to it never really fit my use case. I use many different operating systems, Linux, Windows, MacOS, even TrueOS on occasion. So my need for my technology to play nicely together is imperative.

    So fast forward to April of 2017, I decided it was time to pick up a new smartphone. As my aging LG G3 was finally on its last legs. So I upgraded to the Blu Life One X2, mostly because of cost, $149.00 is hard to beat. After a few months of using it, I took some time to examine just how much I have come to rely on Google products and services on a daily basis. I mean I use Chrome, 2 Android/RemixOS tablets, and years of Android as my daily driver. I ended up coming to the realization that I was just as much locked into Google as I was back in the late 90’s and early 2000’s as I was to Microsoft and Windows. When you end up realizing that Google can try to position itself all it wants to as a straight up technology company, but at the end of the day, they really are nothing then an advertising company.

    When you see Google through the advertising company lens you see that to them you are the product, for the privacy-focused users that's a scary place to be. So I started looking at the alternatives that were available to me. iOS nope does play well in Linux, Windows Phone has too much of an app gap. I then landed on BlackBerry 10, native apps but supports installing Android apps as well. Now while this was not a perfect solution, but it seemed like a workable compromise.

    So off to the races I went, looking at all the various BB10 devices that were available. Unfortunately, most were much older models like the z10, or the BlackBerry Classic. While cheap they did not interest me mostly from the lack of battery. So I looked over reviews and the one that kept coming up with the best battery life was the Passport. So I took the plunge and purchased and NIB Passport from Amazon for $140.00. I received it in about 2 days, opened it right up to set up all my accounts. Gmail, Yahoo, Outlook, etc. Once I got that done I into the store, BlackBerry World and started looking for apps this is where a struggle began. Now, for myself, I have always been one to explore the various app stores, looking for new and different apps.

    So one of the things I needed to determine in this switch from Android to BB10, was what apps do I absolutely need and would it play nice with my Linux machines? The answer to that question I found was Spotify, Netflix, Telegram, Twitter, and Facebook Messenger and yes it works with my Linux machines. Well, Spotify is available on the Amazon Appstore, which is already installed for you. Netflix, that required a little more work to get working as the Android runtime that is on the Passport is on 4.3, and directly downloading the apk from Netflix caused an error in the app. After a bit of hunting, I found a functioning apk. Next up we have Telegram, now personally I use SocialIM for Telegram from BlackBerry World, as it meets all my Telegram needs, so your mileage may vary. Twitter does have a native bb10 client though I would recommend either Blaq or Twittly. Both apps use the BlackBerry Hub for notifications. Now we have Facebook Messenger, there are a few messenger clients available in BB World, but they all have issues, such as delayed notifications, not working the hub like advertised, etc. So for myself I just downloaded, I believe version 27 or 47 of Messenger Android app and use that. There are limitations now video calling but has phone calls, chat heads work but the app has to be left running. As far as the Linux Machines setting up wifi sharing was simple to solve the getting files to and from the phone. While I initially thought that going back to a physical keyboard, after years of a virtual one would be my biggest hurdle, I have come to love having the physical keyboard again.

    With all those apps installed I have been able to completely replace using Android as my daily driver and completely switched to BB10. Which unfortunately is a dead platform. Some of the best features of BB10 are the Hub and the gesture-based UI that I have seen been incorporated into Android more and more, Slide out menus from the side etc. BB10 and the Cascades framework started doing all that way back in 2012. I think it is sad that BB10 was never really given a fair shake by the press. It was doom and gloom about it from the day it was launched. It’s too different, there are no apps, etc. I think the problem at the end of the day boils down that so few in the tech press actually used it, and really gave it the fair shot it really deserved. Of course, there was also the delay from BlackBerry in coming out with BB10 that put them very far behind the curve, after years of Android and iOS devices. So for me, I see BB10 as an island of salvation in middle of the sea of Android and iOS phones. I plan on vacationing on this island till the volcano erupts and it is no more.
    DallinCrump, FF22, rarsen and 2 others like this.
    01-01-18 10:30 AM
  2. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    Living on Blackberry Island in the Sea of Android and iOS

