1. JavaDogg's Avatar
    Hi everyone. I'm currently writing apps for the Android platform. Given the extremely sad state of support by Google, the HUGE mess of their Market and the numerous problems from the way-too-early-release of their OS, I've decided to look elsewhere for programming fun.

    I plan on using the RIM API set with the BlackBerry JDK. So far the JDK seems OK, although a tad bit on the slow side.

    I've noticed, however, that there is a distinct lack of programming books for the BlackBerry. Actually, NONE. Strange. I've yet to dig deep into the BlackBerry developer docs on their site, I hope it will be informative enough.

    I don't have a BlackBerry phone yet, but I'm considering the 8100 series of phones. They seem right for what I need and are not too large.

    Anyways, nice site and forum!
    04-01-09 01:10 AM
  2. Branta's Avatar
    Go with something more current than 8100 series if you're considering programming for BB. The programming is basically Java so the only thing you need extra is the JDK docs which look adequate
    04-01-09 07:02 PM
  3. JavaDogg's Avatar
    I know a few people where I live and they work for big corporations. A new 8120 is around $300, unlocked. I would like to have access to a broader market, without going too far back into the older systems. So I settled on the 8800 up, the 4.2.1 JDK.

    I don't know if that will be good or not. If not, I can change it later.

    I'd rather use the RIM API, as I don't plan on porting to desktops or Symbian phones. Android uses it's own version of Java (to interact with the hardware), iPhone uses Objective C, Windows Mobile uses C# or C++, so I don't see the need to stick purely with Java. I'll leave the hardware interaction to abstract classes so they can be ported (if need be).

    I'm also thinking that with the economy in rough times, companies may decide to keep their older phones instead of upgrading to the Bold/Storm. Why spend the extra money if they don't have to? I could be wrong on this, but it makes sense to me.
    04-01-09 11:56 PM
  4. JavaDogg's Avatar
    Whoops, my mistake. I should be developing for the 83** Curve series of phones.
    04-02-09 12:14 AM
  5. graspDESIGN's Avatar
    You should develop for the 9530 Storms....
    04-02-09 04:16 AM
  6. ninja please's Avatar
    83xx series are the most reliable at the moment, as are 88xx... iStorm people need to chill til better dev softwares come out, but you know how impatient they are
    04-02-09 08:19 AM
  7. graspDESIGN's Avatar
    Impatient? Well yes, we are.

    The way I see it is that IF, and Im not saying this will even happen, but IF RIM starts to discontinue older models, they will start from the bottom up. Seeing that there are more and more newer models coming out, might as well develop for the newer models and platforms. By the time you get things worked out and perfected for them, there will be even newer ones out.

    Just my $0.02
    04-02-09 06:09 PM
  8. MarcusAurelius's Avatar
    83xx series are the most reliable at the moment, as are 88xx... iStorm people need to chill til better dev softwares come out, but you know how impatient they are
    Haha, iStorm perfectly describes a group of displaced Apple fanboys who think writing perfect software can be done at the drop of a hat. Nice one.
    04-02-09 09:49 PM
  9. Branta's Avatar
    I'd rather use the RIM API, as I don't plan on porting to desktops or Symbian phones. Android uses it's own version of Java (to interact with the hardware), iPhone uses Objective C, Windows Mobile uses C# or C++, so I don't see the need to stick purely with Java. I'll leave the hardware interaction to abstract classes so they can be ported (if need be).
    I think you're talking about the right concept. The API is the BB specific Java classes and methods which you need to use, but you need it as part of a compiled Java program just like any other Java API. Remember the core of all RIM devices is a dedicated JVM.

    I'm not so convinced about trying to write code which can be ported to/from other languages. It never seems to work well and success on a handheld device needs tightly optimised code. In practical terms you need to design each app for a specific device (or OS) then write dedicated code to implement it. That doesn't mean the core concepts (the business logic part) won't port, but you will need to recode. I think you will never get good results if you try to reuse code with an interface wrapper for a different compiler.
    04-04-09 11:32 AM
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