    I have been a user of Android since the first Motorola Droid was released all the way back in 2010. In that time, smartphones have come a very long way. Gone are the days of Windows Mobile and underpowered smartphones, gone are the days of physical keyboards, though with some rare exceptions. We now live in a world of flat black slabbed screen phones that either run some form of Android or iOS. I have always shunned away from iOS as the walled garden approach Apple has taken to it never really fit my use case. I use many different operating systems, Linux, Windows, MacOS, even TrueOS on occasion. So my need for my technology to play nicely together is imperative.

    So fast forward to April of 2017, I decided it was time to pick up a new smartphone. As my aging LG G3 was finally on its last legs. So I upgraded to the Blu Life One X2, mostly because of cost, $149.00 is hard to beat. After a few months of using it, I took some time to examine just how much I have come to rely on Google products and services on a daily basis. I mean I use Chrome, 2 Android/RemixOS tablets, and years of Android as my daily driver. I ended up coming to the realization that I was just as much locked into Google as I was back in the late 90’s and early 2000’s as I was to Microsoft and Windows. When you end up realizing that Google can try to position itself all it wants to as a straight up technology company, but at the end of the day, they really are nothing then an advertising company.

    When you see Google through the advertising company lens you see that to them you are the product, for the privacy-focused users that's a scary place to be. So I started looking at the alternatives that were available to me. iOS nope does play well in Linux, Windows Phone has too much of an app gap. I then landed on BlackBerry 10, native apps but supports installing Android apps as well. Now while this was not a perfect solution, but it seemed like a workable compromise.

    So off to the races I went, looking at all the various BB10 devices that were available. Unfortunately, most were much older models like the z10, or the BlackBerry Classic. While cheap they did not interest me mostly from the lack of battery. So I looked over reviews and the one that kept coming up with the best battery life was the Passport. So I took the plunge and purchased and NIB Passport from Amazon for $140.00. I received it in about 2 days, opened it right up to set up all my accounts. Gmail, Yahoo, Outlook, etc. Once I got that done I into the store, BlackBerry World and started looking for apps this is where a struggle began. Now, for myself, I have always been one to explore the various app stores, looking for new and different apps.

    So one of the things I needed to determine in this switch from Android to BB10, was what apps do I absolutely need and would it play nice with my Linux machines? The answer to that question I found was Spotify, Netflix, Telegram, Twitter, and Facebook Messenger and yes it works with my Linux machines. Well, Spotify is available on the Amazon Appstore, which is already installed for you. Netflix, that required a little more work to get working as the Android runtime that is on the Passport is on 4.3, and directly downloading the apk from Netflix caused an error in the app. After a bit of hunting, I found a functioning apk. Next up we have Telegram, now personally I use SocialIM for Telegram from BlackBerry World, as it meets all my Telegram needs, so your mileage may vary. Twitter does have a native bb10 client though I would recommend either Blaq or Twittly. Both apps use the BlackBerry Hub for notifications. Now we have Facebook Messenger, there are a few messenger clients available in BB World, but they all have issues, such as delayed notifications, not working the hub like advertised, etc. So for myself I just downloaded, I believe version 27 or 47 of Messenger Android app and use that. There are limitations now video calling but has phone calls, chat heads work but the app has to be left running. As far as the Linux Machines setting up wifi sharing was simple to solve the getting files to and from the phone. While I initially thought that going back to a physical keyboard, after years of a virtual one would be my biggest hurdle, I have come to love having the physical keyboard again.

    With all those apps installed I have been able to completely replace using Android as my daily driver and completely switched to BB10. Which unfortunately is a dead platform. Some of the best features of BB10 are the Hub and the gesture-based UI that I have seen been incorporated into Android more and more, Slide out menus from the side etc. BB10 and the Cascades framework started doing all that way back in 2012. I think it is sad that BB10 was never really given a fair shake by the press. It was doom and gloom about it from the day it was launched. It’s too different, there are no apps, etc. I think the problem at the end of the day boils down that so few in the tech press actually used it, and really gave it the fair shot it really deserved. Of course, there was also the delay from BlackBerry in coming out with BB10 that put them very far behind the curve, after years of Android and iOS devices. So for me, I see BB10 as an island of salvation in middle of the sea of Android and iOS phones. I plan on vacationing on this island till the volcano erupts and it is no more.
    Unfortunately, much of what you describe wasn't around in 2012 for consumers, as BB10 and its hardware was introduced end of January 2013 and was not the BB10 you find so usable and friendly. Enjoy what's left while it lasts. Check out BBAndroid since that seems to capture some of what BB10 tried creating. I've used all the OS and Ill tolerate some of BBMo problems since I hope to see BBAndroid continue with BBMo devices over straight Android.
    01-01-18 02:40 PM
  3. bbrotestant's Avatar
    It's an irony that in an age of data mining and large-scale identity market, BB is a fringe brand. Let's give it few more years. Sure it won't grab the market, but I am confident it has it's place.
    Classic has a pretty decent battery life IMO (although replacing the battery itself is, apparently, a PITA).
    BB10 isn't perfec, it aged a lot in past two years, but I love the "classic" (Bold etc) design. And it's fair to say, I wouldnt be writing this without Cobalt's files.
    01-02-18 11:58 AM
  4. Chuck Finley69's Avatar
    It's an irony that in an age of data mining and large-scale identity market, BB is a fringe brand. Let's give it few more years. Sure it won't grab the market, but I am confident it has it's place.
    Classic has a pretty decent battery life IMO (although replacing the battery itself is, apparently, a PITA).
    BB10 isn't perfec, it aged a lot in past two years, but I love the "classic" (Bold etc) design. And it's fair to say, I wouldnt be writing this without Cobalt's files.
    There's no few years left. It's been declared EOL at end of 2019. With ART stuck at 4.3 and when BBW #1 app is a virtual tumbleweed, it's pretty much over. Enjoy what's left but accept imminent death.
    01-02-18 12:06 PM
  5. bbrotestant's Avatar
    Agreed, I meant the brand, not the devices with bb10 attached. A bit of a pity though.
    01-06-18 12:18 PM
  6. Golfdriver97's Avatar
    Welcome to the forums!
    01-18-18 09:30 AM
  7. bakron1's Avatar
    Welcome to CrackBerry and enjoy the forums.
    01-18-18 05:09 PM
  8. wingnut666's Avatar
    excellent post

    Posted via CBX
    01-19-18 12:25 PM
  9. Dunt Dunt Dunt's Avatar
    I think the problem at the end of the day boils down that so few in the tech press actually used it, and really gave it the fair shot it really deserved. Of course, there was also the delay from BlackBerry in coming out with BB10 that put them very far behind the curve, after years of Android and iOS devices. So for me, I see BB10 as an island of salvation in middle of the sea of Android and iOS phones. I plan on vacationing on this island till the volcano erupts and it is no more.
    If you go back to the Z10 launch, most the press gave it good reviews. And there was a lot of marketing (other thing many think was an issue).

    The issue was apps, what you see now... isn't what we had for that first eight months or so. There for a while the runtime was even locked, you had to have a developer key and reinstall the app every 30 days. So to install an Android app not already ported to BBW required a LOT of work. And even now relies on Hacks or Patching of apps... neither is something a company like BlackBerry can base their commercial product on.

    Enjoy it and use it as you can.... great OS that had a lot of potential if only it had come sooner. Microsoft sorta proved that it wasn't about hardware, marketing or the press or even paying developers... it was just too late as the market was mature and didn't need other players.
    01-19-18 02:54 PM

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